Perils of Going to School
By Ramblin’ Rose

Perils of Going to School
By Ramblin’ Rose

Experts, including pediatricians, and some politicians encourage the return to personal instruction for our nation’s youth in the classroom. Some politicians and many teachers demand that only distance learning occur. Many school districts have chosen one or the other, while other districts have created “hybrid” programs that appear to challenge even a professional scheduler.

It befuddles one to find the logic (other than fewer bodies in a building on any given day) of attending school one to four days per week but never five. How do working parents adjust to such schedules? How will students know when to go and what to have prepared? Schools (K-16) have tried A/B days, rotating schedules (morning vs. afternoon), six classes out of seven meeting every day on a rotational basis with less than desired results.

While parents, students, and administrators should employ caution in making the best decisions for the children and the community, there are news articles that are just as frightening as the virus. Teachers have actually published their fears that parents and community members may actually be able to observe the digital classes and learn of the indoctrination programs in contemporary curricula. Much of that propaganda has remained in the classroom when only the students attended classes.

Last spring, Harvard professor Elizabeth Bartholet called homeschooling “dangerous.” Her claim was “the lack of regulation on homeschooling poses a danger to children, because it risks depriving them of an adequate education….”

An adequate education? By whose standards?

While it is no surprise that others share her viewpoint, it is alarming that the leftists are not making any attempt to hide their disdain for families and family values and for their belief for secrecy and authoritarianism.

Matthew Key, an English instructor at the Science Leadership Academy in Philadelphia, bemoaned his loss of “what happens here stays here” ideology. He wrote:

“While conversation about race are in my wheelhouse, and remain a concern in this no-walls environment, I am most intrigued by the damage that ‘helicopter/snowplow’ parents can do in the host conversations about gender/sexuality. And while ‘conservative’ parents are my chief concern, I know that the damage can come from the left too. If we are engaged in the messy work of destabilizing a kid’s racism or homophobia or transphobia, how much do we want their classmates’ parents piling on?”

He is not alone in his fears. Across the country, teachers have marched with placards about not being able to teach from a grave; some have brought body bags to their “protests.” After this admonition from Mr. Key and some who responded to his posts, as well as the posts that educators have placed on Facebook, one wonders if their fear is for their personal well-being or for the discovery of their efforts to warp the minds of our young people. (Given the age of the anarchists in the streets destroying our cities this summer, one knows from their actions that the progressive agenda has been widely disseminated across postsecondary campuses with the desired results—hate for America and its freedoms.

President Trump is totally correct. The money should follow the child as the parents decide the place and type of education that they choose for their child/children. Unfortunately, federal funding accounts for only about 7%. State and local taxes provide the rest, and liberals will continue to fund and cry for increased funding for public schools. The teachers are already demanding “hazardous-duty pay” and “front-line workers.”

It is a dark time in the USA when public employees call parents “dangerous interlopers and intrusive outsiders.” We were warned that socialists/Marxists/communists would take over the country by brainwashing our children. We did not pay attention.

2 Responses to “The perils of in-person learning”

  • eric z says:

    Why do PhD candidates have a thesis advisor? Why do MD trainees do rounds? Why do unions have apprenticeships? It is as if to gain skills you need to learn directly from those having skills.

    Just saying.

    Also, homelessness is real; so home school out of that bind? Admittedly, Warren Buffet could home school if so inclined. Any wealthy wall streeter could. It’s not that difficult is it?

  • John Palmer says:

    It is indeed a dark time in education when educators claim the right to determine what is to be taught without consideration of the underlying views of the children’s first and foremost educators, the parents. Yes I know not every child’s parenting circumstance is ideal but that is no excuse to write off every child whose parents want a role in determining educational content.

    Those who want a role in determine what is taught should not be considered interlopers or outsiders. Remember schools have been organized to serve in the place of parents and school employees are hired to assist parents or guardians in the education of their children.

    When school employees see themselves as infinitely superior to parents and guardians in determining what children the raising of children shifts away from parents and guardians to the agents of the state. The slippery slope toward state control of child rearing is what represents outsiders and interlopers in what is a parental right.

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