Trying to figure out Tim Walz’s plan for reopening schools might take weeks. Figuring out whether Gov. Walz is a slave to EdMinn takes much less time. Tim Walz and the DFL essentially are indentured servants to EdMinn. They don’t dare do what’s right for the students. That’s how Gov. Walz and the DFL finished with the plan they’re currently pitching.

David Perry had been waiting for months to learn whether his two middle-­school children will be heading back to their Shoreview school in the fall.

He was still left hanging Thursday after Gov. Tim Walz announced a localized, model-driven approach to opening schools in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic. Decisions on whether to return to class, continue distance learning, or use some hybrid of both, will depend on the number of COVID-19 cases in a given area and a school’s ability to meet health and safety standards. School districts are expected to announce in the coming weeks one of three learning models they will use based on the formula laid out by the administration.

“I don’t feel like I know any more today about what is going to happen in September than I did yesterday, and we’ve been building up to this big announcement,” said Perry, whose son has Down syndrome and autism spectrum disorder. The family needs more time to plan for his education. “I don’t feel I’m any closer to understanding what’s going to happen with my kids or my work schedule,” Perry said.

Tim Walz is the anti-science governor. The DFL is his enabler. For months, child care centers have been operating safely. Despite facing the same hurdles, Tim Walz and the DFL can’t figure out how to safely return students to schools. (Perhaps we should put child care operators in charge of reopening schools. I’m only partially kidding.)

DFL House Speaker Melissa Hortman said she was pleased that Walz also announced plans to pump an additional $250 million of coronavirus relief funding into classrooms as they prepare for new social distancing measures. Among them will be a requirement for those who return to the classroom to wear masks. “Our districts need additional resources to provide the high-quality education we expect while keeping Minnesotans safe,” Hortman said.

Why isn’t the DFL pushing Gov. Walz to make classrooms safe so students can return to school? Why hasn’t the DFL admitted that students aren’t at risk, that the only people who might be at risk are older teachers? Instead, Gov. Walz and the DFL put together a plan that Einstein would have difficulty deciphering.

At the start of this clip, Gov. Walz tells a whopper:

This is a localized, data-driven approach to make sure that school districts where it is physically possible to teach our students, we will do that.

The matrix put together by the Walz administration has tons of caveats in it. That’s foolish. Students, especially grade school students, don’t transmit the virus. This isn’t opinion. It’s the finding of Dr. Scott Atlas of the Hoover Institution:

On Good Morning San Diego, Dr. Atlas said we are one of the only countries that is not planning to reopen our schools. “The data is clear. Whether it’s from Canada, Switzerland, Sweden, the Netherlands, France, Spain, the United States, Asia, all over the world, children do not have any serious disease. Children almost never transmit the disease. In fact, Switzerland is contemplating stopping even testing children because it’s irrelevant.”

Continuing, “there is not serious risk of even getting the illness. But that’s not even the point here, I want to go even further. By now, we know who is at risk. K-12 teachers in the United States, half of them are under 41 years of age, they’re not at risk. 82% are under 55-years-old, if there is a handful, which there are, teachers in the high-risk category, don’t they know how to protect themselves with their so called 6-feet spacing and mask rules? And if they’re still afraid, even if they don’t want to do that, then they can teach from home. I don’t understand why they have to lock up schools.”

The statistics point in one direction. The statistics show that students, especially younger students, aren’t transmitters of COVID. The point isn’t to wait until the virus is gone. The policy should be to mitigate as much of the risk as possible. That points to making things like plexiglass walls in classrooms standard to eliminate what little risk there is for teachers.

One Response to “Tim Walz’s dizzying leadership”

  • Rex newman says:

    In business, we would call Walz’s guidance a No Value Add. All of the information Walz used is readily available to the school districts. So is better local information. All Walz did is nail one foot to the floor long enough to make sure no district could even think about fully resuming. Just what Education Minnesota wanted, continuing to work half time for full pay, and no having to deal with student discipline issues.

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