For the past 2 weeks, Democrats have passionately insisted that the U.S. has a problem with “systemic racism.” I don’t believe that but let’s stipulate that for the sake of this experiment. If that’s true, the logical reaction to that would be to attack that system. The target, therefore, would be the white power structure and white privilege.

While later reaction included looting of the iconic Macys in NYC and other iconic symbols of white society, the initial reaction was to burn down minority neighborhoods. Saying that that’s illogical is understatement. There’s nothing in the initial reaction that suggests activists were speaking truth to power. The rioters and looters seemed far more interested in causing mayhem and spreading fear in minority neighborhoods than they seemed interested in uprooting the white power structure. Let’s ask some important questions. Let’s start with these:

  1. How does destroying a minority neighborhood uproot the white power structure?
  2. Does destroying minority-owned pharmacies and grocery stores make things worse or better for minorities?
  3. Doesn’t demolishing the neighborhood deli or neighborhood hardware store trash the hard work of minority business owners?
  4. When these ‘neighborhood institutions’ get demolished, how many years back does that set the entire neighborhood?

These aren’t trivial questions for the survival and prosperity of neighborhoods. They’re central to the survival and prosperity of neighborhoods.

I’d argue that the rioting and looting sounded more like a turf war between rival gangs than it sounds like another painful chapter in the civil rights movement. This isn’t about reclaiming neighborhoods. It’s about looting and vandalism. Ben Carson’s story is something to be examined. He didn’t get ahead by latching onto one government program after another. Dr. Carson got ahead because his mother taught him to spend tons of time reading.

Certainly, a major portion of his education came in schools but another major part of his education came from investing time in reading. That’s the blueprint that’s needed to change minority societies and neighborhoods. It worked once. It’ll work again if it’s tried.

Let’s further stipulate that this is a political issue. Robert Davi outlines it in this interview:

This isn’t a Democrat-only or Republican-only problem. It’s a problem that country club Republicans and limousine liberals have avoided for generations. For all of the nasty things said about this president, he’s been interested in solving problems. Let’s bring people of color together from both sides of the aisle at the White House. Let’s see President Trump bring together leaders in the Cabinet Room or somewhere prestigious inside the White House. Let’s have this discussion. Let’s put solutions on the table. Then, let’s establish timetables to accomplish those goals. It’s more than possible.

This is the United States. When we put our best minds together, there’s nothing we can’t accomplish. That’s only possible if we work together in a good faith fashion. That means not inviting Nancy Pelosi or Chuck Schumer to this meeting. It means inviting Dr. Carson, Bob Woodson, Jack Brewer, Bob Johnson and other who are willing to put their differences aside to make minority lives better.

Ronald Reagan believed that the victories he got credit for were won first by the American people. Finally, let’s stipulate that We The People will always drive the most essential societal changes. That’s how it’s always been. MLK didn’t change society by taking orders from the government. Ditto with President Reagan or President Trump. They changed societies because they won over the people. They didn’t make an impact by forcing things down people’s throats.

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