Saying that Minnesota DFL Gov. Tim Walz’s incompetence is hiding in plain sight is understatement. That isn’t really in dispute at this point. What’s hiding in plain sight, though, is the litany of leadership sins committed by Gov. Walz. What’s frightening is the fact that this isn’t a comprehensive list. Harold Hamilton’s commentary reads like an indictment against Gov. Walz’s administration.

Harold’s commentary starts by saying “It’s become quite clear that Governor Tim Walz is in over his head. He’s overmatched in this crisis. He’s displayed the character traits and leadership qualities (or lack thereof) of a poor, incompetent leader. This assessment isn’t partisan. It isn’t about name calling or scoring points. Instead, it’s a painful, morose realization that our chief executive didn’t rise to the occasion and the people of Minnesota will pay the price. Good leaders in a crisis impose order on chaos.. They provide clear direction and timely strategic guidance for staff and the troops. They inspire confidence and boost morale when the chips are down.”

Gov. Walz isn’t a leader. It’s charitable to say that he’s been a failure. It’s obvious that he’s hesitated in making important decisions. Many decisions don’t make sense. Big box stores can open fully but churches that hold 3,000+ people are limited to gatherings of 10 or less. What part of that thinking makes sense?

Poor leaders are fragile and insecure. This insecurity manifests itself in a façade of bravado and arrogance. It’s evident in the leader lashing out in the face of constructive criticism and having their dictates examined.

This is typical of Tim Walz. This week, when asked about GOP leaders questioning the continued closure of houses of worship, he snapped, “I get that some people think COVID-19 isn’t a big deal.”

That’s beyond thin-skinned. It’s what a constitutionally illiterate politician would say. The hostility Gov. Walz and the DFL have shown towards churches is palpable. The only people of faith that the DFL care about are the people who advocate for bigger government. The DFL doesn’t represent people of faith. The DFL represents a portion of people of faith.

Poor leaders also refuse to change course in the face of new information. Doing so requires the leader to admit the current course of action isn’t correct. In short, it requires a leader to admit that he’s wrong. It requires the leader to acknowledge that mission accomplishment is paramount and the leader’s ego and pride is of no consequence.

John Maynard Keynes, the famous economist, once said “When the facts change, I change my mind. What do you do, Sir?” Gov. Walz has little in common with Keynes. Gov. Walz has spent too much time in Washington, DC, where he’s stayed trapped in DC’s prison of 2 ideas.

When asked about his rationale for essentially closing indoor church services, only an idiot would suggest that Republicans don’t think COVID is a big deal. This isn’t how an intellectual heavyweight would’ve replied.

This story wouldn’t be complete without criticizing the Twin Cities media, too. They haven’t asked Gov. Walz a single difficult question challenging his policies. Powerline’s Scott Johnson found out that only people who rent office space in the Capitol Building are invited to the briefings. That’s an efficient way of avoiding difficult questions. Why hasn’t the Strib, the Pi-Press or KSTP pinned Gov. Walz down on why they’re still experiencing a nursing home/LTC crisis? Why haven’t they forced Gov. Walz to explain why the model he’s using was thrown together over the weekend by grad students? That’s Three Stooges type of stuff. You can’t make this stuff up.

It breaks my heart to hear the owner of The Loop say “Get ready to hear more and more bankruptcies declared in the month of June. There’ll be a ton of them and that’s a shame. Shame on the Governor for what he did today. I’m sorry. That’s how I feel.”

Let’s be clear about this. Gov. Walz has done a terrible job limiting COVID deaths, especially in LTC facilities. Bankruptcies are up, especially within the hospitality industry. Shutting down the economy was meant to flatten the curve, not flatten Minnesota’s hospitality industry. If I were grading Gov. Walz’s failure during this crisis, he wouldn’t have to worry about grade inflation. I’d give him an F- or lower, if possible. By comparison, I’d give the Twin Cities Media a D- at best.

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