Marcie Bianco intended to lecture Americans throughout this op-ed. She tried lecturing us unsophisticated brutes from the Heartland when she wrote “liberty does not mean what you think it means.” Actually, Marcie, I think it’s you that doesn’t understand what liberty is.

In the second paragraph of the Declaration of Independence, the men who won our liberty wrote “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.–That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed…”

In Marcie’s words, “Liberty is a type of freedom defined and limited by civil society. It is not an unrestrained, unchecked license to do whatever one desires. Rather, liberty is a right constituted by the society — or, here, nation — one lives in.”

While it isn’t unreasonable to think that liberties are unlimited, it is unreasonable to think that liberty is defined only by society. While Bianco cites the Declaration of Independence, she wrote this:

And yet, as the quarantine protests make clear, a popular yet factually and legally inaccurate sentiment has infected the minds of many Americans. To paraphrase, it goes something like this: “This is America, and I am free to do whatever I want!”

That’s offensive. That isn’t what protesters have said. They’ve protested against tyrants like J.B. Pritzker and Gretchen Whitmer, Democrats who insist that it’s logical to say that it’s ok to shop at Walmart but that it’s dangerous to shop at a neighborhood hardware store. On the bright side, at least Democrats are accepting Walmart a little.

The belief that personal freedom is more valuable than the common good factors heavily in right-wing logic. And it has, particularly in the 21st century, been the strategic linchpin of right-wing efforts to squash social and economic justice movements, particularly through race-baiting, xenophobic rhetoric. Such rhetoric, which we are seeing starting to creep into anti-quarantine protests, is designed to stoke the fear of oppression in white American society.

I’ve watched tons of these protests. I don’t know what the hell she’s talking about. The first couple of protests were held in cars. I’d love hearing Ms. Bianco explain when she heard “xenophobic rhetoric.” Better yet, I’d love finding out which protests she attended where she heard xenophobic rhetoric. It’s quite possible that she’s assuming things that she doesn’t have proof for. Where is the xenophobic rhetoric at Karl Manke’s reopening?

The day after Manke reopened, vindictive Democrat Michigan Gov. Gretchen ‘The Witch’ Whitmer revoked Karl Manke’s license. Marcie, I’d love hearing you explain how The Witch’s vindictive action is a good-faith attempt at restoring Karl Manke’s liberty. It’s time to write Ms. Bianco’s article off as the rantings of a spoiled progressive fascist.

2 Responses to “The definition of liberty”

  • eric z says:

    An aspect of liberty is a woman having control of her body.

  • Gary Gross says:

    An aspect of liberty is a woman having control of her body.

    That’s true unless when that woman wants to return to work. Then her body belongs to dirtbags like de Blasio, Cuomo, Garcetti and Whitmer.

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