For those of you who haven’t paid attention to Scott Johnson’s investigation into Gov. Walz’s mishandling (my words, not Scott’s) of the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s time you started reading his work. This morning, Johnson published a post titled “Why the Minnesota shutdown?“. Included in Johnson’s post is a reply to a question he submitted to MDH, aka Minnesota Department of Health, Commissioner Jan Malcolm.

Johnson’s question said “Referring to the 286 total deaths to date, I note that every decedent under age 70 has died in long-term care or similar setting. The youngest person to die outside long-term care was in his 70’s. Why is it necessary to close the schools and shut down the state to protect the at-risk population?” The reply came “from MDH media contact Doug Schultz.” Here’s Schultz’s reply:

We have had deaths in people younger than 70 and certainly many cases in all age groups. It is necessary to take the community mitigation measures we have because all Minnesotans are at risk from COVID 19, as none of us has immunity. Some people, like those in long-term-care and those with underlying health conditions, are far more at risk than others. But if we didn’t reduce transmission in the community as we have with the stay at home order, we would see far more disease circulating and many times more serious cases that would quickly overwhelm our health care system. Then, even less-vulnerable people would not be able to get the care they needed, such as intensive care, ventilators, etc., so we would see far more deaths in people outside of the very frail and elderly. That is what has happened in places like Italy and New York.

Kevin Roche, “the former UnitedHealth Group general counsel and chief executive officer of its Ingenix division”, scrutinized Schultz’s statement. This jumped out at me:

“If we didn’t reduce transmission we would overwhelm the health system.” A flat-out lie. There is absolutely nothing that suggests we couldn’t provide adequate resources to treat those who need treatment.

I’m submitting these statistics to strengthen Mr. Roche’s already strong case:

ICU beds in use: 936
ICU beds: Current 1,244 Available within 24 hrs. — 795 Available within 72 hrs. — 542

Summarization: 936 ICU beds are in use out of 2,581 available. That represents approximately 36% of Minnesota’s ICU beds. In terms of ventilators in use vs. ventilators in inventory, MDH’s case is far weaker:

Ventilators in use: 463; currently in stock — 1,438; surge –1,435; on backorder 888

Summarization: 463 ventilators are in use out of a total 3,761 ventilators in stock or on backorder. That’s before potentially adding the 6,500 ventilators that are in stock but aren’t being used in Florida. That’s before factoring in other states’ ventilators not in use. FYI- 463 in use vs. 3,761 is approximately 12%.

For Mr. Schultz to say “If we didn’t reduce transmission we would overwhelm the health system” is outright dishonesty. It has nothing to do with reality. If a state can run out of ventilators when 12% of a state’s inventory is getting used, then someone needs to get fired.

The Mayo Clinic cut payroll for upper management by $1,600,000,000 recently because they’re at 35% of capacity. Additionally, Mayo just pushed Gov. Walz into an agreement on testing. Gov. Walz said he wouldn’t consider loosening restrictions until 5,000 tests per day could be performed. The next day, literally, Mayo said that they could run 10,000 per day.

Gov. Walz’s administration’s strategy has been to use dishonesty to frighten people into this lockdown. We can’t thank citizen journalists like Scott Johnson and Kevin Roche enough for flushing out the Walz administration’s fear-mongering tactics. They’re doing what the MSM isn’t willing to do.

One Response to “Scott Johnson, tireless investigator”

  • Gretchen L Leisen says:

    The concept that the current stay in place system is somehow helping to make health care more available to all people who need it, makes no sense. In fact, they have shut down the medical system except for outright emergencies – which they have control of as they are defining what is necessary health care. Many people would like to continue to see their physician/NP, but cannot do so. Can’t have special diagnostic tests either unless you are admitted to the hospital – which means that you have reached a state of emergency.

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