Apparently, Gov. Walz wants his legacy to be for needlessly shutting the state down. In that respect, he’s similar to Gov. Dayton, except that Gov. Dayton’s shutdown was from a budget shutdown. They’re similar from the standpoint that both were avoidable. Gov. Dayton eventually caved without getting what he wanted (tax increases).

Tim Walz is getting solid support from the DFL. They aren’t arguing with him needlessly shutting down the state until May 4. Here are the opening 2 paragraphs of the Strib article:

Gov. Tim Walz is extending a statewide stay-at-home order to May 4 to push the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic into the summer — and to buy time to allow hospitals to stock up on supplies and researchers to develop tests and treatments against the new coronavirus.

The existing two-week stay-at-home order has already put Minnesota on a trajectory for a lower rate of cases than states such as New York and Louisiana, where hospitals have struggled with a surge of severely ill patients, the governor said. Even so, projections suggest the state will either run short or barely have enough intensive care hospital beds, ventilators, masks and protective equipment for doctors and nurses to weather the expected caseload.

The truth is that there were 5 more COVID-19-related deaths yesterday. 4 of them happened in nursing homes. Further, “projections” have been virtually worthless, both here and nationwide. Relying on them is as reliable as throwing darts.

That doesn’t mean that COVID-19 isn’t serious. It is. It’s just that we can avoid COVID-19’s worst without shutting down Minnesota’s economy. This is another story of the dog that didn’t bark. What Gov. Walz hasn’t talked about is how well we’d be doing by just practicing proper social distancing.

This is disturbing:

The new order will expand that list and allow some workers to immediately return to jobs that don’t pose obvious risks of spreading the virus. Walz mentioned landscapers, for example, and said that he would be reviewing other businesses during the next month that also could reopen under certain conditions.

Those are jobs that shouldn’t have been halted in the first place. It’s most likely that, in his first crisis, Gov. Walz either panicked or blew it. Further, he hasn’t been well-served by his staff. Here’s an example:

“We’re not predicting a certain number of deaths will happen or won’t happen with these scenarios,” said Jan Malcolm, state health commissioner. “It’s directional. It’s all about helping us understand which levers have the biggest impact. And what the model confirms … is that the biggest levers really are building up ICU capacity and isolating the most vulnerable.”

How does sheltering-in-place impact nursing homes? Here are the things for which “Minnesotans may leave their residences”:

  1. Relocation to ensure safety, such as relocating to a different location if your home is unsafe due to domestic violence, sanitation, or reasons related to essential operations.
  2. Health and safety activities, such as obtaining emergency services or medical supplies.
  3. Outdoor activities, such as walking, hiking, running, biking, hunting, or fishing.
  4. Necessary supplies and services, such as getting groceries, gasoline, or carry-out.
  5. Essential intrastate and interstate travel, such as returning to a home from outside this state.
  6. Care of others, such as caring for a family member, friend, or pet in another household.
  7. Displacement, such as moving between emergency shelters if you are without a home.
  8. Moving or relocation, such as moving to a new home or place of residence.
  9. Voting, including all local and state elections.
  10. Funerals, providing that no more than ten attendees are gathered and strict social distancing is enforced.
  11. Tribal activities and lands, such as activities by members within the boundaries of their tribal reservation.

It’s apparent that Gov. Walz isn’t paying attention to the people. There are more signs that they’re ignoring his warnings.Apparently, Gov. Walz wants his legacy to be for needlessly shutting the state down. In that respect, he’s similar to Gov. Dayton, except that Gov. Dayton’s shutdown was from a budget shutdown. They’re similar from the standpoint that both were avoidable. Gov. Dayton eventually caved without getting what he wanted (tax increases).

Tim Walz is getting solid support from the DFL. They aren’t arguing with him needlessly shutting down the state until May 4. Here are the opening 2 paragraphs of the Strib article:

Gov. Tim Walz is extending a statewide stay-at-home order to May 4 to push the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic into the summer — and to buy time to allow hospitals to stock up on supplies and researchers to develop tests and treatments against the new coronavirus.

The existing two-week stay-at-home order has already put Minnesota on a trajectory for a lower rate of cases than states such as New York and Louisiana, where hospitals have struggled with a surge of severely ill patients, the governor said. Even so, projections suggest the state will either run short or barely have enough intensive care hospital beds, ventilators, masks and protective equipment for doctors and nurses to weather the expected caseload.

The truth is that there were 5 more COVID-19-related deaths yesterday. 4 of them happened in nursing homes. Further, “projections” have been virtually worthless, both here and nationwide. Relying on them is as reliable as throwing darts.

That doesn’t mean that COVID-19 isn’t serious. It is. It’s just that we can avoid COVID-19’s worst without shutting down Minnesota’s economy. This is another story of the dog that didn’t bark. What Gov. Walz hasn’t talked about is how well we’d be doing by just practicing proper social distancing.

This is disturbing:

The new order will expand that list and allow some workers to immediately return to jobs that don’t pose obvious risks of spreading the virus. Walz mentioned landscapers, for example, and said that he would be reviewing other businesses during the next month that also could reopen under certain conditions.

Those are jobs that shouldn’t have been halted in the first place. It’s most likely that, in his first crisis, Gov. Walz either panicked or blew it. Further, he hasn’t been well-served by his staff. Here’s an example:

“We’re not predicting a certain number of deaths will happen or won’t happen with these scenarios,” said Jan Malcolm, state health commissioner. “It’s directional. It’s all about helping us understand which levers have the biggest impact. And what the model confirms … is that the biggest levers really are building up ICU capacity and isolating the most vulnerable.”

How does sheltering-in-place impact nursing homes? Here are the things for which “Minnesotans may leave their residences”:

  1. Relocation to ensure safety, such as relocating to a different location if your home is unsafe due to domestic violence, sanitation, or reasons related to essential operations.
  2. Health and safety activities, such as obtaining emergency services or medical supplies.
  3. Outdoor activities, such as walking, hiking, running, biking, hunting, or fishing.
  4. Necessary supplies and services, such as getting groceries, gasoline, or carry-out.
  5. Essential intrastate and interstate travel, such as returning to a home from outside this state.
  6. Care of others, such as caring for a family member, friend, or pet in another household.
  7. Displacement, such as moving between emergency shelters if you are without a home.
  8. Moving or relocation, such as moving to a new home or place of residence.
  9. Voting, including all local and state elections.
  10. Funerals, providing that no more than ten attendees are gathered and strict social distancing is enforced.
  11. Tribal activities and lands, such as activities by members within the boundaries of their tribal reservation.

It’s apparent that Gov. Walz isn’t paying attention to the people. There are more signs that they’re ignoring his warnings.

One Response to “Gov. Walz’s strange explanation”

  • Chad Q says:

    What better way to blow $1.5 billion in over taxation than shutting down the state, doling out the money how you see fit instead of giving it back to taxpayers, and then coming back to the sheeple and saying you need more money. Never let a crisis go to waste.

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