FNC has called the Nevada Caucuses. It wasn’t close. Bernie Sanders is running away with the delegates and the raw vote totals. He’s almost tripling Joe Biden in both delegates to the Nevada Democrat State Convention and raw vote totals. Meanwhile, on the opposite end of the spectrum, Amy Klobuchar left Nevada and flew home to Minneapolis to speak at a rally. At the rally, Sen. “Klobuchar told her supporters at a rally in her native Minneapolis that she had once again ‘exceeded expectations’ in the race for the Democratic nomination as she tried to polish what entrance polling and initial results appear to indicate will be a finish outside the top tier in Nevada.”

That’s outright BS. Sen. Klobuchar finished in the low single digits percentage-wise, just ahead of some candidate named “undecided.” At the rally, Sen. Klobuchar said “I always note that a lot of people didn’t even think that I would still be standing at this point. They didn’t think I’d make it through that speech in the snow. They didn’t think I’d make it to the debate floor. But time and time again, because of all of you and because of the people around this country that want something different than the guy in the White House, we have won.”

Saying that finishing in the microscopic single-digits rates as exceeds expectations says that Sen. Klobuchar’s expectations were virtually nonexistent. Sen. Klobuchar’s schedule for tomorrow includes “rallies in North Dakota, Oklahoma, Arkansas and South Carolina.” She’ll be on the debate stage in South Carolina Tuesday night, then participate in South Carolina’s First-in-the-South Primary on Saturday.

The latest polling there shows Sen. Klobuchar finishing sixth:

After today’s finish, it’s difficult picturing Sen. Klobuchar making it past South Carolina. At the opposite end of the spectrum, Bernie is looking like a juggernaut. While it’s too early to say he’s the nominee, it isn’t too early to say that he’s the prohibitive frontrunner. Bernie leads in California by double-digits and barely trails Biden in Texas. If someone doesn’t win some states on Super Tuesday, then this race is essentially over. Doing well isn’t enough. At this point, moral victories won’t cut it. Finishing better than expectations is fine in Iowa and New Hampshire. To win the nomination, the candidate must win states, especially the biggest delegate-rich states.

That narrows things down to Bernie, perhaps Biden, Bloomberg, Buttigieg and Steyer. After that, it’s unrealistic.

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