Whether we’re talking about Eric Holder, Loretta Lynch or Sally Yates, we aren’t talking about people of integrity. Holder is the only US Attorney General to be held in contempt of Congress. In fact, the “vote was 255-67, with 17 Democrats voting in support of a criminal contempt resolution, which authorizes Republicans leaders to seek criminal charges against Holder.”

Loretta Lynch met with Bill Clinton to talk about their grandkids while she, coincidentally I’m sure, was investigating his wife. Sally Yates served as acting US Attorney General before getting terminated. Later, Jeff Sessions was confirmed as President Trump’s Attorney General. Yates was terminated because she “ordered Justice Dept. lawyers to stop defending Mr. Trump’s executive order banning new arrivals to the U.S. from seven Muslim-majority countries.” It’s worth noting that the Supreme Court eventually upheld President Trump’s executive order.

In this article, Ms. Yates wrote “The president has attempted to order up investigations of his perceived political enemies and enlist the department to protect his friends. With every blow, the wall of Justice independence has wobbled a bit more. This week, it teetered on the verge of collapse.”

That’s frightening, but predictable. It’s predictable because Ms. Yates was terminated for insubordination. She defied President Trump’s order to defend his travel ban, a ban that the Supreme Court upheld as constitutional. That’s the textbook case of insubordination or mutiny. Yates continued:

The facts are well known: After federal prosecutors in the Roger Stone case filed the department’s sentencing memorandum, the president publicly attacked Justice’s position as “horrible and very unfair.” He called for prosecution of the “real crimes … on the other side,” a mantra that has become so commonplace from him that it goes largely without comment. The prosecutors were ordered by Justice Department leadership to significantly cut their recommendation; they refused, and all four resigned from the case, with one quitting his job entirely.

What’s most disgusting is that Bill Barr, the properly confirmed Attorney General, overruled the rogue prosecutors, not President Trump. What’s next most disgusting is Ms. Yates’ insinuation that the so-called career prosecutors are pure-hearted people who play by the rules and only have America’s best interests at heart. That’s BS.

These prosecutors ignored what the Attorney General and the US Attorney for DC recommended for sentencing. Then these rogue prosecutors quit when their supervisors clipped their wings after the prosecutors recommended Roger Stone serve a prison sentence of 7-to-9 years. That’s twice the length that the average rapist in DC receives in that court.

I’d love hearing Ms. Yates justify why a first time offender who didn’t commit a violent crime should receive a 9-year sentence but a violent offender should get a 4 year sentence. Further, I’d love hearing Ms. Yates explain why she thinks it’s ok for prosecutors to ignore the orders of their supervisors. Frankly, if they hadn’t quit, I would’ve wished that Barr would’ve fired them. Check out the montage in this video:

Since Ms. Yates didn’t tell you what happened, Kim Strassel will:

Justice sources tell me that interim U.S. Attorney Tim Shea had told the department’s leadership he and other career officials in the office felt the proposed sentence was excessive. As the deadline for the filing neared, the prosecutors on the case nonetheless threatened to withdraw from the case unless they got their demands for these stiffest of penalties. Mr. Shea—new to the job—suffered a moment of cowardice and submitted to this ultimatum. The filing took Justice Department leaders by surprise, and the decision to reverse was made well before Mr. Trump tweeted, and with no communication with the White House. The revised filing, meanwhile, had the signature of the acting supervisor of the office’s criminal division, who is a career civil servant, not a political appointee.

In other words, the rogue prosecutors persecuted Mr. Stone because he’s a longtime political ally of President Trump. I’m not condoning what Stone did, though I don’t know that there shouldn’t be a mistrial due to the jury foreperson’s blatant bias. If he’s guilty of lying to Congress, then it’s proper for him to serve 2-3 years.

The DOJ can’t properly function without people of integrity who follow the rules. These prosecutors aren’t, in my opinion, people of integrity. They certainly didn’t follow the chain of command. President Trump tweeted after Bill Barr filed a new recommendation with the court. It’s impossible for President Trump to interfere after-the-fact.

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