Kim Strassel’s column this week take a bright sharpie and highlight John Brennan’s ulterior motives in spreading the Trump-Russia collusion storyline. Before getting into that, it’s important to highlight the fact that the FBI was politicized. Strassel did that early in her article.

That’s where she wrote “The Trump-Russia sleuthers have been back in the news, again giving Americans cause to doubt their claims of nonpartisanship. Last week, it was Federal Bureau of Investigation agent Peter Strzok testifying to Congress that he harbored no bias against a president he still describes as ‘horrible’ and ‘disgusting.’ This week, it was former FBI Director Jim Comey tweet-lecturing Americans on their duty to vote Democratic in November.”

John Solomon’s article casts serious doubt on Strzok’s credibility. That’s because he wrote “For any American who wants an answer sooner, there are just five words, among the thousands of suggestive texts Page and Strzok exchanged, that you should read. That passage was transmitted on May 19, 2017. ‘There’s no big there there,’ Strzok texted.” Considering the fact that Agent Strzok hates President Trump, it’s safe to say that there really isn’t much to the Mueller ‘investigation’.

I wrote here that calling Mueller’s endeavor an investigation is a stretch because it’s glaringly apparent that he hasn’t found anything against President Trump. If he had, he would’ve written the report and handed it to Congress so they could start pushing impeachment without hesitation.

That points us back to Mr. Brennan:

Mr. Brennan has taken credit for launching the Trump investigation. At a House Intelligence Committee hearing in May 2017, he explained that he became “aware of intelligence and information about contacts between Russian officials and U.S. persons.” The CIA can’t investigate U.S. citizens, but he made sure that “every information and bit of intelligence” was “shared with the bureau,” meaning the FBI. This information, he said, “served as the basis for the FBI investigation.” My sources suggest Mr. Brennan was overstating his initial role, but either way, by his own testimony, he as an Obama-Clinton partisan was pushing information to the FBI and pressuring it to act.

More notable, Mr. Brennan then took the lead on shaping the narrative that Russia was interfering in the election specifically to help Mr. Trump—which quickly evolved into the Trump-collusion narrative. Team Clinton was eager to make the claim, especially in light of the Democratic National Committee server hack. Numerous reports show Mr. Brennan aggressively pushing the same line internally. Their problem was that as of July 2016 even then-Director of National Intelligence James Clapper didn’t buy it. He publicly refused to say who was responsible for the hack, or ascribe motivation. Mr. Brennan also couldn’t get the FBI to sign on to the view; the bureau continued to believe Russian cyberattacks were aimed at disrupting the U.S. political system generally, not aiding Mr. Trump.

Earlier this week, Mr. Brennan emphatically said that President Trump’s statements at the Helsinki Summit rose to the level of “high crimes and misdemeanors” before saying that he considered President Trump’s words treasonous.

In this video, Alan Dershowitz emphatically stated that “You can’t just throw the term treason around”:

Apparently, Mr. Brennan hasn’t learned that lesson yet.

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