Earlier this week, I wrote about Speaker Daudt’s stinging criticism of Gov. Dayton in this post. I’m not surprised that I’m not the only one lining up to take a shot at Gov. Dayton. This morning, I got my copy of Harold Hamilton’s weekly commentary. Harold didn’t pull punches in this week’s end-of-session summation.

At the top of Harold’s commentary is his “Quote of the Week” section. The first quote, from Speaker Daudt, said “I can’t answer why Governor Dayton wasn’t engaged during session. He’ll have to answer those questions. His parking spot sits empty almost every day – he doesn’t even come to the Capitol. He hasn’t been engaged at all in his job here.” If Gov. Dayton wasn’t willing to do the work, he should’ve resigned so someone else could do the things needed to help Minnesotans.

The second quote also came from Speaker Daudt:

This session wasn’t a failure. Our governor was a failure.

The final quote is from Sen. Roger Chamberlain:

The governor is behaving like a toddler – emotional, impulsive, and unreasonable. It is just another part of his legacy of chaos and failure.

Gov. Dayton was poorly equipped for the job. His leadership skills were nonexistent. His temperament was terrible. His ability to work with others was nonexistent, too. What part of that ‘skillset’ sounds like he’s equipped to be governor? That isn’t the only criticism of Gov. Dayton in Hamilton’s commentary. Here’s more:

Once again, Dayton demonstrated that he really isn’t up to the job of being chief executive of the state. Thus, he leaves a legacy of failure, a legacy of failing to lead and unite a divided state. Beyond that, he has no legacy. He has no signature achievements he or his liberal brethren can brag up.

He can’t brag about MNLARS. On that, he might get tarred and feathered. The nursing home abuse scandal is a dark stain on his ‘humanitarian’ record because the Office of Health Facility Complaints investigated “just 1% of nearly 21,000 cases … through on-site investigations when facilities self-reported incidents.”

People died but Gov. Dayton didn’t instruct the OHFC to investigate. That either means that Gov. Dayton is a totally heartless SOB or that he’d checked out or both. When people die and the governor doesn’t fix things or, at minimum, he doesn’t pay attention, then he vetoes a bill that would’ve established protections, then the fault sits exclusively with Gov. Dayton. Only the executive branch runs things. The legislative branch passes policy bills and funds government. They don’t run things. Here’s the harshest, most accurate part of Hamilton’s commentary:

Once again, Dayton demonstrated that he really isn’t up to the job of being chief executive of the state. Thus, he leaves a legacy of failure, a legacy of failing to lead and unite a divided state. Beyond that, he has no legacy. He has no signature achievements he or his liberal brethren can brag up.

He is really left with only the dubious claim that presided over a massive increase in the state income tax, a sort of Holy Grail for liberals that visits upon the successful the misery of bearing their “fair share” of income taxes, which really means somewhere around 70% of the total burden.

Much like President Obama, Gov. Dayton isn’t an executive. They’re both executives in name only. Also like President Obama, Gov. Dayton’s legacy stands a good chance of getting wiped out by his successor.

Minnesota desperately needs a true executive who keeps the trains running on time. If Dayton didn’t show up, much less on time, how can we keep the trains running on time? Finally, it’s worth noting that Speaker Daudt typically is known as Mr. Calm, Cool and Collected. For him to go Vesuvius like he did Sunday and Wednesday, something serious must’ve bothered him.

One Response to “Speaker Daudt blasts Gov. Dayton”

  • Chad Q says:

    Sadly it doesn’t matter how much Daudt blasts Gov. Goofy because the media is still giving the deranged governor cover. There is still more than 1/2 of the state that thinks they imbecil is doing a good job too. Just read the comments on MPR or Minnpost whenever they write a story about the guy.

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