With all of the articles pontificating about the meaning of Karen Handel’s victory in Georgia’s Sixth District, it isn’t surprising that Newt Gingrich’s article provided the most enduring insight. Newt said “Meanwhile, Republicans rose to the challenge. Handel was their champion, and they went all out to win. I have a friend who lives in the district and visited every home in her neighborhood on Election Day to ensure not a single voter failed to turn out.”

While it’s true that this loss has to sting Democrats, it’s important not to overlook the blocking and tackling part of winning elections. Without enthusiastic foot soldiers making calls and knocking on doors, victories are harder to come by.

Footnote: This feels a lot like 2004 in that Democrats were fired up about John Kerry and put together a pretty good GOTV operation. What people didn’t talk about until after the election was that Republicans put together a pretty good GOTV operation, too, and defeated the Democrats’ GOTV operation.

It isn’t that Democrats weren’t fired up for this runoff. It’s that Republicans were pretty fired up, too. This shouldn’t be overlooked:

Throughout the race, the elite media was consistently negative, but Trump’s use of social media ended up reaching a larger audience than the three major networks combined. In Georgia, a similar situation occurred. The longer the race went on, the more vicious the leftwing media became, the more Handel grew, and the more Ossoff shrank.

I’m more than a little skeptical of this article. Here’s why:

In Washington, Representative Ben Ray Luján of New Mexico, the chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, moved to calm the party overnight, circulating a memo that outlined in detail how Democrats aim to capture a majority in 2018. In the document, which was sent to lawmakers and staff, Mr. Luján wrote that there was “no doubt that Democrats can take back the House next fall” in the midterm elections.

Acknowledging that the Georgia result was a setback, Mr. Luján wrote on Wednesday that there were between six and eight dozen seats held by Republican lawmakers that would be easier for Democrats to capture than Georgia’s Sixth. He said the next few months would become a “recruitment blitz” for Democrats as they enlist candidates in those elections.

“Let’s look outside of the traditional mold to keep recruiting local leaders, veterans, business owners, women, job creators and health professionals,” Mr. Luján wrote. “Let’s take the time to find people who fit their districts, have compelling stories, and work hard to earn support from voters.”

The hard left won’t like that. They aren’t looking for “people who fit their district.” They’re looking for the next Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren.

Footnote: this is a picture of Ben Ray Lujan, the man tasked with restoring Nancy Pelosi to her speakership:

First, I’m skeptical that there are between 75 and 100 seats across the U.S. that are easier for Democrats to win than Georgia’s Sixth. It’s more likely that there’s a maximum of 25 toss-up districts in the entire U.S. This sounds more like Lujan attempting to entice reluctant politicians into being willing to run in 2018. Further, it takes a wave election to have that many competitive districts in an election cycle.

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