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Liz Mair’s article strongly hints that the DFL would hold Sen. Franken’s seat if Sen. Franken resigned as a result of this ethics scandal. In her article, Mair wrote “It just so happens that Minnesota has a lot of Democratic women who could make for viable Franken replacements; at least six, depending on who you ask. One is Minnesota Lt. Gov. Tina Smith. Another is Attorney General Lori Swanson. A third is State Auditor Rebecca Otto. A fourth is state House Minority Leader Melissa Hortman. A fifth is Rep. Betty McCollum. And a sixth is former state House Majority Leader Erin Murphy.”

Mair isn’t wrong that each of these women would be viable candidates in the eyes of DFL activists. The thing that Ms. Mair is missing is the fact that these candidates have in common is that they’re from the Metro. In the eyes of rural Minnesota, especially the Iron Range, these women would be rejected like Hillary was rejected. In fact, I’d posit that they’d get rejected worse than Hillary was in 2016.

Trump won the Eighth District with 53.76% of the vote to Hillary’s 38.27%. None of these candidates would do that well on the Range. Further, most of these candidates favor single-payer health care.

Meanwhile, Republicans have 2 candidates that would be able to run well in the suburbs, the exurbs & rural Minnesota. If Stewart Mills or Kurt Daudt were to run, they’d be favored because they both support the Iron Range, they both support the construction unions and they’re both seen as sensible policymakers.

The DFL’s biggest problem is that they’re the urban party, which helped them win statewide races in the past. That’s coming to an end because farmers and unions are abandoning the DFL because of the DFL’s hostility towards building pipelines, approving mining projects and Gov. Dayton’s hostility towards farmers. The sad part for the DFL is that Gov. Dayton is sensible compared with the 6 ladies mentioned earlier.

If Sen. Franken resigns, which looks more possible each week, Gov. Dayton will have a difficult decision. It’ll take quite a bit to wash the bitter taste of Sen. Franken out of people’s mouth:

At the end of the day, I’d put the DFL’s chances of holding Sen. Franken’s seat as a toss-up.

Is Doug Jones toast in Alabama? While it’s too early to answer that question affirmatively, it isn’t too early to say that Donald Trump’s statements about Jones didn’t help Jones’ campaign. Specifically, President Trump said “We don’t need a liberal person in there, a Democrat, Jones. I’ve looked at his record. It’s terrible on crime. It’s terrible on the border. It’s terrible on military. I can tell you for a fact we do not need somebody who’s going to be bad on crime, bad on borders, bad for the military, bad for the Second Amendment.”

That’s a pretty good signal to Alabama Republicans to stop thinking about staying home or voting for Doug Jones. That’s a good start but it isn’t enough by itself to defeat Jones. What this represents, though, is a turning point. Moore has to focus his campaign on bread-and-butter conservative issues like the Second Amendment, being pro-life and cutting taxes.

Jones has done better-than-expected thus far because it’s been a personality-driven race. It hasn’t been about Jones’ support for partial-birth abortion and gun control. Jones peddled the notion that he’s a moderate. Appearing on Outnumbered today, Guy Benson blew that storyline to smithereens:

If Moore can convince enough Alabama Republicans to turn out, he’ll defeat Jones. I’ve thought from the start that Jones’ support was more about trying to convince Moore to drop out than it was about supporting Jones. It’ll be interesting to see how Alabama voters react to Trump’s criticism of Jones.
Guy wasn’t finished beating up the Democrats:

Here’s his exchange with Zac Petkanas:

GB: I understand why you’d be on a high horse, morally, about this because sometimes there are very bright distinctions when it comes to politics. But I would challenge you — maybe not directly, but a lot of Democrats — if Bill Clinton were up for election again…let’s say he ran for president and were the nominee in 2020. He was credibly accused of forcible rape. Would they vote for him over a Ted Cruz? I think history shows the answer is ‘yes.’
ZP: Look, I was 15 years old when Bill Clinton left office. That’s the age when Roy Moore goes after most of his girls…
GB: That’s a fair shot…
ZP: So I can’t speak to that, however I…
GB: Would you vote for Bill Clinton if he ran again?
ZP: I think that all of these women need to be believed, and that we need to hold everybody accountable, whether it’s Al Franken or whether it’s John Conyers, or whether it’s Bill Clinton, or whether it’s Donald Trump.
GB: So you wouldn’t vote for Bill Clinton for president against Ted Cruz?
ZP: Would you vote for Donald Trump?
GB: I didn’t. Your question. Back to you.

As you saw in the video, Guy’s final reply all but officially finished that debate.

It’s rather disgusting that liberals are attacking Leeann Tweeden. This LTE is to-the-point. It simply says “In response to the compromising photo of U.S. Sen. Al Franken, internet-aware readers can become a bit more informed about Franken’s ‘victim’ by Googling her and clicking on ‘images.'” There are multiple pictures showing Ms. Tweeden wearing a bikini.

Is this liberal trying to insinuate that Ms. Tweeden isn’t a victim because she used to be a swimsuit model? That’s apparently the message he’s sending by putting victim in air quotes. Here’s a question for the disgusting liberal who wrote this trashy LTE. Do you think that being a sexy swimsuit model means you can’t truly be a victim of sexual harassment? That’s what he’s inferring.

It’s clear that Democrats are circling their wagons around Sen. Franken. Apparently, they’re thinking that he’s a dirtbag but he’s the Democrats’ dirtbag. Apparently, they’re willing to fight for Franken’s vote in the Senate. Apparently, character doesn’t matter to Democrats.

Finally, I return to the LTE suggesting that a woman who posed for this picture can’t be the victim of sexual harassment:

One look at this picture suggests that it’s possible to be a victim:

Sen. Dave Senjem isn’t happy with the Minnesota Supreme Court’s ruling that Gov. Dayton was within his rights to veto the Legislature’s funding. That’s why he’s proposing putting a constitutional amendment on the 2018 ballot.

Because the legislature decides whether constitutional amendments are allowed on the ballot, Gov. Dayton doesn’t have a say in the matter. Further, this should frighten rural DFL legislators. Republicans should highlight the fact that this constitutional amendment is required because a) Gov. Dayton vetoed the funding and b)the Supreme Court got their ruling badly wrong. The first vote taken by the House will be to override Gov. Dayton’s line-item veto of the Legislature’s funding. If DFL legislators vote to sustain Gov. Dayton’s veto, they’ll be tarred and feathered and it’ll be deserved.

Sen. Senjem made a good point when he said “We’re not co-equal anymore because I believe the precedent has been set that yes, it’s OK for a governor to veto legislative appropriations, and there are no consequences, and I think that puts the Legislature in almost a subservient position.”

The Supreme Court got this wrong. Thanks to that ruling, the legislature has 2 terrible choices. Either they can cave to the governor’s demands or they can stop representing their constituents. Actually, there’s a third option. That third option is to spend down the money appropriated for the operation of the Legislative Auditor’s Office and the Revisor of Statutes’ office.

Spending down the money that’s supposed to run the OLA is terrible because they’re the state equivalent of the IG at the federal level. Should we shut down the office that caught April Todd-Malmlov mismanaging MNsure? Should we shut down the office that caught Ted Mondale and Michelle Kelm-Helgen using luxury suites at U.S. Bank Stadium to entertain friends, political allies and family?

It’s time to put this constitutional amendment on the ballot. It’s time to shame these Supreme Court justices for getting the decision wrong.

According to this article, Sen. Dan Schoen and Rep. Tony Cornish will resign soon, with Sen. Schoen resigning Wednesday and Rep. Cornish leaving ” on or before Dec. 1.”

According to the article “House Speaker Kurt Daudt and Majority Leader Joyce Peppin say they asked Cornish to resign.” It then added a statement, saying “We asked Representative Tony Cornish to offer his resignation from the Minnesota House of Representatives. Over the last week, it has become increasingly clear his resignation is the most appropriate course of action for him, his constituents, and our institution. As House leaders, we will continue to take concrete steps to combat misconduct at the legislature and ensure a safe and respectful work environment for legislators, staff, lobbyists, and the public.”

Cornish released his own statement, saying “As a proud former peace officer and longtime champion for public safety, I am forced to face the reality that I have made some at the Capitol feel uncomfortable, and disrespected. To those individuals and specifically the unnamed lobbyist , I sincerely apologize for my unwelcome behavior. “I would also like to apologize to God, my family, my constituents, and friends for the mistakes I have made. After having conferred with family members, friends and advisors, it is with deep regret tonight that I am announcing my intention to resign from the Minnesota House of Representatives. I do so after reaching an agreement in principle with the unnamed lobbyist that has been mentioned. The agreement is basically that I offer the enclosed apology, and resign from my office, on or before December, 1st 2017 and that we both provide each other with a mutual release of any claims against each other now and in the future.”

John Palmer, a professor emeritus at St. Cloud State, is getting city officials’ attention by participating in discussions that might lead to recalling members of the City Council.

According to the article, a “group of about 15 St. Cloud residents is planning to study the possible recall of elected officials after the ‘continued denial on the part of the City Council and (a)dministration of problems created by the actions of Lutheran Social (Service) of Minnesota’s resettlement of refugees into the city,’ according to St. Cloud resident John Palmer.”

Thanks to the City Council’s arrogance, the citizens are getting fed up. When Councilman Johnson announced that he’d be bringing a resolution up for debate, he made sure each member of the council had a copy of the resolution well in advance. When Jeff Goerger presented his resolution for debate, it was sprung on Councilman Johnson during that meeting.

Each time Councilman Johnson responded to his constituents’ calls for additional information on the costs associated with refugees, Mayor Kleis, the City Council and the County did their best to stonewall him. What these citizens didn’t notice (either that or they just tried ignoring them) is that there’s a substantial following that are worried about the financial impact refugees are having on their city and their schools. If these city councilmembers don’t start listening, they’ll get fired the next time that they’re up for re-election.

Palmer has attended the last few council meetings and study sessions, and has offered to speak about Robert’s Rules of Order, on which the council’s rules of order is based. “The common element is to get answers about the cost to society relative to resettlement of refugees,” Palmer said, adding that it frustrates the group’s members that “none of the elected officials in the area appear to have an interest” in studying the costs.

While Mayor Kleis says that there isn’t a cost associated with refugees, other argue the opposite. Don Casey stated “No one even knows for sure how many Somali refugees live in St. Cloud (or this metro area). All we know is Lutheran Social Services has settled a little more than 1500 — a fraction of the actual count because the majority are secondary refugees who resettled here from other communities in the U.S. (Johnson’s resolution didn’t deal with secondary settlers.)”

Casey’s argument is that it’s impossible to know the costs so we shouldn’t try getting to know how much it costs. What he’s essentially saying is that we shouldn’t care how much something costs if the government tries to hide the costs from taxpayers. That’s stupid.

This past weekend, there was an event where it was discussed whether there was a possibility of a repeat of the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II. The question this time was whether this might happen to Somali refugees. After reading this article, it isn’t difficult to picture these panelists as propagandists.

I’m confident they’re propagandists because the article starts by saying “As they say, those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it. A panel of experts in St. Cloud is trying to prevent that. At an event at the St. Cloud Public Library on Saturday, the group will discuss the infamous presidential Executive Order 9066. The order allowed the incarceration of Japanese-Americans during World War II. Panelists will also discuss how U.S. history relates to today’s anti-immigration policies and a rise in Islamophobia.”

The minute I read the italicized sentence, I knew CAIR was involved with this event. That was verified when the Times reporter wrote that “The event was organized by the Minnesota chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, or CAIR-MN, and the Twin Cities chapter Japanese-American Citizens’ League. CAIR is the largest Muslim civil liberties and advocacy organization in the U.S. The group hopes to enhance understanding of Islam and protect civil liberties.”

That sentence is always included in any article that mentions CAIR. Actually, CAIR is more accurately described as an unindicted co-conspirator in the Holy Lands Foundation trial. A federal jury ruled that the Holy Land Foundation “was convicted on 10 counts of conspiracy to provide, and the provision of, material support to a designated foreign terrorist organization; 11 counts of conspiracy to provide, and the provision of, funds, goods and services to a Specially Designated Terrorist; and 10 counts of conspiracy to commit, and the commission of, money laundering.” But I digress.

Here’s the rationalization for the event:

Organizers say the panel is especially timely given a recent attempt by a St. Cloud City Council member to pass a moratorium on refugee resettlement in St. Cloud. The measure failed with a vote of six to one, with council member Jeff Johnson as the only yes vote. The council then reaffirmed a resolution they passed a few weeks before saying St. Cloud is a welcoming community.

Talk about spin/propaganda. There’s nothing in Councilman Johnson’s resolution that would’ve violated anyone’s civil liberties. The thought that CAIR-MN would attempt to connect the Japanese internment of World War II with Councilman Johnson’s resolution says everything about CAIR’s motivations.

CAIR’s dishonesty is showing. The definition of internment is “the state of being interned; confinement.” The definition of moratorium is “a suspension of activity.” This is classic CAIR fearmongering. There isn’t a chance of Somali refugees getting put into confinement.

This is part of a campaign of propaganda. This LTE is filled with dishonesty. Check out this paragraph:

For the second time in two weeks, the St. Cloud City Council Nov. 6 overwhelmingly rejected council member Jeff Johnson’s controversial moratorium on refugee resettlement. Twice now only Johnson has voted for his moratorium. Plus, after intense deliberation, the council Oct. 23 approved a resolution declaring the city a “just and welcoming community.”

I watched the Oct. 23 City Council meeting. They didn’t have a lengthy discussion on Councilman Jeff Goerger’s resolution. Jeff Johnson was the only person who spoke in opposition to Councilman Goerger’s resolution. During his presentation, Councilman Johnson quoted from the Refugee Act of 1980. There wasn’t any mention of religion during Councilman Johnson’s presentation. It focused on the relationship between the federal government, the local government and the placing agency.

To hear the propagandists from CAIR explain what happened that night, you’d think that hordes of angry white people had told reporters that they wanted to drive Somali refugees from St. Cloud. That didn’t happen. Simply put, the CAIR propagandists are totally dishonest. Their propaganda shouldn’t be tolerated.

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Recently, I’ve written a few times that MnSCU (now renamed Minnesota State) hasn’t earned taxpayers’ trust. I don’t see a reason why I should change that opinion. Steve Rosenstone, the man who led MnSCU from 2011-2017, was an abject failure. This article chronicles some of Rosenstone’s failings.

For instance, during “his first five years, he’s clashed with faculty unions and faced scrutiny over a lack of transparency.” Also, Rosenstone’s “signature project, Charting the Future”, was hampered by “a secretive $2 million consulting contract with McKinsey & Co. undermined the effort when both faculty unions in 2014 stopped participating for four months.” As a result, faculty “groups at all seven state universities that year voted ‘no confidence’ in Rosenstone.”

The most damning incident in Chancellor Rosenstone’s history was how he signed his contract extension:

Rosenstone’s current employment contract also was approved in relative secrecy. Only the board chairman signed it in 2013, and some trustees didn’t know about it until the Pioneer Press reported on the contract eight months later.

Trust me when I say that didn’t go over well with the faculty. Why trust people that specialize in secrecy? Isn’t it impossible to trust secretive people?

The fact that each of the faculty associations voted a vote of ‘No Confidence’ in Chancellor Rosenstone is disturbing. Equally disturbing is the fact that several student senates voted a vote of no confidence, too. In those votes, it was cited that Rosenstone treated the students dismissively. It’s one thing to disagree with someone’s point of view. It’s another to treat them like their opinions didn’t matter.

There’s an interim chancellor running Minnesota State. Before he was the interim chancellor of the whole system, he was the interim president of Metropolitan State University. Prior to that, he was the failed provost at St. Cloud State. While he was provost, he tried hiding a transcript scandal from the faculty. It’s impossible to trust people who try hiding things like that from the faculty.

Frankly, it’s time to throw the interim chancellor under the proverbial bus. The trustees should scrap the search committee for the next president at St. Cloud State, too. The people of St. Cloud would do a much better job than that search committee will do. St. Cloud State must do better than getting another cookie-cutter president that’s as incompetent as the last president. This video explains why St. Cloud residents shouldn’t trust MnSCU’s pick as St. Cloud State’s next president:

Diversity is a positive thing but it shouldn’t be the primary focus. Excellence should be. Further, MnSCU spent $2,000,000 on a consultant who told them to rebrand the system and to change their system name to Minnesota State. No offense to Craig T. Nelson but that won’t inspire anyone to attend one of MnSCU’s universities.

The St. Cloud Times just published my LTE about St. Cloud State. I still firmly believe that the leader that the University needs to turn things around lives in St. Cloud right now.

Also, I’m 100% confident that what’s needed most is leadership. St. Cloud State doesn’t need another do-nothing executive picked by a team of cronies. As I said in my LTE, MnSCU hasn’t earned the benefit of any doubt. What’s needed is a person with a plan and an understanding of where the political traps are set. Rest assured, too, that there are more than a few traps set on campus.

I’ve written extensively about St. Cloud State the past 2+ weeks and the last 5+ years. Check out the LTE to read my recommendations. There’s a lot in there that would help the University get turned around.

Mike Rothman has announced his immediate resignation as commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Commerce. In a separate statement, Rothman announced that he will run for the job of Minnesota Attorney General.

MPR’s Tim Pugmire is reporting “Mike Rothman is stepping down as commissioner of the Minnesota Department Commerce and plans to run for state attorney general. Rothman announced his intentions Friday in a resignation letter to Gov. Mark Dayton.”

In his statement, Rothman said “Thank you for the incredible opportunity to serve the people of Minnesota. You placed great trust in me – and every day, I dedicated myself to fulfilling that trust by doing my very best to improve the lives of Minnesotans. I am very proud of what we have been able to accomplish together.”

Frankly, Rothman was a failure because he was anti-commerce and because he did his utmost to kill the Line 3 Pipeline replacement project. Simply put, he’s an environmental activist. Imagine the destruction he could cause as Minnesota’s Attorney General. That’s a frightening thought.

In his statement, Gov. Dayton said “For nearly seven years, Mike Rothman has devoted himself to protecting consumers, improving the lives of Minnesotans, and ensuring fair regulatory environments for Minnesota’s businesses.” Rep. Kelly Fenton wasn’t that kind, saying “Commissioner Rothman’s tenure was stained by his failure to protect Minnesota consumers and tax dollars. His poor judgment is well documented.”

This KSTP article contains information that Pugmire’s article doesn’t have:

The news comes as the Office of the Legislative Auditor confirmed it had been asked to investigate actions taken by various DOC officials in connection to an investigation into an auto glass company a federal judge ruled was ‘unjustified.’ “As you may know, the case has involved considerable litigation that continues in process,” legislative auditor James Nobles wrote in an email to KSTP. “The case is very complex, and we are reviewing all of the documents related to the legal proceedings at both the state and federal levels.

“In sum, we are at a preliminary stage, and our review will undoubtedly take us into next year. So, yes, we are investigating what happened in the Commerce/Safelight case.” In that case, federal judge Susan Nelson ruled the DOC carried out an “unjustified” investigation into Safelite Auto Glass for its billing practices with insurance companies.

Nelson also said the DOC “initiated a baseless investigation against Safelite based on financially-motivated complaints from competitors.” Further, Nelson said there was testimony from a DOC employees stating “an assistant commissioner made a ‘deal’ to provide information on Safelite in order to ‘get Safelite out of Minnesota.'”

The last thing Minnesota needs is a crooked AG. That being said, Rothman wouldn’t be the first crooked Minnesota AG. Mike Hatch blazed that trail long ago.

Gov. Dayton’s statement is predictable. It’s also BS. Here’s why:

In December 2011, Minnesota Commerce Commissioner Mike Rothman and Community Action of Minneapolis CEO Bill Davis stood side-by-side at a press conference to plead for more federal money to help low-income people pay their heating bills. As the pair made their case in front of the cameras, however, staffers inside the Commerce Department were struggling to figure out how Davis’ nonprofit had already misspent more than $1 million in energy funds.

Commerce analysts had grown increasingly alarmed that money meant to aid the poor was going to people who were not eligible to receive it. Those staffers, who requested anonymity because they aren’t authorized to speak, say the red flags raised in 2011 were the first alerting Rothman that Davis, his DFL political ally, was mismanaging money from the energy assistance fund run by Commerce. The warnings, they say, were repeated over the years but went nowhere. Rothman would not sever ties with Community Action. Several in the department say they were told the contracts would continue because “the political ramifications are greater than staff would understand,” a characterization Rothman does not dispute.

Gov. Dayton, how can you say that Commissioner Rothman protected consumers or improved Minnesotans’ lives while ignoring Community Action of Minneapolis’ outright corruption? These DFL thieves stole money meant to pay poor people’s heating bills.

Instead of paying poor people’s heating bills, Community Action paid for a trip to New York City for State Sen. Jeffrey Hayden and his wife. They’ve since repaid the money.

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