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Monday, I wrote this post to highlight Gov. Dayton’s statement on the Baton Rouge assassinations. Gov. Dayton said “The terrible murder of three law enforcement officers in Baton Rouge shocks the conscience of every decent-minded American. I renew my plea for all Minnesotans to engage only in peaceful and lawful ways to exercise their First Amendment rights. This is our opportunity to help lead the nation away from this wanton, mass violence and toward a reconciliation and healing.”

While it’s true that Gov. Dayton’s tone in this statement was conciliatory, let’s not forget that Gov. Dayton also accused a Hispanic police officer of racism by saying “Would this have happened if driver and the passenger have been white? I don’t think so.”

Don’t let Gov. Dayton’s latest public statements fool you. Gov. Dayton accused a Hispanic police officer of being a racist. In her speech to the NAACP Convention, Hillary Clinton said “Americans need to do a better job of listening when African-Americans talk about the seen and unseen barriers you face every day. We need to recognize our privilege and practice humility rather than assume that our experiences are everyone’s experiences. We all need to try, as best we can, to walk in one another’s shoes, to imagine what it would be like to our son or daughter down and have the talk.”

Whether it’s Gov. Dayton accusing police officers of being racists or whether it’s Mrs. Clinton talking about white privilege, Democrats talk the language of victimization to minorities, especially African-Americans.

Gov. Dayton’s political allies at TakeAction Minnesota hinted that white people are racists in this letter:

Last week, we shared our reflections on the tragic death of Philando Castile, Alton Sterling and countless other black people, as well as other people of color, at the hands of the police. We were amazed by the overwhelming amount of people like you who recognize this injustice and are ready to act.

You know more than anyone that the time to show up, to be in solidarity, to act for the movement of black lives is NOW. We must take action against the structural racism plaguing our state and entire country. A racism that shows up in our policing as systemic violence, in the public education system that fail students of color, and in every other facet of our communities.

Here are a couple immediate ways you can join the fight right away:

In the Twin Cities tomorrow? We’re joining the educators from the Saint Paul Federation of Teachers, the Minneapolis Federation of Teachers, Neighborhoods Organizing for Change & other black leaders hitting the streets to demand justice for #PhilandoCastile and for Black lives across the country.

Can’t make the march, but still want to act? Sign this petition to call on St. Paul County Attorney Choi to turn over the investigation on the murder of Philando Castile into the hands of an independent special prosecutor.

Police violence and structural racism are literally costing the lives of people of color and ultimately, both of these forces impact all of us in varying ways, but they do and will take all of us to create change. As a white father, whose children are in the St. Paul Public Schools, the tragic death of Philando Castile is a terrifying reminder that the educators who care so much for my children are not safe themselves – and that’s unacceptable. We can’t stress this enough. That’s why we’ll be there tomorrow, and we want to see you.

It isn’t difficult to understand what’s happening. In public, Gov. Dayton and Mrs. Clinton sound like us. The minute they’re with their special interest friends, though, they start accusing people of being racists. Personally, I can’t trust someone who changes what they say depending on which audience they’re speaking to.

Mrs. Clinton’s divisiveness is off-putting and unattractive. Couple that with her lack of trustworthiness and you have a legitimate reason not to trust her with the keys to the Oval Office.

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Pat Buchanan has been an isolationist for decades. He’s a natural fit for Donald Trump. Buchanan’s also a longtime political hack, which explains why he’s turned into a Trump apologist. This column offers examples of Buchanan’s limited intellect and his substantial dishonesty in the cause of Trump.

It’s breathtakingly dishonest for Buchanan to say “Stated succinctly, Donald Trump said U.S. District Judge Gonzalo Curiel, who is presiding over a class-action lawsuit against Trump University, is sticking it to him. And the judge’s bias is likely rooted in the fact that he is of Mexican descent.” Apparently, it hasn’t dawned on Buchanan that Curiel’s rulings are terrible because he’s liberal, not Mexican.

Buchanan also asked “Before the lynching of the Donald proceeds, what exactly was it he said about that Hispanic judge?” Specifically, Trump said “I have a judge that is a hater of Donald Trump. A hater. He’s a hater. His name is Gonzalo Curiel.” During an interview this past weekend with CNN’s Jake Tapper, Trump said “He’s a Mexican. We’re building a wall between here and Mexico. The answer is he is giving us very unfair rulings, rulings that people can’t even believe.”

Apparently, Mr. Buchanan is willing to ignore Trump’s bigotry. It’s clear that Trump’s statements to Jake Tapper highlight (lowlight?) Trump’s bigotry. This statement is breathtakingly stupid:

The judiciary is independent, but that does not mean that federal judges are exempt from the same robust criticism as presidents or members of Congress.

The Sixth Amendment guarantees the right to a fair trial. When a presidential candidate attacks a judge, he’s attempting to tip the scales of justice. There’s nothing fair about that. Buchanan should know better. I suspect he knows that. I also think that Buchanan knows that presidents and presidential candidates have to be careful in not doing anything to tip the scales of justice.

Pat Buchanan is a fossil from a bygone political era. He should leave the arena of ideas because he’s a has been.

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Friday night, I watched David Wohl debate Guy Benson about Donald Trump’s bigoted statements about Judge Curiel. I watched in amazement because Trish Regan, who was guest-hosting for Megyn Kelly, brought up the question that Trump had attacked Judge Curiel to take attention away from his Trump University lawsuits.

Wohl seemed to think that was possible. If that was Trump’s strategy, it was an exceptionally foolish strategy. The Trump University lawsuits essentially accuse Trump of being a crook, promising people a path to riches if they just followed the Trump blueprint for success.

Trump’s statement that Judge Curiel hated Trump because Trump is promising to build a wall on the US-Mexican border is outright bigotry. It isn’t brilliant to call attention to your bigotry rather than your dishonesty. Trump is hoping that he can increase turnout of lower-income white people. It’s as if Trump thinks he can win by winning the bigot vote. The thing is that there aren’t enough bigots in enough states for Trump to win.

Had Trump been smart, he would’ve accused the judge of being appointed by President Obama. Had he done that, he would’ve taken attention away from being accused of being a crook and put the spotlight on Obama’s judges

To hear the St. Cloud Times talk about it, you’d think that St. Cloud residents are the vilest of bigots. While this LTE wasn’t written by the Times’ Editorial Board, it certainly uses the language the Board uses. It assumes that “white cultural norms” are automatically racist. They aren’t.

Prof. Tripp wrote that “But these racial incidents are merely symptoms of institutional racism in the St. Cloud public school system, a system that operates on white cultural norms, which are reinforced by a white standard code of student conduct. The rules are enforced in a racially biased way to exclude many black youth from the public school system.” It’s worth questioning Prof. Tripp’s judgment in this matter, especially considering the fact that he’s a professor in the “Racial Issues Colloquium” at St. Cloud State.

A quick perusal of the Racial Issues Colloquium website reveals that “the Racial Issues Colloquium comprises faculty from the College of Liberal Arts and School of Education committed to providing courses that offer students a critical analysis of the effects of racism, discrimination and oppression in the lives of African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans and Chicano/as in the United States.”

That sounds like an interesting description. Unfortunately, there’s no indication that these concepts/principles can be objectively defined. Without objective definitions, this is just a bunch of words that don’t have a meaning. There’s more to this subject than just this. See Part II this afternoon.

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According to this KSTP article, the Republican Party of Minnesota is terminating a “social media manager” is being fired for referring to a “Negro problem” on Twitter. Predictably, DFL Party Chair Ken Martin called the comments “racist and bigoted”. Martin expressed outrage even though the person who published the tweet is getting terminated.

Rather than defending that offensive comment, I’ll simply highlight the fact that the DFL doesn’t have the right to take the moral high ground on this issue. I wrote this post after the Supreme Court’s ruling on the Voting Rights Act. It’s helpful to highlight the fact that the DFL has racists, too. That’s because Rep. Ryan Winkler was a rising star in the DFL up until that morning. Prior to the morning that the Supreme Court issued its ruling, Rep. Winkler was a leading candidate for Secretary of State. After that ruling, Winkler thought he’d get a little cute with his tweets. That’s why he published this tweet:

Winkler thought that it was clever to call Clarence Thomas an “Uncle Thomas.” When Winkler graduated from college, his degree was in history. That’s noteworthy because Winkler’s non-apology apology said that he didn’t “did not understand ‘Uncle Tom’ as a racist term, and there seems to be some debate about it.” Nobody with common sense believes that Winkler didn’t know that Uncle Tom was a pejorative.

Shortly after posting that tweet, Rep. Winkler issued a statement saying that he was withdrawing his name from consideration to be the DFL-endorsed candidate for Secretary of State. Since then, Rep. Winkler resigned from the legislature.

The point is that the DFL is just as capable of being a bigot as the Republicans are.

This past Saturday, the DFL and Zach Dorholt staged a protest against racism. This St. Cloud Times article didn’t even get the basics right. To reporter Ben Rodgers’ credit, he was right in saying that this fake protest was held at “the Stearns County Courthouse.” After that, facts weren’t part of Mr. Rodgers neighborhood.

Rodgers wrote that Dorholt, the DFL and the AFL-CIO gathered “to protest an anti-immigration speaker who visited St. Cloud.” They identified that “anti-immigration speaker” as Bob Enos. It’s fiction to call Mr. Enos anti-immigration. I wrote about Mr. Enos in this post. I included a video of his presentation to the Willmar City Council in the post. Mr. Enos’ presentation was solely about the federal refugee resettlement program. Specifically, he was worried that this ‘federal’ program was stretching the budgets of state and local agencies. It’s a legitimate thing to worry about.

Here’s the video of Mr. Enos’ presentation:

Jane Conrad admitted that Mr. Enos isn’t anti-immigration:

Jane Conrad, a field representative for the East Central Area Labor Council, planned the rally after Bob Enos, of Willmar, appeared at an event booked at the Veterans of Foreign Wars speaking out against refugees and Sharia, the Islamic law.

Here’s part of Enos’ presentation to the Willmar City Council:

We’ve been working on an issue that’s become pretty important to us which has to do with the subject of the resettlement of political refugees around the world and how that affects our counties particularly. I don’t know if you’ve had any briefings on this matter but back in November, the coordinator for the refugee resettlement program for the state of Minnesota in St. Paul requested the director of Family Services here at the County to organize a meeting that took place over a couple of days. Twenty people attended from 3 county agencies, the Willmar School District as well as city hall. The Mayor-elect was there. A couple of vice presidents from Jenny O were there. The subject of the meeting had to do with migration of refugees to Kandiyohi County. We’re used to thinking of the refugee issue in terms of those that are leaving the refugee camps in east Africa and winding up on our shores and going out to the cities and the counties.

The big issue lately that we can’t seem to get a handle on very easily, particularly from a financial planning standpoint, and that has to do with the secondary relocation of refugees from other states around the country. The most recent data that we’re seeing now from the State of Minnesota, specifically from the Department of Health, now tells us that of every city and town, the city that is attracting the most refugees is Minneapolis. The city that’s attracting the second-most refugees is Willmar, not St. Paul, not Bloomington, not St. Cloud, Mankato, Worthington. Willmar.

We suspect that, for the most part, most of this has to do with family re-unification but, best guess, there’s a number of factors contributing to this. What we’re seeing is the Somali community, in particular, is such a size and critical mass, that that critical mass is, in and of itself, the primary magnet for refugees coming here from Atlanta, California and Texas. The last time we knew, we were looking at a number roughly of 2,000 or roughly 10% of our population. We know that’s quite conservative.

I’ve been to 2 other meetings subsequent to the meeting held in November. One was held out in St. Cloud and was sponsored by Lutheran Social Services organization, which in Minnesota, is called the # 1 volunteer agency or VOLAG, which is a private contractor with the State Department and the Department of Health and Human Services from the federal government to aid in that relocation within the first 6 months that they’re here. That meeting, interestingly enough, had about 35 stakeholders, people that have some part, some incentive, some exposure to the program. There was not a single elected official there from the City of St. Cloud or the county. There were no representatives of the School District and these are the places where we’re seeing the most impact, and, of course, the schools.

The federal contracts that the VOLAGs have, though they’re hardly volunteers, requires that they quarterly have meetings with stakeholders. Those stakeholders are supposed to include members of the community. I would take that a member of the community to be an elected representative and I have not been to a meeting where I’ve seen a city councilman, a county commissioner or anyone of an elected status.

Nowhere in Enos’ presentation did he mention Sharia law. Zach Dorholt said this in continuing the DFL’s façade:

“When people come to St. Cloud with the intent to divide us and spread hate and anger we here in St. Cloud are simply going to ask for peace, love and happiness,” Zach Dorholt said. “St. Cloud is always going to stand for peace, love and understanding over the fear and hate that those who don’t live here are trying to incite.”

In other words, Dorholt thinks that worrying about city and county finances is “spreading hate and anger.” Enos has talked about doing a moratorium on the refugee resettlement program until an audit is done to determine the local impact of the program.

If that’s Dorholt’s definition of racism, then it isn’t surprising that he sees racism everywhere. Speaking about things that aren’t surprising, it isn’t surprising that the Times got the lede information wrong.

I’m jumping for joy over Ryan Winkler’s impending resignation from the House of Representatives:

Fifth-term Rep. Ryan Winkler of Golden Valley said he will resign this summer and move to Brussels. The Harvard-educated lawyer said his wife, Jenny, landed a new executive position with an international hotel chain that is owned by a Minnesota company.

I’d like to personally thank Rep. Winkler’s wife for removing that particular pain from my backside. I’m more than grateful.

In the Legislature, Winkler revels in jabbing Republicans with unrelenting, sharp-tongued rhetoric.

“I’m going to miss things like passing the minimum wage increase far more than I’m going to miss the back and forth in the Legislature,” Winkler told The Associated Press, adding that his wife’s opportunity was too big to pass up. “I’d rather have a great experience with my family than argue with Republicans all day.”

That’s understandable. In the legislature and committee, he frequently got his ass handed to him in debates. While Rep. Winkler was irreverent, he wasn’t particularly smart. The difference showed up in June, 2013:

His penchant for a good zinger sometimes got the best of him. Winkler apologized in 2013, for a tweet criticizing U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas as “Uncle Thomas” that drew national attention and cries of racism. He said it wasn’t intended to be racially derogatory.

I wrote this post to highlight Rep. Winkler’s disgusting action. Here’s what he initially tweeted:

Here’s Rep. Winkler’s ‘apology’:

“I did not understand ‘Uncle Tom’ as a racist term, and there seems to be some debate about it. I do apologize for it, however,” he said.

Here’s what I said then:

That’s BS. Rep. Winkler graduated with a B.A. in history from Harvard University in 1998. If Rep. Winkler thinks that we’ll buy the fact that he didn’t learn about Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Harriet Beecher Stowe’s classic from 1852, he’d better think again.

Good riddance. Minnesota is getting rid of a first class jerk.

Greg Gutfeld’s monologue at the start of a segment of the Five raised some interesting questions that you’ll never hear on CNN or MSNBC. Check it out:

Here’s the heart of Gutfeld’s diatribe:

Those empty stands were an empty stand for those who champion appeasement energizes those who pretend to champion the underclass when, in fact, they seek destruction. This isn’t about race but radicals. Forget facts. They want friction. Radical idiocy abounds. You can’t call a thug a thug but you can call the police an occupying force. This leads to imitators in New York blocking tunnels and traffic. Who does this hurt really? The man? Please. You’re only hurting people trying to get home from work. But activists don’t care. They’re in this for themselves. Sure, a CVS burns but if you get your pills at a Brooklyn store, who really cares? They claim the protest was in solidarity but with whom? The people whose buildings burned but lost a senior center? A stadium’s vendors who lost business? The solidarity was with other campus cretins who treat black suffering as a night time hobby, shouting at cops is their aerobic tantrum, recorded for their ego-stroking playback in their comfy, well-lit dorm, fanning the destruction just to say they were there. These are the casual collaborators of minority pain. They don’t suffer the outcome. Their buildings don’t burn but they get a neat story to tell their friends back home.

For the most part, the Baltimore riots weren’t started by outraged citizens of Baltimore. They were orchestrated by anarchists sitting in other cities. It isn’t coincidence that the night after the Maryland National Guard helped maintain the peace in Baltimore that protests erupted in New York City, Los Angeles and Minneapolis.

The anarchists simply shifted to cities where they’d likely meet less resistance from law enforcement.

This isn’t about ending racism. The city of Baltimore has a large minority population. Their police force is mostly made of minorities. This is about opportunism. When Freddie Gray died, the anarchists knew that tensions in Baltimore would increase. Throw in a clueless mayor that thinks letting rioters riot with impunity is the best way to disperse the crowd. In the mind of the anarchists, that’s the perfect opportunity to encourage anarchy.

The destruction of property and the rioting were the predictable outcomes.

While he didn’t call out President Obama and Al Sharpton by name, he still let both Democrats have it in this interview:

Here’s a partial transcript of what Giuliani said:

FORMER NEW YORK MAYOR RUDY GIULIANI: We’ve had four months of propaganda starting with the president, that everybody should hate the police, I don’t care how you want to describe it, and that is what those protests are all about. The protests are being embraced. The protests are being encouraged. The protests — even the ones that don’t lead to violence — and a lot of them lead to violence, all lead to a conclusion: the police are bad, the police are racist. Actually, the people who do the most for the black community in America are the police. New York City and elsewhere. They are the ones, not Al Sharpton, who are putting their lives on the line to save black children.

President Obama, Mayor de Blasio and Al Sharpton haven’t shown any leadership. They’ve thrown white gas on a difficult situation. As a result of their political pandering and spinelessness, 2 NYPD police officers were assassinated this weekend.

Thank God for Rudy Giuliani’s post-mayoral leadership. Rudy’s never been afraid to speak out against injustice. He’s never hesitated to do what’s right in terms of public safety. In fact, I’d love seeing de Blasio recalled and Rudy elected to fix de Blasio’s disaster.

Al Sharpton is trying his best to distance himself from the protests he incited:

Similarly, the Rev. Al Sharpton, who has called for peaceful protests, condemned “eye-for-an-eye” violence and called it absurd to blame protesters or politicians for the officers’ deaths.

“We are now under intense threat from those who are misguided — from those who are trying to blame everyone from civil rights leaders to the mayor rather than deal with an ugly spirit that all of us need to fight,” he said. Sharpton added: “There are those of us committed to nonviolence and making the system work. And there are those committed to anarchy and recklessness who could care less about the families of police or the families who have raised questions about police accountability.”

That’s an outright lie. Al Sharpton led a protest where protesters cut loose with this chant:

What do we want? Dead cops. When do we want them? Now.

It’s disgustingly dishonest that Sharpton would insist that he’s “committed to nonviolence and making the system work”, especially after participating in a protest that called for the assassination of police officers. Participating in a protest where killing police officers is encouraged isn’t the first step in showing your commitment to peaceful protests.

It’s how you incite the violence that got 2 NYPD police officers shot.

It’s time to usher Bill de Blasio and Al Sharpton off the political stage. They incite their followers, then pretend that they’re committed to nonviolence.

Here’s more on the subject:

Sharpton, De Blasio scrambling
Obama, MSNBC silent while NYC burns
Al Sharpton, racist provocateur

I first heard of Ben Watson when he was drafted by the New England Patriots with the last pick in the first round of the 2004 NFL draft. Thanks to this interview with FNC’s Megyn Kelly, I’m seeing him in a different, more positive light than ever before:

Here’s the text of Ben Watson’s Facebook post:

At some point while I was playing or preparing to play Monday Night Football, the news broke about the Ferguson Decision. After trying to figure out how I felt, I decided to write it down. Here are my thoughts:

I’M ANGRY because the stories of injustice that have been passed down for generations seem to be continuing before our very eyes.

I’M FRUSTRATED, because pop culture, music and movies glorify these types of police citizen altercations and promote an invincible attitude that continues to get young men killed in real life, away from safety movie sets and music studios.

I’M FEARFUL because in the back of my mind I know that although I’m a law abiding citizen I could still be looked upon as a “threat” to those who don’t know me. So I will continue to have to go the extra mile to earn the benefit of the doubt.

I’M EMBARRASSED because the looting, violent protests, and law breaking only confirm, and in the minds of many, validate, the stereotypes and thus the inferior treatment.

I’M SAD, because another young life was lost from his family, the racial divide has widened, a community is in shambles, accusations, insensitivity hurt and hatred are boiling over, and we may never know the truth about what happened that day.

I’M SYMPATHETIC, because I wasn’t there so I don’t know exactly what happened. Maybe Darren Wilson acted within his rights and duty as an officer of the law and killed Michael Brown in self defense like any of us would in the circumstance. Now he has to fear the backlash against himself and his loved ones when he was only doing his job. What a horrible thing to endure. OR maybe he provoked Michael and ignited the series of events that led to him eventually murdering the young man to prove a point.

I’M OFFENDED, because of the insulting comments I’ve seen that are not only insensitive but dismissive to the painful experiences of others.

I’M CONFUSED, because I don’t know why it’s so hard to obey a policeman. You will not win!!! And I don’t know why some policeman abuse their power. Power is a responsibility, not a weapon to brandish and lord over the populace.

I’M INTROSPECTIVE, because sometimes I want to take “our” side without looking at the facts in situations like these. Sometimes I feel like it’s us against them. Sometimes I’m just as prejudiced as people I point fingers at. And that’s not right. How can I look at white skin and make assumptions but not want assumptions made about me? That’s not right.

I’M HOPELESS, because I’ve lived long enough to expect things like this to continue to happen. I’m not surprised and at some point my little children are going to inherit the weight of being a minority and all that it entails.

I’M HOPEFUL, because I know that while we still have race issues in America, we enjoy a much different normal than those of our parents and grandparents. I see it in my personal relationships with teammates, friends and mentors. And it’s a beautiful thing.

I’M ENCOURAGED, because ultimately the problem is not a SKIN problem, it is a SIN problem. SIN is the reason we rebel against authority. SIN is the reason we abuse our authority. SIN is the reason we are racist, prejudiced and lie to cover for our own. SIN is the reason we riot, loot and burn. BUT I’M ENCOURAGED because God has provided a solution for sin through the his son Jesus and with it, a transformed heart and mind. One that’s capable of looking past the outward and seeing what’s truly important in every human being. The cure for the Michael Brown, Trayvon Martin, Tamir Rice and Eric Garner tragedies is not education or exposure. It’s the Gospel. So, finally, I’M ENCOURAGED because the Gospel gives mankind hope.

That’s the message of a true 21st Century civil rights leader. Thank you, Mr. Watson, for speaking honestly about your thoughts. Most importantly, thank you for working overtime to be an inspiration to your family and your community.