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This AP article lists early the type of messaging we’ll hear from Gov. Dayton and the DFL:

For Democrats, back-to-school week brings a chance to brag about the launch of statewide all-day kindergarten where parents aren’t hit with fees or school districts don’t have to absorb costs of the extra classroom time. Over the next month, thousands of homeowners, renters and farmers will receive property tax refund checks from the state because of expanded eligibility and new money the Democratic-led Legislature and Gov. Mark Dayton designated for those programs.

That’s the glass-half-full version. Unfortunately, it omits some important details.

One of those details is how they paid for ‘free’ all-day kindergarten and the property tax refunds. Gov. Dayton and the DFL legislature paid for them by raising taxes on small business owners. Those entrepreneurs, in turn, paid for those taxes by laying people off, then hiring part-time employees who make half what the full-time employees made. That’s before factoring in the part-time employees’ loss of benefits.

The proof is already appearing. After the Dayton-DFL tax increases kicked in, job creation dropped dramatically. That drop wasn’t coincidental. Thus far this year, Minnesota’s economy created a pathetic 2,900 jobs. I’ll be perfectly clear. Minnesota’s economy isn’t creating 2,900 jobs each month. This year, it’s created 2,900 jobs.

In July, 4,200 jobs disappeared from Minnesota’s economy. Another 3,600 jobs were trimmed from June’s jobs report. That’s before talking about Minnesota’s revenues falling dramatically short of what’s needed to balance Minnesota’s budget. July’s revenues fell $69,000,000 short of what’s needed to balance the budget.

That means the Dayton-DFL deficit is speeding its way in our direction. It isn’t a matter of if we’ll have a deficit in 2015. It’s a matter of how big the Dayton-DFL deficit will be and how we’ll fix the Dayton-DFL disaster.

Hopefully, we’ll start by firing the incompetents who created this mess. That starts with terminating Gov. Dayton and demoting Speaker Thissen to Minority Leader Thissen. Next, it means spending less by spending money only on the things we need, not the things that the DFL’s special interest puppeteers push.

House Minority Leader Kurt Daudt, R-Crown, said the fact five of the past six monthly revenue reports have come in below the mark spells trouble. “They’ve taken a recovery and turned it into a flat-line at best,” Daudt said of Democrats. “It’s not me looking for a storm cloud. It’s an absolute fact and the realities of the policies they’ve put in place not working.”

Gov. Dayton and the DFL are bragging about the great Minnesota economy. Great economies, however, produce revenues that create surpluses, not deficits. The Dayton-DFL deficit is proof that Minnesota’s economy isn’t working.

Republicans aren’t happy with the state of Minnesota’s economy. They’re upset that the Dayton-DFL economy is failing hard-working Minnesotans. Republicans want to change directions so Minnesota’s economy can grow. That starts with getting PolyMet a reality. The jolt of revenues that will produce will balance Minnesota’s budget while lifting thousands of Minnesotans out of unemployment, poverty or both.

Gov. Dayton and the DFL have highlighted Minnesota’s relatively low unemployment rate. I explained in this post why the unemployment rate doesn’t prove the economy’s strength:

For the last 3+ years, the unemployment rate has been next-to-worthless as a benchmark of economic vitality. That’s because millions of people (literally) nationwide have quit looking for work, thereby artificially lowering the nation’s unemployment rate.

Another reason why the unemployment rate has become unreliable in terms of how strong the economy is is the number of people who’ve had their hours cut thanks to Obamacare. These are known as 29ers.

A person who is working a part-time low-paying job looks the same on the monthly jobs report as the employee who worked a high-paying full-time job a year ago. And there are lots of people working 2 part-time jobs who were making lots of money at their full-time jobs.

The Dayton-DFL deficit is speeding our direction. The Dayton-DFL jobs bust is already manifesting itself. Creating 2,900 jobs in 7 months is pathetic.

The question is whether voters will appreciate a handful of freebies more than they hate Minnesota’s struggling economy.

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David Strom’s op-ed highlights the fact that Minnesota’s economy isn’t as strong as Gov. Dayton and the Alliance for a Better Minnesota have said it is:

Just a few years ago, more than 75 percent of adults in Minnesota were in the workforce. Now that number is 70.1 percent—yet that 5 percentage-point difference isn’t actually counted in the unemployment number, because unemployment only measures people “in the workforce.”

That’s thousands of people who fall into the category of “discouraged worker;” you and I probably think of them as having given up looking for work.

Gov. Dayton’s quote about Minnesota’s economy is utterly dishonest:

“The economy is improving and growing rapidly.”

Either Gov. Dayton isn’t honest or his grip on reality isn’t that tight. An economy can’t be “growing rapidly” when tens of thousands of people have given up looking for work. Rapidly growing economies are characterized by people jumping into the workforce:

Workforce participation peaked in the Clinton years, and slowly drifted down post 9/11. Finally, in 2006 it started rising again, as the economy recovered until the crash.

Since then, it has plummeted, and is still declining.

When an economy is really booming, the workforce expands because opportunity is out there. We simply aren’t seeing that, and people aren’t feeling it either.

There’s no doubt that Gov. Dayton and ABM will continue their mantra that Minnesota’s economy is getting stronger each day Gov. Dayton is in office. That it isn’t growing rapidly isn’t their concern because they aren’t worried about telling the truth. They’re only worried about getting Gov. Dayton re-elected.

There are other warning signs we should be paying attention to: tax revenues have come in under projections in 5 of the past 6 months, signaling that the economy isn’t doing as well as economists predicted. Much of that shortfall is due to poor income tax collections, indicating that people aren’t making as much money.

There’s little doubt that we’re heading for a significant deficit. The only question is how we’ll choose to fix it. Gov. Dayton raised taxes on “the rich” in 2013, which means he can’t raise their taxes again without cratering Minnesota’s economy. The DFL won’t cut spending, either, which means Gov. Dayton and the DFL will deplete the state’s Rainy Day Fund. Once they’ve depleted the Rainy Day Fund, which seems inevitable, then it’ll be a matter of whether Gov. Dayton and the DFL will raise taxes on the middle class.

Mark Dayton risks looking out of touch if he touts the Minnesota economy too much. Hardly anyone thinks things are “booming” right now, unless you count the people striking out for the Bakken oil fields. Most of us, in fact, feel like we are just hanging on, thankful for the job we have, and worried that it might not be there this time next year.

The other people that think Minnesota’s economy is booming are the 21,523 people who’ve been hired by the government. If you’re looking for work in the government, then St. Paul or DC is the place to be. If you want private sector work, however, Minnesota isn’t that great.

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Brian Bakst’s AP article contains this quote, which proves Gov. Dayton will lie if that’s what he thinks he needs to get elected:

Dayton sees it as “an indication of how desperate the Republicans are to find something to complain about because they know the economy is improving and growing rapidly.”

Gov. Dayton’s statement is, at minimum, fiction. At most, it’s an outright lie. If Minnesota’s economy is “growing rapidly”, as Gov. Dayton insists, why haven’t revenues met projections 5 of the last 6 months? If Minnesota’s economy is “growing rapidly,” why did revenues fall 6.6% short of projections last month?

There’s little doubt in my mind that Gov. Dayton will continue repeating that fiction the rest of the campaign. He isn’t worried that the media will question his statement. Brian Bakst certainly didn’t question Gov. Dayton’s statement. I haven’t seen other reporters question the Alliance for a Better Minnesota’s latest video that insists that Minnesota is working, either.

Let’s be blunt about this. Gov. Dayton hasn’t hesitated in insisting that Minnesota’s economy is doing well. ABM hasn’t hesitated in insisting that life under Gov. Dayton is a return to the DFL’s glory days. The Twin Cities media hasn’t questioned the voracity of Gov. Dayton’s statements or ABM’s lies.

ABM won’t say anything about the fact that DEED just announced the fact that Minnesota’s economy just lost 7,800 in the last jobs report. DEED reported that Minnesota’s economy shrunk by 4,200 jobs in July and that they’d overestimated the number of jobs created in June by 3,600.

Gov. Dayton certainly won’t talk about the verifie fact that Minnesota’s economy has create a pathetic 2,900 jobs thus far this year. Why would he when he knows that ABM will lie for him and the Twin Cities media won’t question him?

If Republicans don’t start questioning the media, Gov. Dayton and ABM, they’ll lose this highly winnable election. When I say Republicans, that’s everyone from Keith Downey to Jeff Johnson and Bill Quisle to legislative candidates like Dale Lueck and Jim Knoblach to the activists working to win over voters, then getting them to vote for Republicans.

“The Republicans are right in saying the economy still looks dismal relative to reasonable expectations,” Chari said. “The Democrats are also right in saying there’s only a limited amount in what a governor of a relatively small state can do when faced with headwinds this strong.”

Actually, this graphic says that a governor’s policies can have a rather dramatic impact on the economy:

That graphic is proof that job creation tanked after the Dayton-DFL tax increase went into effect. That graphic verifies as fact that Minnesota’s economy has created few jobs this year. While jobs were created by the hundreds when Republicans had the majority in the House and Senate, jobs are being create by the dozens since the Dayton-DFL tax increases took effect. In fact, Minnesota had negative job growth last month.

It isn’t surprising that Gov. Dayton and the Alliance for a Better Minnesota is telling whoppers about the state of the state’s economy. It’s up to Jeff Johnson and the Republican Party of Minnesota to swat down Gov. Dayton’s and ABM’s myths.

The statistics are there. All we have to do is tell the truth.

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This summer, Gov. Dayton, the DFL and ABM (pardon the repetition) have talked up Minnesota’s economy well beyond reality. As part of their schtick, they’ve talked about how they’ve solved Minnesota’s deficits. They’ve done nothing of the sort.

Gov. Dayton’s and the DFL legislature’s appetite for spending is never satisfied. The gap between more and enough never closes. Whatever they’ve spent isn’t quite enough.

Last month’s revenues came in significantly short of the projection. It came in $69,000,000 short of the projection. That represents a 6.6% shortfall. Further, revenues have fallen short of projections 5 of the last 6 months, with July’s shortfall being the biggest shortfall thus far.

While this doesn’t prove that Minnesota is headed for a recession, it means that we’re likely heading for another significant deficit. With the likelihood of another deficit increasing with each revenue shortfall, the question then becomes how Gov. Dayton and the DFL would fix the deficit.

History often serves as a guide. In February, 2007, Minnesota had a $2,200,000,000 surplus. The Rainy Day Fund was full. The DFL legislature spent every penny of the surplus. When the economy slowed, the DFL spent down the Rainy Day Fund.

With revenues falling short of projection and with Minnesota’s economy shedding 4,200 jobs in July (plus revising June’s job numbers down by 3,600), there’s no question a significant deficit is on its way. The only questions left are a) how big will the deficit be and b) how soon will Gov. Dayton and the DFL admit that their budget didn’t fix the deficit.

This has ramifications beyond Minnesota’s economy, too. Gov. Dayton and the DFL have an incentive for not admitting that their policies have failed. If these economic figures got out during a gubernatorial debate at the Great Minnesota Get Together, Gov. Dayton and the DFL would be put on the defensive by Minnesotans.

I hope that Jeff Johnson highlights these economic statistics in his stump speech. If he starts highlighting the fact that Gov. Dayton’s tax increases have led to shrinking revenues and job cuts, he’ll paint Gov. Dayton and the DFL legislature into a corner.

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Yesterday, I wrote this article to highlight ABM’s willingness to publish things that it knows aren’t true. Bill Glahn picked up on that article and wrote this post, which he appropriately titled “Minnesota isn’t working.” Frankly, Bill does a better job of illustrating how terrible the Dayton-DFL economy is. This graphic shows the difference between job growth when the GOP had the majority in the House and Senate and the job growth when Gov. Dayton and the DFL controlled all of state government:

Honest people can’t disagree that significantly more jobs were created while Republicans held majorities in the House and Senate than have been created during all DFL control in St. Paul. At this point, the Republicans’ point is made. Their policies led to greater job creation than during the days of all-DFL control. But Bill didn’t stop there. He published this graphic to highlight Minnesota’s job creation numbers pre-tax increase vs. post-tax increase:

Gov. Dayton, the DFL and ABM will undoubtedly attempt to explain away the dropoff in jobs created after the tax increase went into effect as coincidence. That’s BS. It isn’t coincidence. It’s the direct, predictable, result of the Dayton-DFL tax increases.

The thing is that the totals aren’t close. Over 70,000 jobs were created before the Dayton-DFL tax increase compared with a little over 30,000 jobs being created after the Dayton-DFL tax increase.

I highlighted in my article that a pathetic 300 jobs were created in January-March, 2014. Another 2,600 jobs were created in April-July, 2014. The April-July numbers are hurt by the fact that 4,200 jobs were cut in Minnesota during July.

The reason I started looking into Minnesota’s job creation numbers is because of ABM’s dishonest video (that’s the only kind they put together) about the Dayton-DFL stewardship of the economy:

Here’s the transcript of the video:

Look across the land. On farms and in factories, in classrooms and on construction sites, Minnesota is working. For years ago, Minnesota faced a $5,000,000,000 deficit. But Gov. Mark Dayton showed strong leadership. He raised taxes on the wealthiest 2 percent so we could invest in our schools and reduce middle class taxes. Now Minnesota has 150,000 new jobs and a budget surplus.

That’s insulting to honest Minnesotans. Minnesota’s economy hasn’t created 150,000 jobs during Gov. Dayton’s time in office. It’s more like 96,000 jobs created, with the vast majority of them getting created while Republican policies were in effect. The Dayton-DFL tax increases have essentially killed Minnesota’s job growth.

There’s no question that the Dayton-DFL tax increases have led Minnesota companies to leave the state. It’s time Minnesotans told the Dayton-DFL-ABM Axis of Lies that we insist that their ads be honest or, at minimum, not this blatantly dishonest.

How can we trust Gov. Dayton and the DFL to govern when they won’t tell us the truth about what’s already happened? It’s the worst of all worlds. Gov. Dayton’s and the DFL’s policiess have failed, which is why they’re lying to cover up their failure now.

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Late Monday afternoon, the Johnson for Governor campaign issued this statement:

GOLDEN VALLEY—Jeff Johnson received the endorsement of the Minnesota Farm Bureau today, adding to his credentials as a candidate for all of Minnesota.

“I am proud to be endorsed by the Farm Bureau,” said Johnson, who was born and raised in Detroit Lakes and now lives in Plymouth.

“I picked Bill Kuisle, a farmer from the Rochester area and former state representative, as my running mate because he has been a steadfast advocate for Greater Minnesota his whole life. Minnesota needs a governor that appreciates and represents the entire state, and that’s exactly the kind of governor I’ll be when I take office next January.”

The Johnson campaign noted that earlier this year, Dayton replaced his lieutenant governor from Greater Minnesota with his chief of staff from Minneapolis as his running mate for re-election. And in 2013, Dayton singled Minnesota farmers out for a special tax on their equipment repair.

Gov. Dayton doesn’t have a great record on agriculture. As noted in the Johnson campaign’s statement, Gov. Dayton went to FarmFest last year and announced that he’d just discovered that the tax bill he’d negotiated and signed included a sales tax on farm equipment repairs. Shortly thereafter, Gov. Dayton promised he’d call on the legislature to repeal the farm equipment repair sales tax increase during a special session to pass flood relief.

By the time the State Fair opened, Gov. Dayton had broken that promise.

Gov. Dayton and his running mate, Tina Smith, are both city slickers who wouldn’t know the first thing about running a farm. By comparison, Bill Quisle, Jeff Johnson’s running mate, is a farmer in southern Minnesota and a former state legislator.

It isn’t that Quisle can relate to farmers. It’s that he’s one of them. He knows farm issues like no other running mate in recent history.

This campaign sets up a classic confrontation. The Dayton-Smith ticket should do well in the Twin Cities, Duluth and possibly Rochester. The Johnson-Quisle ticket will do well in the suburbs, the exurbs and rural Minnesota. If I was forced to predict, I’d bet that the Johnson-Quisle ticket will do great in the 2nd, 3rd, 6th and 7th districts while holding its own in Minnesota’s First District and the western and southern portions of the Eighth District.

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It’s amazing that Charlie Weaver has any Republican friends left. I wouldn’t show my face for a month if I’d said this BS about the Dayton/DFL economy:

“The economy is pretty strong,” said Charlie Weaver, a veteran of state Republican politics and executive director of the Minnesota Business Partnership, which represents the state’s largest corporations. “We have a low unemployment rate — one of the lowest in the country,” he said.

A former top aide under Gov. Tim Pawlenty, Weaver predicted that Republican candidates, particularly Dayton’s challenger, will be forced to find other issues as contrasts with Democrats.

Far too often, this is what happens when a Republican gives up his principles to become a lobbyist. What happened here is Charlie Weaver, lobbyist, said something Charlie Weaver, conservative, wouldn’t get caught dead saying.

Weaver’s statement is a combination of fiction and professional self-preservation. It’s impossible for an honest person to look at the July jobs report and conclude the economy is strong. July’s jobs report just confirmed the fact that Minnesota’s economy sucks:

Minnesota lost 4,200 jobs in July, disappointing news in a year so far of tepid job growth for the state. The unemployment rate remained at 4.5 percent, according to figures released Thursday by the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development. The U.S. unemployment rate in July was 6.2 percent.

June’s job gains were also revised downward by 3,600, driving home the point that over the first seven months of the year Minnesota’s job market has been stuck in neutral. After adding 41,900 positions from August to December 2013, the state has added only 2,900 jobs since January. Some 133,000 Minnesotans are officially unemployed, and thousands more are working part-time jobs when they would rather work full time.

Isn’t Mr. Weaver troubled by the fact that one-third of the jobs created in the past year are government jobs? If he isn’t, why isn’t he? Certainly, Mr. Weaver is smart enough to know that government confiscates people’s money. Certainly, he knows that government doesn’t create wealth.

Over the last 6 months, revenues have fallen significantly short of projections. In July, it fell short of projections by 6.6%. This constitutes a trend. That isn’t a one-time blip.

What’s particularly disgusting is that Charlie Weaver is hurting Jeff Johnson’s campaign whenever he lies about the strength of the Dayton/DFL economy. Months of terrible jobs reports, combined with revenues consistently falling short of projections, aren’t the statistics that you get from a booming economy. Yes, 2,900 jobs created in 7 months is pathetic. By comparison, St. Cloud created 2,894 jobs in 12 months.

Over the past 12 months, 68,344 jobs were created in Minnesota. A total of 46,339 jobs were created in Minneapolis-St. Paul, followed by St. Cloud with 2,894, Mankato with 1,236, Duluth-Superior with 1,145 jobs followed by Rochester with 1,054 jobs. That’s a total of 52,668 jobs created in those cities.

Noticeably missing from the list are Moorhead, Brainerd, Monticello, Hutchinson, Willmar and any Iron Range cities. Mr. Weaver, isn’t it important to creat jobs in those cities, too? Apparently, Gov. Dayton doesn’t think so. Apparently, Gov. Dayton and Mr. Weaver think it isn’t important to create jobs in northern Minnesota cities not named Duluth.

I’m pretty certain that people in Forest Lake, Grand Rapids, Alexandria, Pierz and Little Falls think it’s important to create jobs in their towns. I’m pretty certain that they’d love seeing new businesses starting up in their cities.

Here’s the dirty little secret Charlie Weaver doesn’t want anyone to know. He isn’t looking out for Main Street Minnesota. He’s looking out for big corporations. This isn’t a criticism of big corporations. I appreciate any company that employs lots of people. It’s merely highlighting the fact that big corporations have the resources to comply with Gov. Dayton’s and the DFL’s regulations and tax code.

Small businesses, the kind found throughout the 6th, 7th and 8th districts, find it difficult to create wealth and expand their companies. If you only care about the Twin Cities, which Mr. Weaver apparently does, then Minnesota’s economy might look ok.

If you care about statewide prosperity, though, which Jeff Johnson does, then Minnesota’s economy isn’t doing well.

If Mr. Weaver wants to peddle Gov. Dayton’s BS that Minnesota’s economy is “pretty strong”, then he’d better expect me to highlight the truth about Minnesota’s job creation statistics. He’d better be prepared to be called out for his BS.

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This video should worry Democrats:

The Democrats think they’ve caught Sen. Torrey Westrom in a ‘Mitt Romney moment’. In reality, they’ve shown 7th District voters that their activists aren’t the brightest people around. Here’s what I’m talking about:

Man: [During] the Eisenhower Administration, we built our infrastructure, our roads, our bridges, our schools, our fire halls, we built that during that era and the tax rate on the wealthiest people was 60 percent, and it was an honor for them, and society looked up to them, they were pillars in their community and respected, and we appreciated them. And now all I see is scapegoating on the poor, blaming people on food assistance when they can’t even get a part-time job… I’m saying that [rich people] pay less in income tax than poor people do.

Westrom: Even though 48 percent of Americans don’t pay taxes?

The first indication that this activist isn’t the brightest bulb in the chandelier is his implication that high income taxes in the 1950s paid for the interstate highway system. Income taxes didn’t have a thing to do with building and maintaining the interstate highway system:

About 70 percent of the construction and maintenance costs of Interstate Highways in the United States have been paid through user fees, primarily the fuel taxes collected by the federal, state, and local governments. To a much lesser extent they have been paid for by tolls collected on toll highways and bridges. The Highway Trust Fund, established by the Highway Revenue Act in 1956, prescribed a three-cent-per-gallon fuel tax, soon increased to 4.5 cents per gallon. In 1993 the tax was increased to 18.4 cents per gallon, where it remains as of 2012.

The next indicator that this activist isn’t the brightest bulb in the chandelier is that he thinks “poor people” pay more income taxes than “the rich.” Sen. Westrom dispatched that argument by telling the activist that “48 percent of Americans” don’t pay income taxes.

This wasn’t a vilification of “poor people.” It was simply a statement of statistical fact. It’s interesting that the DFL activist thinks stating a statistical fact is an act of vilification. Sen. Westrom finally had enough of the activist’s rantings:

Man: The Bible says, ‘To whom much has been given, much shall be required.’ Now [the wealthy] built that infrastructure and they did that out of the goodness of their hearts in the ’50s and now it’s like pulling teeth to get an extra dime out of the wealthiest people in this society, and I’m tired of it.

Westrom: Let me tell you, versus your philosophy, my philosophy is, don’t overtax the citizens, let them keep their hard-earned wealth [and] take care of themselves as much as they can and we do for the communities that individually they can’t do for themselves. You would rather tax everybody’s income, take it away from them, redistribute it, government knows best…

Before getting into Sen. Westrom’s reply, let’s focus on the activist’s statement that “the wealthy built that infrastructure…out of the goodness of their hearts…” That’s the picture of delusion. The truth is that “the wealthy” built much of this nation’s infrastructure to create bigger profits for their companies.

As for Sen. Westrom’s statement, he’s right in his philosophy of letting the people keep their money. The thought that the federal government knows best is intellectually laughable. For instance, Minnesota had a great health insurance system that featured one of the lowest rates of uninsured in the nation. In 2011, 93% of Minnesotans were insured. In 2013, thanks directly to the Affordable Care Act, that rate of insured ‘jumped’ to 95%. It just cost Minnesotans the paltry amount of $160,000,000 and counting.

The MNsure website still isn’t working. In fact, it won’t be working correctly until after this fall’s open enrollment. Thank God for the federal government’s intervention. I don’t know what we would’ve done without their assistance, though I’d love to find out.

This video should dispel the notion of government being benevolent:

Simply put, Sen. Westrom is right in ridiculing this activist. In fact, it’s best for him to just put this behind him so he can highlight his positive agenda and Collin Peterson’s history of Nancy Pelosi pushing him around. (Think voting for Cap and Trade after promising his constituents he wouldn’t vote for it.)

Sen. Westrom won’t take the 7th District for granted like Collin Peterson has for the last 20 years. Sen. Westrom has a history of getting things done. That’s the type of congressman Minnesota’s 7th District needs.

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Katie Clark-Sieben insists that Minnesota’s jobs outlook remains strong despite the fact that Minnesota lost 4,200 jobs in July:

DEED Commissioner Katie Clark Sieben said despite the July job loss the state’s economic outlook is healthy. “July’s employment change appears disappointing, however, this is the smallest percentage decline in jobs for a July since 1999,” Sieben said. “Minnesota’s economic indicators remain positive, and underlying employment data continue to look strong.”

Sieben is a politician, not a serious economic analyst. Her statement is campaign fodder. It isn’t economic analysis. If job growth is as strong as Ms. Sieben insists, money should be flowing into state coffers in large amounts. That isn’t what MMB is reporting:

Net general fund revenues totaled $982 million in the first month of FY 2015, $69 million(6.6 percent) less than forecast.

Being off by 6.6% in a month isn’t good news. In fact, it’s rather disheartening. Couple that information with this information and a person could get downright pessimistic:

The state has gained 68,344 jobs since July 2013, led by 21,513 new government positions.

Let’s remember that 2,900 of those 68,344 have been created this year, meaning that 65,444 jobs were created in August-December 2013. Creating 65,444 jobs in 5 months is quite a bit more than 2,900 jobs created in 7 months. It doesn’t take a math major to figure it out that job growth is essentially stalling in 2014.

Here’s what we know:

  1. Government is the biggest growth industry in job creation, creating one-third of the jobs in the last year.
  2. Revenues have fallen short 5 of the last 6 months.
  3. Job growth has virtually stagnated this year, with much of the job growth coming from the hospitality industry and temp jobs.

Those aren’t the signs of a strong economy. They’re the signs of an economy that’s badly underperforming.

Gov. Dayton’s and the DFL’s policies aren’t working. It’d be one thing if this was a one-month blip. Creating 400 jobs a month for 7 months isn’t a blip. Revenues falling short of projections 5 of the last 6 months isn’t a one-month blip. It’s a disturbing, negative trend.

There’s little question that Gov. Dayton and the DFL will continue telling Minnesota that things are just fine. They don’t have a choice in that matter. It’s either that or admit that Gov. Dayton’s and the DFL’s policies are failing. That won’t happen.

Gov. Dayton’s and the DFL’s policies are failing. The alternative is to replace Gov. Dayton with Jeff Johnson and Speaker Thissen with Speaker Daudt. Speaking of Jeff Johnson, he issued this pithy statement:

“According to the Department of Employment and Economic Development half of Minnesotans are underemployed. That means people have part time jobs, low paying jobs, and aren’t climbing the economic ladder,” said Jeff Johnson.

“Minnesotans shouldn’t be satisfied to be ‘hanging on’ to a job they don’t want. People want careers, not minimum wage jobs. Minnesota’s economy is sputtering, and now people aren’t even able keep the jobs they have,” said Johnson.

“Anemic job growth is unacceptable. Job losses are worse. Dayton is satisfied with just hanging on; I am not,” concluded Johnson.

Settling for anemic job growth isn’t acceptable, especially when we’ve just gotten hit with a big tax increase. Nonexistent job growth and higher taxes isn’t the right economic model.

It’s time to change.

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This LTE is just another helping of DFL gibberish:

Joe Perske, who is a candidate for the 6th Congressional District, is the kind of person we need to represent us in Washington.

Joe has worked in local politics for the past 10 years and has advocated diligently for workers and families in this area. He has an incredible gift of being able to relate to people from all walks of life. He has the integrity we are lacking in Washington today.

Recently he was endorsed by the Minnesota AFL-CIO Committee on Political Education for his positions and record on issues of importance to workers and their families. The endorsement is based on his steadfast support of working families.

The notion that a DFL congressional candidate getting endorsed by the AFL-CIO isn’t news. Based on their list of endorsees, if you had a D behind your name, you were endorsed.

Simply put, Perske is just another tax-raising liberal. His history is littered with raising propert taxes and spending money foolishly.

In 2010, I wrote that Tarryl faced an uphill climb against Michele Bachmann. Tarryl lost by 13 points, the biggest winning margin in Michele’s congressional career. If Republicans work hard this year, the DFL will look at the Michele vs. Tarryl as the good old days.

Tom Emmer is a great fit for the district. He’s fiscally conservative, which is important. Most importantly, he’s a reform-minded conservative.

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