Archive for the ‘COVID-19’ Category

Scott Jensen and John Marty aren’t on the same page when it comes to COVID-19. This is where the 2 senators are at:

“We’re not going to get through this by having someone serve as an emperor of Minnesota,” said state Sen. Scott Jensen, R-Chaska. “I’ve heard dictator. I’ve heard tyrant. I’ve heard emperor,” countered state Sen. John Marty, DFL-Roseville. “I know Tim Walz and I don’t think he’s any of those things.”

I don’t know Tim Walz but I can analyze the things I’m seeing. According to Scott Johnson’s meticulous reporting, we’ve had 25 COVID-related deaths in the past week: 5, 5, 4, 3 & 8. That’s a health concern. It isn’t a health crisis by any stretch of the imagination.

While it’s subjective, let’s introduce Dr. Scott Jensen’s COVID report card:


Let’s go through Sen. Jensen’s report card:

Physical distancing, common sense and surges and peaks: “We’ve done pretty well.”
States rights in terms of being honored by the federal government, “doing pretty well.”
In terms of the federal government getting dollars to the states to make things work, so we can support the initiatives for COVID-19, “doing ok.”
Suspending air travel and securing borders: “We’re doing ok.”
“CDC botched up testing pretty good and they didn’t tell us and when it did get disclosed … they wasted more time.”
“Civil liberty encroachments?” “When Gov. Walz decides to send out addresses of every COVID-19 cases to 500 law enforcement agencies, it doesn’t really sound like we’re really protecting people’s private health information.”

Dr. Jensen then said that he wasn’t “holding Gov. Walz accountable for spreading misinformation or reckless advice … because he initially said we’d have 74,000 deaths”, then reduced it to 29,000. “Oh yeah, today is July 13th. This was supposed to be peak day. This was when our intensive cares were supposed to be overrun and we were supposed to have over 1,000 deaths per day in Minnesota. But, gee, over 5 or 6 months, we’ve only had 1,500 total and 1,200 of those were in long-term care facilities, which actually had active COVID-19 patients shipped into them” so “we don’t get a very good grade on that.”

Final assessment: “Our report card isn’t so great but if you look at the best grades we got, it’s because we leaned into you. We leaned into the personal responsibility of Minnesotans and Americans. We asked you ‘Please physically distance. Please honor the people around you.”

“If I were the teacher grading it, I’d give the politicians a D. I’d give Minnesotans and Americans a B or an A-.”

That’s a fair report card but I’d take it a step further. Generally speaking, the DFL has stunk at trusting Minnesotans. My state representative, Dan Wolgamott, has voted to support Tim Walz on COVID-related issues 100% of the time. He’s trusted the government to make the big decisions. He didn’t trust small businesses and families to make the biggest decisions.

Businesses and families are the front-line troops on the ground. They know what’s happening in their lives. State government is there to provide support. It isn’t there to make all the decisions for us. Thus far, Tim Walz has been an autocrat. He’s treated Minnesotans like his subjects. Dan Wolgamott has supported Tim Walz, not Minnesota families.

Finally, I’d give him a D- or an F. I’d give the DFL the same grade.

If you don’t get anything else accomplished today, make sure you read this article. More than any other article today, this is the article that will provide the most evidence that the MSM isn’t honest. Clay Travis writes “On Sunday a major positive milestone was reached for the first time, coronavirus deaths declined by 90% in this country from the high set on April 21st. That’s an incredibly positive story about our national battle with the virus. Yet, shockingly, it has received almost no media attention.”

Travis continues, saying “That’s indefensible because this is not complicated data to track down. You can see it yourself on this chart here, on April 21st 2,693 people died of the coronavirus. Yesterday 267 died. Putting that number into perspective, an average of 7200 people died on Sunday of something other than the coronavirus and those deaths received almost no media attention at all.”

Here’s Travis’s tweet that ties things together:


The week prior to President Trump’s rally, Democrats insisted that holding the Tulsa rally would bring the United States back to the terrible old days when NYC had “132,467 cases, including 9,101 confirmed coronavirus deaths and 4,582 probable coronavirus deaths, NYC Health said.” That’s from an article dated April 20, 2020. Those statistics are cumulative.

Let’s stipulate that 1 death is too many, 267 is far too many but 9,101 (cumulative in NYC) is a catastrophe. Let’s further stipulate that shrinking the COVID deaths from 2,693 to 267 is a dramatic improvement. Democrats complain that various states, including Oklahoma where the rally was held, are experiencing spikes. A 20% increase in deaths would constitute a spike. That’s an increase from 267 to 320 nationwide. There were days in NYC when they topped that amount easily.

(For the coronabros out there, yes Sunday tends to be the lowest day of the week, but if you want to use the seven day moving average instead of Sunday, the data still reflects a 70+% decline in mortality, a similarly wildly positive story.)

This is why you don’t hear positive news:

Almost no mainstream media outlets in the country have made note of the collapsing coronavirus death total in this country. Why is that?

It’s certainly not because the media is attempting to share fair and balanced journalism with its audience, it’s because they’ve recognized fear porn drives engagement, even if it isn’t reflecting reality. Scaring people to death works. Emotion is the coin of the social media realm and logical analysis of facts is disfavored if it doesn’t elicit the same firestorm of social media pandemonium.

It’s time to put social media into the proper perspective. Most of it isn’t fit to publish in the National Enquirer. Then again, much of the trash that’s published in the Washington Post, CNN and the NYTimes isn’t fit for the Enquirer, either.

Take a deep breath. Find some authors that are reliably truthful, then trust them to inform you. If you do that, you’ll save lots of headaches. From what I’ve seen thus far, Outkick is trustworthy.

The DFL Speaker of the House keeps preventing the people from being heard. She’s assisted Gov. Walz in maintaining autocratic rule over the state of Minnesota. Now that there’s a special session underway and she wants to pass some DFL bills, she’s suddenly in favor of hearing from the people. Hortman doesn’t really want to hear from the people of Minnesota. She just wants to pass some leftist anti-police legislation that Gov. Walz wants passed.

At this point, Gov. Walz’s initiatives shouldn’t be taken seriously. Too often, his policies have failed Minnesotans. Letting COVID-infected patients back into long-term care facilities literally killed people. Gov. Walz’s Department of Health turned a blind eye toward programs that illegally shipped money to the DFL’s special interest allies while cheating taxpayers.

Senate Republicans are supposed to have a say in how the state is governed. Instead, Gov. Walz has insisted that he make all the decisions without advice from the legislature. That’s how banana republics in Africa operate. That isn’t how things work in the United States. If Walz wants something, he’ll need to do something he hasn’t done much of. He’ll need to a) relinquish his autocratic authority and b) do some good-faith negotiating.

If Gov. Walz insists on playing the part of a dictator, then Republicans should tell him that they don’t take orders from dictators. If Ms. Hortman insists that Republicans listen to the people, Republicans should tell her that listening to the people isn’t a situational thing. Legislators are the people’s voice. Walz doesn’t speak for each different city or community. That’s the legislators’ responsibility.

Gov. Walz shouldn’t turn the dials on which businesses open and which businesses get financially ruined. If we had a legitimate leader, Minnesota’s economy wouldn’t have tanked like it has. It’s time to turn the page on Tim Walz. He’s a failure. He mishandled the COVID pandemic, with hundreds of our most vulnerable dying needlessly. He utterly failed with the Floyd riots, with minority neighborhoods getting destroyed because of Walz’s and Frey’s inaction. Walz failed by letting vandals demolish a statue of Christopher Columbus while state troopers stood by.

After the statue was toppled, Walz said that he’s upset and that there will be consequences. I’ll believe it when I see it. Thus far, Walz has been a wimp. We don’t need people who promise consequences after-the-fact. We need proactive leaders who do the right thing the first time. That person isn’t Tim Walz. It’s time for him to be shoved off the stage.

As for Ms. Hortman, I suspect that she’s serving her only term as Speaker. She’s represented the Twin Cities only. She hasn’t represented the other parts of the state.

The Democrat Parties’ (plural possessive) problem heading into November is visible to people willing to see what’s actually there. What’s actually there are 2 political parties within the Democratic Party. There’s the far left wing of the Democrat Party, represented by Nancy Pelosi. Then there’s the even farther left wing of the Democrat Party. That wing is represented by Ilhan Omar, AOC and, to a lesser degree, Lisa Bender and Jeremiah Ellison.

The Pelosi wing of the Democrat Party are nuttier than a warehouse full of fruitcake. They just pretend that they’re moderates. They aren’t moderates except by comparison with the AOC wing. Two years ago, Democrats crowed about how Conor Lamb was their blueprint for a candidate. This year, Lamb will likely lose to Sean Parnell in western Pennsylvania.

Lamb’s problem is what I’ve called Tarryl Clark syndrome. For those of you outside Minnesota, Tarryl used to be my state senator until 2010. Then she was known as a moderate when she first ran. Then a terrible thing happened to Tarryl. She accumulated a voting record. Included in that record was a vote to literally vote for a tax increase. When she cast her vote, the vote was tied 33-33. Thereafter, she became Taxin’ Tarryl Clark. In 2010, Michele Bachmann beat Tarryl by 14 points, as I predicted. But I digress. Lamb has accumulated a rather leftist voting record, too. He voted for both articles of impeachment. He’s voted with Pelosi 90+ percent of the time.

The AOC wing of the Party wants to defund police departments. They also want to defund ICE, aka the Immigration and Customs Enforcement. This wing of the Democrat Party is vehemently opposed to law enforcement. This is what happens when you don’t worship at the altar of the AOC wing of the Democrat Party:

Brad Parscale, the Trump campaign’s manager, wrote this scathing op-ed that demolished the credibility of most media polls. In it, he wrote this:

To the delight of liberals everywhere, the Atlanta-based hub of fake news recently put out a poll showing Biden with a 14-point lead in the race, with 55% of the vote to Trump’s 41%, a larger share than any presidential candidate has received in an actual election since Ronald Reagan garnered 58.8% in his 1984 shellacking of Walter Mondale.

CNN’s latest wonder is a poll of all adult voters, with no effort made to sort out which people are likely, or even registered, to vote. This method of polling consistently undercounts Republican turnout, as more-reputable polling outfits have long understood, and as CNN should have learned from 2016.

Think of this as a repeat of the battle between the COVID models vs. the COVID data. The same principles apply. The models made a projection based on incomplete data. They were wrong.

Meanwhile, elections have been held over the past month. In the special elections to fill empty seats in Wisconsin and California. Republicans handily won both seats. A week later, city council races were held in Staunton, VA. All 4 Democrat incumbents got defeated. Last week, a presidential primary was held in Pennsylvania, the biggest of the battleground states. Though both candidates had clinched their party’s nomination, turnout was high. President Trump got 861,000 votes. Biden got 734,000 votes. That’s a hard margin of 54%-46% in President Trump’s favor. That isn’t speculation. That’s the results of a real election.

Once the campaign starts, segment like this will hurt Biden to the core:

There’s even a strong indication of pro-Biden skew in the numbers themselves. Only 37% of registered voters who told CNN they were more likely to vote for Biden said they were actually voting for Biden, as opposed to against Trump. That’s a dire figure. For comparison, polls consistently showed that about three-quarters of Barack Obama’s voters were “for” him rather than “against” his opponent.

People are simply not enthusiastic about Biden. Shoot, even Biden doesn’t seem very enthusiastic about Biden most of the time. They are, however, extremely enthusiastic about Trump — even in the supposedly “devastating” CNN poll, about 70% of those who say they will vote for Trump say they’re voting for him, not against Biden.

That’s what’s called an enthusiasm gap. Sleepy Joe’s voters will turn out on election day. The difference is that President Trump’s voters will show up for phone banking, door-knocking and whatever else they’re asked to do. That’s a massive GOTV advantage in President Trump’s favor.

That’s why listening to people who say that this will be a tight race are wrong. Ditto with people who say that ‘anyone who tells you that they know how this election will turn out isn’t telling you the truth’. If you only look at the horserace figure without digging into the methodology, things look difficult for President Trump. Once you start putting the entire campaign together, including the data analytics, the GOTV machine and the fundraising, it isn’t difficult to figure out that President Trump is heading for re-election.

That’s before talking about the greatest GOTV operation in the history of campaigning, aka the #MAGA Rallies. They’re likely returning within the next 2-3 weeks. While Trump rallies attract 35,000-50,000 people both inside the arena and in the overflow, Joe will do remote interviews that attract voters by the dozens. The thought that this election will be close is laughable.

The difference between my legislator, Dan Wolgamott, and Mary Franson, who represents Alexandria and Long Prairie, isn’t difficult to detect. This week’s e-letter updates offer a perfect example of the difference between a compliant DFL legislator and a Republican legislative leader who’s capable of thinking for herself. Let’s start with Rep. Wolgamott’s letter.

It opens with “I want to start by acknowledging how much Minnesota and our community is hurting right now. The death of George Floyd is still incredibly fresh in our minds, and the COVID-19 pandemic continues to challenge us in unprecedented ways.” That’s a terrible read on things. I don’t dispute that Minneapolis is still hurting, though not for the reasons listed in Rep. Wolgamott’s letter. St. Cloud is worried about reopening its economy, not George Floyd.

Further, most people think that COVID is pretty much finished. After seeing all the looting, rioting and protesting the past 2 weeks, it’s clear that social distancing and phased reopenings are history. Despite that becoming obvious to anyone with eyes, Wolgamott included this in his e-letter update:

This “Phase 3” of reopenings and lifted restrictions will begin on Wednesday, June 10, and includes the following:

  1. Restaurants can begin offering indoor dining while maintaining social distancing, requiring reservations, and seating no more than 50 percent occupancy.
  2. Indoor social gatherings can take place with 10 people or less; outdoor social gatherings can take place with 25 people or less.
  3. Gyms, personal fitness and yoga studios, and martial arts may open at 25 percent capacity.
  4. Indoor entertainment venues, such as theaters and concert halls, can open at 25 percent capacity.
  5. Recreational indoor entertainment venues, such as bowling alleys, arcades, and museums may open at 25 percent capacity.
  6. Personal services, such as salons, tattoo parlors, and barbershops, may increase occupancy rates to 50 percent while requiring reservations.
  7. Outdoor entertainment venues, such as sporting events, concerts, and theaters may open at 25 percent capacity.
  8. Places of worship can increase occupancy rates to 50 percent.

Compare that puppy dog compliance with Rep. Franson’s e-letter update:

Today, the governor announced Phase 3 of reopening the economy, which will begin June 10th. This means that indoor dining will be open at 50% capacity, with safety measures like masks and social distancing. Salons and personal services will increase to 50% capacity as well, with all the same safety measures they are currently using.

New openings will include pools opening at 50% capacity, fitness centers and theaters at 25% capacity up to 250 people, and churches at 50% capacity or up to 250 people. Additionally, Phase 3 includes social gatherings of 25 people or less. More information on these new guidelines can be found here.

While this is another step in the right direction, I am extremely disappointed that these restrictions still seem arbitrary and unscientific. Instead of keeping businesses closed or severely reduced, we need to focus our efforts on protecting our nursing homes and long-term care facilities so we can begin the process of rebuilding our economy.

Notice that Rep. Franson didn’t try hiding Gov. Walz’s decision to send COVID-infected seniors back to nursing homes. That’s led to hundreds of deaths that could’ve been avoided.

Wolgamott swept that decision under the rug. Franson didn’t. While George Floyd’s family grieves for him, the DFL hasn’t changed their policy towards assisted living facilities. The DFL rioted in Minneapolis over George Floyd’s death. In fact they’re planning on dismantling the Minneapolis Police Department over it. Over the past 10 years, there’ve been, at most, a dozen officer-involved shootings. Riots erupted over that. At least 700 Minnesota seniors have unnecessarily died by getting exposed to COVID.

The DFL didn’t utter a word on that. In fact, the DFL hasn’t protected seniors since COVID started. The picture that Wolgamott unwittingly painted is that African-Americans are worthy of rioting over and changing our police force over but COVID-infected seniors aren’t worthy of even an oversight hearing or a mention from the DFL.

Republicans are working hard to protect seniors while reopening Minnesota’s economy safely. Thus far, the DFL have acted like little puppies. Don’t forget that when you vote this fall.

In this column, WSJ columnist James Freeman essentially indicted Minnesota’s DFL Gov. Tim Walz. Gov. Walz is following in Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s footsteps in putting nursing home residents at risk. This isn’t surprising since Democrats are fairly used to following a script.

It’s been known for more than a month that the elderly and those with weak immune systems can’t handle the COVID virus. Despite that understanding, “Minnesota has been implementing the disastrous Covid-19 strategy made famous by New York’s Gov. Andrew Cuomo. The essence of the plan is to forcefully reduce the income of people at low risk, while simultaneously increasing the chances of virus exposure for those at high risk.”

This is how crises get extended. Sending COVID-infected seniors to nursing homes is a potential death sentence. This isn’t putting 2 and 2 together and getting 4. It’s more like putting 2 and 2 together and getting 9. Freeman cites a Star Tribune article, too:

Early in the pandemic, the Minnesota Department of Health turned to nursing homes and other long-term care facilities to relieve the burden on hospitals that were at risk of being overwhelmed by COVID-19 patients. Minnesota hospitals have since discharged dozens of infected patients to nursing homes, including facilities that have undergone large and deadly outbreaks of the disease, state records show…

One such facility, North Ridge Health and Rehab in New Hope, has accepted 42 patients from hospitals and other long-term care facilities since mid-April even as the coronavirus has raged through its 320-bed nursing home, killing 48 of its patients and infecting scores more.

The first outbreak of COVID deaths happened at a nursing home in Kirkland, Washington. It was above-the-fold-front-page news for a week or more. I can picture someone slow like Gov. Walz not picking up on that clue but there’s no reason why his public health people shouldn’t have picked up on that. Instead of noticing, Minnesotans got another example of the blind leading the blind.

According to this KARE11 video, the Walz administration didn’t figure out a plan to fix the Walz-induced crisis until 2 weeks ago:

The Walz administration’s cavalier attitude towards problem-solving is disgraceful. They’ve created more problems than they’ve solved. It’s fair to say that the Walz administration didn’t protect nursing home residents. He’s as disgraceful as Gov. Cuomo. Then again, what would you expect from a pair of airheaded Democrats?

Joe Biden thinks that wearing a mask “projects leadership.” That’s what he told CNN’s Dana Bash in an interview right after Memorial Day. Later, Biden said “The truth of the matter is that I think you’re supposed to lead by example, and one of the things our governor has said he wants to keep social distancing, stay at home has been the order, until June 1 of this year. And so I think it’s important that – look, 100,000 deaths and at least 35,000 to 50,000 were avoidable, but for lack of attention and ego, I think. And just – so – and you know me, I’m usually the last one to leave an event, I like interacting with people. But, I hope to be able to do more, but we’re going to do it by the numbers, because I think it’s important because this is not over.”

Wearing a mask in the situations President Trump found himself in — outside, in bright sunlight and with family — are situations that don’t require a mask, especially outside in bright sunlight. COVID doesn’t last long in that situation. A potent argument can be made that using the right precautions in the right situations is leadership.

Be that as it may, President Trump showed leadership on January 31 when he stopped flights with China. What did Joe do? Check it out:

Later, Biden admitted that stopping those flights were the right thing to do. Leadership comes from getting the big decisions right the first time. Had Biden been president, he would’ve let untold numbers of COVID-infected people into the United States, spreading the contagion across the nation. That would’ve created a crisis the likes of which we haven’t seen since 1918.

President Trump brought together captains of industry in the Rose Garden to put together a response to testing. CVS, Walmart, Walgreens and other companies brainstormed ideas to make testing super-accessible and free. Joe Biden wouldn’t have had a clue who to bring together. President Trump told Peter Navarro to get ventilators built ASAP. Here’s what happened:

“In under 11 days, General Motors sourced materials, converted a manufacturing facility and trained a workforce to build lifesaving ventilators in Kokomo, IN.” Saving lives by manufacturing ventilators in record time is bigtime leadership that Joe Biden couldn’t make happen if Americans’ lives depended on it. Wearing a goofy-looking mask when he’s already social distanced is preening for the cameras. It isn’t leadership.

President Trump has his faults but they’re nothing like Biden’s. Biden provided ‘leadership’ on the 1994 crime bill that started mass incarcerations. President Trump provided leadership by fixing Biden’s mess:

Tearing families apart isn’t leadership. Reuniting families requires leadership.

Judge Michael McHaney criticized Illinois Democrat Gov. J.B. Pritzker in his ruling. In fact, Judge McHaney’s ruling was more of a blistering than a ruling. In his blistering/ruling, Judge McHaney opened by saying “Since the inception of this insanity, the following regulations, rules or consequences have occurred: I won’t get COVID if I get an abortion but I will get COVID if I get a colonoscopy.”

Judge McHaney’s ruling stings Gov. Pritzker after that by saying “Selling pot is essential but selling goods and services at a family- owned business is not. Pot wasn’t even legal and pot dispensaries didn’t even exist in this state until five months ago and, in that five months, they have become essential but a family-owned business in existence for five generations is not. A family of six can pile in their car and drive to Carlyle Lake without contracting COVID but, if they all get in the same boat, they will.”

Later in the ruling, Judge McHaney unleashes his harshest criticism:

The defendant in this case orders you to stay home and pronounces that, if you leave the state, you are putting people in danger, but his family members traveled to Florida and Wisconsin because he deems such travel essential. One initial rationale why the rules don’t apply to him is that his family farm had animals that needed fed. Try selling that argument to farmers who have had to slaughter their herds because of disruption in the supply chain.

Then there’s this:

Make no mistake, these executive orders are not laws. They are royal decrees. Illinois citizens are not being governed, they are being ruled. The last time I checked Illinois citizens are also Americans and Americans don’t get ruled.

Pritzker employed the Democrats’ time-tested tactic of do-as-I-say-not-as-I-do. His family lived in Florida virtually all winter while Ron DeSantis managed things properly. Pritzker got them out of Illinois while he mismanaged the COVID crisis.

Read Judge McHaney’s short ruling. It’s well worth the time spent.

Powerlineblog’s Scott Johnson has a bunch of pointed questions that he’d like to ask Gov. Tim Walz. The bad news is that Gov. Walz isn’t interested in answering difficult questions that doesn’t have a good answer to. The worse news is that the DFL legislature is acting as Gov. Walz’s Praetorian guard. The DFL House won’t untighten the controls so real reporters who would ask difficult questions can ask those difficult questions:

The Washington Free Beacon’s Collin Anderson reports on my exclusion from the daily COVID-19 press briefings by the state authorities in “Minnesota governor stonewalls conservative journalist.” Working on the story, Collin elicited statements from the governor’s office and from the Minnesota Department of Health regarding my exclusion. By contrast, my inquiries have elicited the sound of silence, so we’re getting somewhere.

Collin forwarded the responses to his inquiries for my comments. Walz’s office sent a message explaining that “the Governor’s press conferences are covered by the Minnesota Capitol Press Corps, a dozen media outlets that are credentialed by the Minnesota State Legislature, rent office space in the Minnesota Capitol building, and routinely cover state government.”

What is Tim Walz trying to hide? Why is he afraid of answering difficult questions? If your policies are right, there isn’t a reason to be worried about the questions.

Thus far, though, Gov. Walz has had to be dragged kicking and screaming into every major decision. He hasn’t done things proactively. The DFL governor has been reactive with each major policy reversal.

The fact that Gov. Walz hasn’t made any confident-looking major COVID-19 decisions signals that he wouldn’t want to answer Scott’s questions. That’s because Scott’s questions wouldn’t be softballs, though they might include follow-up questions that were tougher than the introductory questions. Gov. Walz is like the general in this MASH episode:

The general’s famous final words were “Just wait a minute. This is a press conference. The last thing I want to do is answer a lot of questions.” I’m betting heavily that Tim Walz identifies with that general from MASH. It’s one thing to get asked softball questions from KARE11, MPR, the Strib or KSTP. That’s easy. It’s another to take questions from Alpha News or Powerline. Then again, most citizens would ask better questions than the Twin Cities media on the subject of COVID.

Let’s settle this. Scott Johnson and Kevin Roche have done fantastic work on the topic of COVID-19, though that’s been mostly because of their tenacity. It isn’t like Gov. Walz has helped whatsoever.

Two months ago, protesters pushed Gov. Walz into changing policies with their protests. It’s time to push Gov. Walz into other policy changes. Perhaps, we’ll see more capitulations by Gov. Walz like this:

Through consultation with Minnesota faith leaders, the Minnesota Department of Health has developed additional guidance for faith-based communities, places of worship, and services. Starting May 27, places of worship may open at 25 percent occupancy if they adhere to social distancing and other public health guidelines to keep congregants safe.

“I have had many meaningful conversations with faith leaders over the last few weeks,” Governor Walz said. “From a personal and public health perspective, the decision around places of worship has been a challenging one since the beginning of the pandemic. We know large gatherings of people raise the risk of spreading COVID-19. We also know worship is an essential part of many Minnesotans’ lives, including mine.”

GOV. WALZ TRANSLATION: After President Trump pulled the rug out from underneath me, I’ve had to modify my policy. My initial policy didn’t make any sense but now it’s totally indefensible. Churches are now open.

Seriously, Gov. Walz has, once again, gotten dragged kicking and screaming into a decision he didn’t want to make. Perhaps that’s why he doesn’t want to answer Scott Johnson’s and Kevin Roche’s questions.

Saying that Minnesota DFL Gov. Tim Walz’s incompetence is hiding in plain sight is understatement. That isn’t really in dispute at this point. What’s hiding in plain sight, though, is the litany of leadership sins committed by Gov. Walz. What’s frightening is the fact that this isn’t a comprehensive list. Harold Hamilton’s commentary reads like an indictment against Gov. Walz’s administration.

Harold’s commentary starts by saying “It’s become quite clear that Governor Tim Walz is in over his head. He’s overmatched in this crisis. He’s displayed the character traits and leadership qualities (or lack thereof) of a poor, incompetent leader. This assessment isn’t partisan. It isn’t about name calling or scoring points. Instead, it’s a painful, morose realization that our chief executive didn’t rise to the occasion and the people of Minnesota will pay the price. Good leaders in a crisis impose order on chaos.. They provide clear direction and timely strategic guidance for staff and the troops. They inspire confidence and boost morale when the chips are down.”

Gov. Walz isn’t a leader. It’s charitable to say that he’s been a failure. It’s obvious that he’s hesitated in making important decisions. Many decisions don’t make sense. Big box stores can open fully but churches that hold 3,000+ people are limited to gatherings of 10 or less. What part of that thinking makes sense?

Poor leaders are fragile and insecure. This insecurity manifests itself in a façade of bravado and arrogance. It’s evident in the leader lashing out in the face of constructive criticism and having their dictates examined.

This is typical of Tim Walz. This week, when asked about GOP leaders questioning the continued closure of houses of worship, he snapped, “I get that some people think COVID-19 isn’t a big deal.”

That’s beyond thin-skinned. It’s what a constitutionally illiterate politician would say. The hostility Gov. Walz and the DFL have shown towards churches is palpable. The only people of faith that the DFL care about are the people who advocate for bigger government. The DFL doesn’t represent people of faith. The DFL represents a portion of people of faith.

Poor leaders also refuse to change course in the face of new information. Doing so requires the leader to admit the current course of action isn’t correct. In short, it requires a leader to admit that he’s wrong. It requires the leader to acknowledge that mission accomplishment is paramount and the leader’s ego and pride is of no consequence.

John Maynard Keynes, the famous economist, once said “When the facts change, I change my mind. What do you do, Sir?” Gov. Walz has little in common with Keynes. Gov. Walz has spent too much time in Washington, DC, where he’s stayed trapped in DC’s prison of 2 ideas.

When asked about his rationale for essentially closing indoor church services, only an idiot would suggest that Republicans don’t think COVID is a big deal. This isn’t how an intellectual heavyweight would’ve replied.

This story wouldn’t be complete without criticizing the Twin Cities media, too. They haven’t asked Gov. Walz a single difficult question challenging his policies. Powerline’s Scott Johnson found out that only people who rent office space in the Capitol Building are invited to the briefings. That’s an efficient way of avoiding difficult questions. Why hasn’t the Strib, the Pi-Press or KSTP pinned Gov. Walz down on why they’re still experiencing a nursing home/LTC crisis? Why haven’t they forced Gov. Walz to explain why the model he’s using was thrown together over the weekend by grad students? That’s Three Stooges type of stuff. You can’t make this stuff up.

It breaks my heart to hear the owner of The Loop say “Get ready to hear more and more bankruptcies declared in the month of June. There’ll be a ton of them and that’s a shame. Shame on the Governor for what he did today. I’m sorry. That’s how I feel.”

Let’s be clear about this. Gov. Walz has done a terrible job limiting COVID deaths, especially in LTC facilities. Bankruptcies are up, especially within the hospitality industry. Shutting down the economy was meant to flatten the curve, not flatten Minnesota’s hospitality industry. If I were grading Gov. Walz’s failure during this crisis, he wouldn’t have to worry about grade inflation. I’d give him an F- or lower, if possible. By comparison, I’d give the Twin Cities Media a D- at best.