Archive for the ‘Pete Stauber’ Category

Imagine Tim Scott campaigning with Jason Lewis on Lake Street during the Senate’s August recess. Then imagine them holding an invitation-only townhall with residents who own businesses or homes where the looting, rioting and violence happened. Schedule it to last 2-3 hrs. if needed. Tell the audience that respectful questions will be accepted but that that agitators’ taunts will be dealt with by security.

The point is that Lewis and Scott would be doing something that the DFL hasn’t done in a generation or more. The DFL has listened occasionally, which is what Sen. Scott and Rep. Lewis would do. The difference is that, after listening to the respectful audience, Lewis and Scott would propose solutions to the problems that they’d heard.

Tim Scott could tell the audience how he’d dealt with racism, including while he’s a US senator. Imagine Tim Scott walking into the room with Jason Lewis, then telling them that Sen. Scott has a bill that would fix the vast majority of problems the audience has cited. Imagine Tim Scott and Jason Lewis passionately embracing police reform and school choice.

During Sen. Scott’s interview with Guy Benson, Benson said told Sen. Scott that the major networks didn’t cover his historic speech after the Democrats voted against the starting of debate on Sen. Scott’s JUSTICE Act. Imagine Tim Scott asking that minority audience why Tina Smith voted to prevent debate and amendments on Sen. Scott’s bill.


What are Democrats afraid of? If their ideas are good, they should welcome this debate. That’s why they don’t want that debate. Democrats have a monopoly stranglehold on the African-American vote, which has led them to not compete for African-American votes with ideas. If Sen. Scott offered legitimate solutions, there’s a legitimate chance that minorities, not just African-Americans, would withdraw their support from Democrats. That thought must frighten the daylights out of Democrats.

The truth is that Democrats love minorities — for their votes. Anything beyond that, Democrats would rather ignore voters. These Democrats’ agenda is purely ideological. Whether it’s health care, climate change or police reform, Democrats would rather insist than listen to voters. Check this out from Glenn Reynolds:

Not only did the Democrats block debate on the bill, but Scott has been subjected to racial slurs — Sen. Dick Durbin used the word ”token” to describe Scott’s bill, a racial code word that Scott called out. And Democrat-supporting callers to Scott’s office are subjecting him to racial slurs and threats and calling him a “sellout.” That for pushing a revolutionary piece of reform legislation.

So do Black lives matter to Democrats? Not if there are votes at stake, apparently. Bear that in mind between now and November.

Democrats are the party of racist remarks and no solutions. It isn’t that these Democrats are do-nothing Democrats. It’s that they’re opposed to any solutions. It’s their ideological wish list or it’s nothing.

Former Minnesota Gopher and Minnesota Viking football player Jack Brewer has made a major change in recent years. He used to raise money for President Obama. Now he’s advocating for President Trump.

When asked why he switched, Brewer said “I’m going to take the guy who’s actually putting in the policies that are going to make life better for my young black son and my young black daughter, versus somebody who gives me lip service — like, unfortunately, the Democrats have done for our community for years.”

Results have made the difference with changing minds. This is what’s changing minds:

Mr. Trump and his reelection team are aggressively courting black voters amid a strong economy that has reduced black unemployment to 5.5%, lowest in history. The Trump campaign launched its “Black Voices for Trump” coalition in Atlanta last month.

It isn’t just the Trump campaign. The GOP is touting what President Trump has done for the black community, too:


Then there’s this:

“Donald Trump will get over 20% of the black vote,” Mr. Brewer said in an interview. “That is what’s going to win the election. Why? Because there hasn’t been a Republican to even try to go in and talk to the black community. They don’t go there. They don’t even try. I think he’s trying, finally.”

If President Trump gets 15% of the black vote in Pennsylvania or Michigan, he’ll be re-elected easily. If President Trump got 15% of the black vote nationally, he’d win with 375+ electoral votes.

The lessons that Republicans should take from this is that they should fight for every voting group in the nation. When Chip Cravaack defeated Jim Oberstar in 2010, the GOP powers-that-be in Minnesota told him not to waste time on the Iron Range, that it was a lost cause. The first place he campaigned was the Iron Range. Because he had union roots, his story played well with Iron Rangers.

After Chip’s big win in 2010, he lost his re-election bid. Each year after that, the races were tight. In 2018, Pete Stauber won. This year, he’s expected to win re-election as a Republican. That will mark the first time a Republican has won re-election in MN-8 since before WWII. I know the situations aren’t the same but the principles are transferable.

The point is that, bit-by-bit, Republicans will make inroads with communities of color if they work at it. They just need to show up and do the work.

By all accounts, Wednesday night’s Trump rally was a major success for Pete Stauber. First, President Trump is wildly popular in the Eighth District. Next, Stauber got a ton of positive attention during the campaign rally. Third and perhaps most importantly, President Trump drew a ton of people to the rally. Check out the people gathered at a parking ramp near the arena:


Stauber’s campaign manager must’ve smiled after seeing that picture. Stauber’s campaign manager must’ve been pleased to see Pete handle the big spotlight this beautifully, too:

That doesn’t guarantee a Stauber victory this fall but it’ll guarantee him tons of favorable press. This report noted something incredible:

At least 25 percent of the audience was under the age of 30, and around 40 percent were women. The senior citizen percentage was less than 10 percent — the lowest I’ve ever seen at a Republican event. Other than the hundred or so party leaders, this was a vastly different crowd from the Minnesota Republican Convention that I attended in Duluth three weeks ago. None of the attendees I spoke with in the concession line at the rally were politically active (other than voting) and none were born-and-bred Republicans.

If that’s the case, then I’m inclined to move this race from the toss-up category to the slightly leans GOP category. That isn’t good news for the DFL because they’ve got 3 top-tier candidates who are beating the daylights out of each other through the mid-August primary.