Archive for the ‘Ben Carson’ Category

Gianno Caldwell’s op-ed shines a light on the pathway for President Trump’s re-election. In his op-ed, Caldwell, an African-American, states “President Trump and Republicans have delivered for the black community on tangible policies that have had a positive impact — something the Democrats never achieved.”

President Trump is fantastic at exciting his base voters. That’s the strongest part of his campaign game. Policywise, President Trump is excellent at delivering for African-Americans. Don’t trust me. Just ask Alice Marie Johnson. Better yet, listen to Sen. Tim Scott, (R-SC), and HUD Secretary Ben Carson. Sen. Scott and Secretary Carson worked together on the Opportunity Zones provisions in the Trump tax cuts.

The Opportunity Zones provisions transformed inner city hell holes into potential prosperous oases in virtually no time. Minority unemployment rates didn’t drop to historic lows accidentally. They happened because President Trump, Sen. Scott and Secretary Carson worked together to make something beautiful happen. Let’s remember that Carson grew up in inner-city Detroit. Saying that he was dirt poor is understatement. I don’t know where Sen. Scott grew up. I just know that he grew up dirt poor, too. President Trump didn’t grow up dirt poor but he was raised as a real estate developer. He understands what it takes to turn a run-down neighborhood into a rising middle-class neighborhood.

Each day, Tim Scott and Ben Carson should hold a press conference and ask the reporters what Joe Biden’s specific plans are for fixing minority neighborhoods. They should then cite the accomplishments that President Trump has made already, then report that they plan on working with him to expand opportunity scholarships and school choice.

Each day, Tim Scott and Ben Carson should be sent to Baltimore, Minneapolis, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh or Detroit. Their day should include meeting with parents and entrepreneurs willing to invest in these neighborhoods. It should include a discussion on how these investors/developers could establish a scholarship fund with a little help from the tax code.

It should also include a conversation with parents on what their ‘ideal neighborhood’ would include. Getting investors to invest in these neighborhoods builds a trust that’s long been missing. Doesn’t that suggest that that’s what’s needed immediately?

Challenge Democrats to talk about what their plans are for revitalizing neighborhoods and building the schools of the future. The dirty little secret is that the Democrats can’t deviate from their ancient blueprint of throwing more money at a problem. That’s because the unions won’t let them change the blueprint.

Tim Scott and Ben Carson are 2 of the calmest-sounding people in government. If they can’t break through to apolitical parents, then this nation is lost. I don’t believe it’s lost. That’s why, after watching this video again, I’m more optimistic than ever:

Let’s force the Democrats to defend their record on racial policies. Republicans, unfortunately, don’t have a great record either. At least Republicans can say that they’re willing to change to make minority lives better. Democrats can’t say that.

If ever there was a need to stop a bad policy before it started, it would be to stop the #DefundThePolice movement. It’s one of the most absurd ideas ever. This article by Charlie LeDuff illustrates why investing in better police training, more officers on patrol and better salaries is the ticket to better outcomes. That doesn’t mean that our police forces don’t need cleaning up. They definitely need that. It’s that dismantling the police, which the Minneapolis just voted to do, is a terrible idea.

LeDuff’s article highlights the folly of Minneapolis’s policy. In his article, LeDuff writes about India Williams. According to the article, “India Williams was shot just over five years ago. ‘All I want from the man who shot me is an apology,’ says India, now 12. She has yet to receive one. In fact, her case has been closed, her shooter never charged, and is presumed still at large.” Then there’s this story:

Mayana Lanton, 14, was shot through the face in 2018 as she stood inside her west side home, readying herself for school. Like India, she was a media darling for a few weeks. Now the cameras are gone and her story forgotten. Her shooter, too, has never been apprehended.

That’s the future Minneapolis is destined to have if its citizens don’t rescue the city from its city council. The first responsibility that each unit of government is assigned is protecting its citizens. There’s no proof that the Detroit Police Department, aka DPD, is capable of consistently living up to that responsibility. Minneapolis Police Department Chief Medaria Arradondo has a difficult fight ahead. To say that he looks battle-fatigued in this interview is understatement:

Barring a miracle, Minneapolis might be in Detroit’s situation within 5 years. Here’s more from LeDuff:

The children of Detroit deserve better schools, better housing, cleaner water and summer camps. Funding these priorities by defunding patrol officers, however, is squeezing blood from a turnip. So where do we find the financial capital to invest in human capital? Start with the municipal contracts.

It might start with Tim Scott’s and Ben Carson’s opportunity zones. What’s also needed are opportunity scholarships and some federal grants to hire police officers at a decent salary.

The police department is hiring. But be forewarned. Starting salary is $40,000 a year. And the risks are obvious.

If we want to rebuild the City of Detroit, which we should, public safety must be everyone’s highest priority. If we want to stop the #DefundThePolice movement, we must eliminate the thought that something is irreparably damaged. People thought that during Jimmy Carter’s term in office. People said that the job of president was too big for one man. Then Ronald Reagan got elected. It took a little time but things started improving. It wasn’t that the job was too big for one man. It’s that the job was too big for Jimmy Carter.

What Detroit needs is a turnaround specialist with crisis management skills. I wonder if Mitt Romney is interested.

For the past 2 weeks, Democrats have passionately insisted that the U.S. has a problem with “systemic racism.” I don’t believe that but let’s stipulate that for the sake of this experiment. If that’s true, the logical reaction to that would be to attack that system. The target, therefore, would be the white power structure and white privilege.

While later reaction included looting of the iconic Macys in NYC and other iconic symbols of white society, the initial reaction was to burn down minority neighborhoods. Saying that that’s illogical is understatement. There’s nothing in the initial reaction that suggests activists were speaking truth to power. The rioters and looters seemed far more interested in causing mayhem and spreading fear in minority neighborhoods than they seemed interested in uprooting the white power structure. Let’s ask some important questions. Let’s start with these:

  1. How does destroying a minority neighborhood uproot the white power structure?
  2. Does destroying minority-owned pharmacies and grocery stores make things worse or better for minorities?
  3. Doesn’t demolishing the neighborhood deli or neighborhood hardware store trash the hard work of minority business owners?
  4. When these ‘neighborhood institutions’ get demolished, how many years back does that set the entire neighborhood?

These aren’t trivial questions for the survival and prosperity of neighborhoods. They’re central to the survival and prosperity of neighborhoods.

I’d argue that the rioting and looting sounded more like a turf war between rival gangs than it sounds like another painful chapter in the civil rights movement. This isn’t about reclaiming neighborhoods. It’s about looting and vandalism. Ben Carson’s story is something to be examined. He didn’t get ahead by latching onto one government program after another. Dr. Carson got ahead because his mother taught him to spend tons of time reading.

Certainly, a major portion of his education came in schools but another major part of his education came from investing time in reading. That’s the blueprint that’s needed to change minority societies and neighborhoods. It worked once. It’ll work again if it’s tried.

Let’s further stipulate that this is a political issue. Robert Davi outlines it in this interview:

This isn’t a Democrat-only or Republican-only problem. It’s a problem that country club Republicans and limousine liberals have avoided for generations. For all of the nasty things said about this president, he’s been interested in solving problems. Let’s bring people of color together from both sides of the aisle at the White House. Let’s see President Trump bring together leaders in the Cabinet Room or somewhere prestigious inside the White House. Let’s have this discussion. Let’s put solutions on the table. Then, let’s establish timetables to accomplish those goals. It’s more than possible.

This is the United States. When we put our best minds together, there’s nothing we can’t accomplish. That’s only possible if we work together in a good faith fashion. That means not inviting Nancy Pelosi or Chuck Schumer to this meeting. It means inviting Dr. Carson, Bob Woodson, Jack Brewer, Bob Johnson and other who are willing to put their differences aside to make minority lives better.

Ronald Reagan believed that the victories he got credit for were won first by the American people. Finally, let’s stipulate that We The People will always drive the most essential societal changes. That’s how it’s always been. MLK didn’t change society by taking orders from the government. Ditto with President Reagan or President Trump. They changed societies because they won over the people. They didn’t make an impact by forcing things down people’s throats.

This past week, a variety of articles on the 2020 presidential election have caught my attention. They’ve left me wondering whether (or how much) the dynamics of the 2020 race are changing. This article has me wondering whether President Trump will win a significantly higher percentage of the African-American vote. In 2016, he won 8% of the African-American vote nationwide. Imagine what would happen if President Trump got 15% of the African-American vote in Pennsylvania.

If Democrats don’t flip back Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin, they can’t get to 270 electoral votes. Technically, they can but it isn’t likely. According to Pete Hegseth’s reporting, First Immanuel Baptist Church Pastor Todd Johnson has seen a change in his congregation. According to Pastor Johnson, “the Opportunity Zone [provision] in the city of brotherly love — created by the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act — is working.”

Johnson then said “Some who were hardcore Democrats are not quite as hardcore now. And then there are some who are leaving the Democratic Party in Philadelphia. I’m hopeful that by the time the election rolls around in November, we will see more people leaving the Democratic Party and giving President Trump and the Republican Party a chance.”

President Trump’s Super Bowl ad featuring Alice Johnson was powerful:

When President Trump announced that Jenayah Davis was getting awarded an opportunity scholarship, everyone in the gallery applauded. All the Republicans seated on the House floor stood and applauded. Democrats stayed sitting. Democrats were overwhelmed with Trump hatred. Democrats didn’t applaud Jenayah. What isn’t shown in the video is President Trump’s exhortation to Congress to create 1,000,000 new opportunity scholarships this year.

Pelosi’s Democrats won’t do that. They can’t do that. That’s because they’re a wholly-owned subsidiary of the NEA and AFT. African-American voters are watching and noticing. They’re noticing what President Trump is doing to make their lives better. They’re noticing in increasing numbers that Democrats are all talk and no action.

Mischaracterizations are getting dismissed. By now, Prof. Borysenko’s article has become legendary. Still, it’s worth talking about the most important message from the article:

So, I headed over an hour and a half before the doors were scheduled to open—which was four hours before Trump was set to take the stage—and the line already stretched a mile away from the entrance to the arena. As I waited, I chatted with the folks around me. And contrary to all the fears expressed, they were so nice. I was not harassed or intimidated, and I was never in fear of my safety even for a moment. These were average, everyday people. They were veterans, schoolteachers, and small business owners who had come from all over the place for the thrill of attending this rally. They were upbeat and excited. In chatting, I even let it slip that I was a Democrat. The reaction: “Good for you! Welcome!”

Myths are getting shattered. It’s indisputable that President is far from perfect. Prof. Borysenko cut to the heart of the matter:

The reality is that many people I spoke to do disagree with Trump on things. They don’t always like his attitude. They wish he wouldn’t tweet so much. People who are in cults don’t question their leaders. The people I spoke with did, but the pros in their eyes far outweighed the cons. They don’t love him because they think he’s perfect. They love him despite his flaws, because they believe he has their back.

Bingo. I know that Democrats will dump a person in a heartbeat if they think it’s to their political advantage. President Trump hasn’t kept all of his promises but he’s worked tirelessly to keep them. President Trump’s policies have improved life for literally millions of Americans. He’s worked with the African-American community by including the Opportunity Zone provision in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. He did that at the request of HUD Secretary Ben Carson and Sen. Tim Scott (R-SC).

Lives are getting improved. Minority communities are noticing. That’s why it’s looking like the dynamics of this race are changing. As the saying goes, good policies make for great politics.

Minutes ago, President-Elect Donald Trump announced that he’s nominating Dr. Ben Carson to be his HUD (Housing and Urban Development) Secretary.

In his statement, President-Elect Trump said “I am thrilled to nominate Dr. Ben Carson as our next Secretary of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development. Ben Carson has a brilliant mind and is passionate about strengthening communities and families within those communities. We have talked at length about my urban renewal agenda and our message of economic revival, very much including our inner cities. Ben shares my optimism about the future of our country and is part of ensuring that this is a Presidency representing all Americans. He is a tough competitor and never gives up.”

Dr. Carson’s story is an inspirational story. In this article, Carson talked about growing up in Detroit, saying “Both of my older cousins died on the streets where I lived. I thought that was my destiny. But my mother didn’t. She changed all of that. She saved my brother and me from being killed on those streets with nothing but a library card.”

Dr. Carson will be an important part of President-Elect Trump’s outreach to African-American communities. I expect he’ll play an important part in revitalizing major urban centers economically. In the past, HUD secretaries have been bit players, with Jack Kemp being the exception. Further, I expect Democratic special interest groups to criticize him because he represents a different type of thinking. In the end, though, I expect him to win confirmation with overwhelming bipartisan support.

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