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This article, written by Slate’s Leon Neyfakh, apparently shows that Mr. Neyfakh can’t entertain alternate theories.

In the article, Neyfakh insists that Jeff Sessions is lying because he said that the reason why he recommended Jim Comey’s firing was because he was “disgusted by Comey’s handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation.” Neyfakh insists that that’s a lie because President Trump said his reason for firing Mr. Comey was because “When I decided to just do it,” Trump told Holt, “I said to myself, I said, ‘You know, this Russia thing with Trump and Russia is a made-up story—it’s an excuse by the Democrats for having lost an election that they should have won.’”

Apparently, it hasn’t dawned on Mr. Neyfakh that both statements could be true. I know with certainty that it’s possible that Jeff Sessions wanted to terminate Jim Comey because he mishandled the HRC email investigation, aka HRC “matter.” I’m equally certain that President Trump might’ve terminated Mr. Comey over the fake Russia scandal.

Later, Neyfakh wrote this:

He also said Comey had overstepped his authority as FBI director when he asserted that “no reasonable prosecutor” would pursue charges against her based on the evidence available. “It was a stunning development … a thunderous thing,” Sessions said, by way of explaining why he “had come to the conclusion that a fresh start was appropriate.”

Sessions is right. Comey overstepped his authority by making decisions traditionally left to the AG. That offense alone is grounds for immediate termination.

Yesterday, Sen. Wyden challenged Gen. Sessions. That was a mistake:

Suffice it to say that Sen. Wyden didn’t win that exchange.

By not confirming President Trump’s national security team the first day in office, Democrats are signaling that their resistance, aka their political stunt, takes precedence over national security. That’s a disgusting signal to send.

It’s one thing to not confirm Rex Tillerson immediately. There were legitimate questions about him. It’s quite another to not confirm Jeff Sessions as AG or Mike Pompeo as the director of the CIA. There weren’t any questions about whether Mssrs. Sessions and Pompeo were qualified.

Michelle Goldberg of Slate Magazine insists that “The Trump Resistance will be led by angry women.” That’s possible, though I’m a bit skeptical of that prediction. Right now, it’s being run by idiots like Chuck Schumer, Keith Ellison and Hollywood ‘stars’ like Madonna and Ashley Judd.

Why would anyone think that (I’m stealing a phrase from Rush Limbaugh) this “endless parade of human debris” is the Democrats’ ticket back into America’s hearts? Salena Zito’s column says that President Trump needs to start healing this nation’s divisions. I’d love to see it, though I can’t picture Democrats being a willing partner anytime soon. I can’t picture that after watching this video:

It’s time for Sen. Schumer, House Minority Leader Pelosi, Rep. Ellison and their legion of parasites to stop with the PR stunts and start putting America’s needs first. They can start by telling Sen. Schumer to stop resisting and start confirming President Trump’s nominees to lead his national security team:

To Sen. Schumer: Enough with the shenanigans. Start putting America first for a change.

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Cory Booker didn’t testify in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee’s confirmation hearing yesterday. In article after article, TV segment after TV segment, pundits and announcers insisted that Sen. Booker testified. This article is one such article that fits that description.

Caitlin Huey-Burns wrote that “one could almost mark January 11, 2017 as the day the 2020 presidential race began: That was the day New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker took the unprecedented opportunity to testify against colleague Jeff Sessions, Trump’s choice for attorney general.”

I watched parts of Sen. Booker’s performance. I couldn’t watch all of it because it was a lightweight’s performance masquerading as a hit job. His emotions appeared contrived or manufactured. His sincerity was totally missing. He didn’t add anything substantive to the confirmation hearing. Mostly, it was an appeal to be the next identity politics warrior for the Democratic Party. (As though they don’t have enough of those already.)

Putting it bluntly, Sen. Booker is superficial and a lightweight. Watch for yourself:

Then there’s this:

But as they settle into life in the minority in Washington, Democrats have the opportunity “to test-drive the opposition,” says Democratic strategist Jesse Ferguson. “We don’t have to accept the course of the next four years as a foregone conclusion.”

Still, Ferguson cautions that the trick is to oppose Trump’s agenda because “it is the wrong direction for the country, not … merely for the sake of obstructing.”

Thus far, they’re looking like mean-spirited obstructionists. If they continue with that tactic, it won’t be long before they’ll have to accept the course of the next four years as a foregone conclusion. After 2018, the Democratic Party will be reduced to rubble in the Senate. They’re already rubble in the House. If the Democratic Party doesn’t figure out what the voters told them this election, they’ll be in the wilderness an additional decade. That’s certainly the direction they’re heading.

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This article contains one of the most stunning political quotes I’ve ever read. When I first read it, I immediately reread it to make sure I didn’t misread it.

According to the article, Reps. Keith Ellison, (D-MN), Raul Grijalva, (D-AZ), and Mark Pocan, (D-WI), sent a letter to the Democratic Policy and Communications Committee, saying “As our party deliberates on how best to move forward, the Congressional Progressive Caucus encourages our colleagues to move beyond misguided debates such as whether to aggressively court blue-collar, rural, and inland voters or instead focus on professional, urban, and coastal Democrats.”

As a Republican, I wholeheartedly agree. Aggressively courting blue collar and rural voters is a waste of time for Democrats. Everyone’s seen pictures of the red county-blue county maps. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that 98% of the Democratic Party lives either on the East or Left Coast, big cities or college campuses.

I wrote this post to highlight how much Democrats are in denial after the election. Couple that with this trio’s letter and Corey Booker’s publicity stunt today at Jeff Session’s confirmation hearing and it’s clear that they aren’t willing to stop relying on identity politics or to admit that the Democratic Party is, right now, a niche party. Here’s the video of Booker’s ‘testimony’:

The truth is that Sen. Booker didn’t add anything substantial to the confirmation hearing. This was him taking the opportunity to grab some spotlight to further his presidential ambitions. He came across as a phony. His ‘testimony’ was contrived and poorly delivered. He came across, too, as another windbag politician lacking in sincerity. Finally, his about-face on what he said about being honored to have worked with Sen. Sessions makes him look like a cheap politician.

But I digress. I hope these Democrats keep thinking that they don’t have to moderate their positions. I hope they think the Obama coalition is all they need. That’s how they dug this hole in the first place.

Al Franken’s attempt to sink Sen. Jeff Sessions’ confirmation as the 84th Attorney General of the United States failed. It failed partly because Sen. Franken is a buffoon. It failed partly because Sen. Franken essentially called Sen. Sessions a liar. Mostly, though, Sen. Franken failed because he attacked Sen. Sessions by basing his questions on an op-ed written by an attorney named Gerald Hebert. Sen. Cruz highlighted the problem with that during his time on the clock.

Sen. Cruz started by saying “It is unfortunate to see members of this body impugn the integrity of another senator with whom we’ve served for years. It is particularly unfortunate when that attack is not backed up by the facts. Sen. Franken based his attack on an op-ed by an attorney Gerald Hebert. There is an irony in relying on Mr. Hebert because, as you well know, in 1986 during your confirmation hearing, Mr. Hebert testified then and attacked you then, making false charges against you then and, indeed, I would note that, after the 1986 hearing, two days later, Mr. Hebert was forced to recant his testimony to say that he’d given false testimony and to apologize for giving false testimony and to say “I apologize for any inconvenience I might have caused Mr. Sessions or this committee.”
Here’s the video of Sen. Franken accusing Sen. Sessions of lying:

Here’s the video of Sen. Cruz utterly dissecting Sen. Franken’s attacks:

Sen. Franken is a disgusting excuse for a human being. As a senator, he’s a joke. Personally, I’d rate him and Gov. Dayton as the worst senators in Minnesota’s history.

I’d finally add that Sen. Sessions will fly through confirmation. The hype surrounding Sen. Sessions’ confirmation has disappeared.

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If this article is accurate, then it’s safe to say that Democrats are preparing to commit political suicide. The opening paragraph states “Senate Democrats are preparing to put Donald Trump’s Cabinet picks through a grinding confirmation process, weighing delay tactics that could eat up weeks of the Senate calendar and hamper his first 100 days in office.”

It isn’t that these Democrats can stop President-Elect Trump’s cabinet nominees from becoming President Trump’s cabinet secretaries. The Democrats blew that up when Harry Reid was stupid enough to exercise the nuclear option on appointments. The minute Senate Democrats start with these tactics, rest assured that that’s the minute that President Trump schedules a trip to Missouri, Montana, Florida, Indiana, Wisconsin, North Dakota, West Virginia and Ohio.

Visits to those states will be to remind voters that their Democratic senators aren’t standing up to their obstructionist leadership. Those visits will remind people that these marshmallows aren’t part of the solution. They’re part of the toxic environment in DC that Trump’s trying to clean up.

Democrats argue that some of the president-elect’s more controversial Cabinet picks — such as Jeff Sessions for attorney general and Steven Mnuchin for treasury secretary — demand a thorough public airing.

“They’ve been rewarded for stealing a Supreme Court justice. We’re going to help them confirm their nominees, many of whom are disqualified?” fumed Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio). “It’s not obstruction, it’s not partisan, it’s just a duty to find out what they’d do in these jobs.”

Don’t be surprised if Republicans don’t utilize that quote from Sherrod Brown against him during his 2018 re-election campaign. It’d make him look petty.

This won’t make Democrats look like they’re playing fair:

“There should be recorded votes, in my view, on every one of the president’s Cabinet nominees,” said Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-CT). “Having all of these hearings before the inaugural in a thorough and fair fashion seems very difficult to do.”

One of Candidate Trump’s campaign themes was ‘Drain the swamp’. If Democrats play sore losers, which they’re apparently planning, it might be appropriate for Republicans to run on draining the Senate Democrats’ swamp in 2018.

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The perfect Democrat is a toothless Democrat. These days, there’s lots of toothless Democrats in DC. House Democrats have been toothless since January, 2011. Now it’s the Senate Democrats’ turn to feel impotent. They’re feeling impotent because outgoing Democrat Leader Harry Reid went nuclear in 2013. Now that there’s a Republican administration forming, Democrats are finding out that they can complain a lot and little else.

For instance, Sen. Joe Donnelly, (D-IN), said “Tom Price has led the charge to privatize Medicare, and for this reason, I cannot support his nomination” this past week. His statement sounds tough but Price’s confirmation is all but official. Incoming Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer would love to stop Jeff Sessions’ confirmation as Attorney General because Sen. Sessions will shut down illegal immigration. Thanks to Sen. Reid invoking the nuclear option, he’s toothless.

The best Sen. Schumer, (D-NY), can do is say that Sen. Sessions will get lots of touch questions during his confirmation hearing. It’s impossible to picture Sen. Sessions worrying much about the hearings. It’s difficult to picture any of Trump’s nominees worrying about the Democrats’ toothless trio:

Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., seemed to acknowledge that the only real weapon for Democrats is to try to make a good public case against Sessions, and hope the public starts calling for a new nominee. “We’ll be as persuasive as possible in what we say about it, hoping to reach and arouse as many people as possible.”

Good luck with that.

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This LTE, written in the form of a resolution, is one of the most idiotic LTEs that the St. Cloud Times has ever published:

This is the only proper response to such stupidity:

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Stephen Dinan’s article highlights how little leverage Democrats have in the immigration reform debate. Without writing a single new law, Sen. Sessions will be able to pressure mayors of sanctuary cities. As a result, Sen. Sessions’ opponents are coming unhinged.

For instance, Brent Wilkes, the executive director of the League of United Latin American Citizens, said “the agency would become the dispenser of terror and racial intolerance should Jeff Sessions be confirmed.” That’s mild compared with what Charles Chamberlain, head of Democracy for America, said. Chamberlain said “The handful of people who might be even less equipped than Jeff Sessions to dispense justice on behalf of the American people typically spend their weekends wearing pointy hats and burning crosses.”

Democrats are preparing to fight a losing fight against Sen. Sessions’ confirmation as the next US Attorney General. Sen. Sessions will be confirmed. The only question still undetermined is whether Democrats will do as La Raza and other special interests demand or whether they’ll vote to protect their constituents. At this point, I’m betting that they’ll follow these special interest organizations over a political cliff.

Byron York’s article lists some of the things that Sen. Sessions could do the minute he’s sworn in as the next US Attorney General.

There are laws providing for the deportation of people who entered the U.S. illegally. Laws providing for the deportation of people who entered the U.S. illegally and later committed crimes. Laws for enforcing immigration compliance at the worksite. Laws for immigrants who have illegally overstayed their visas for coming to the United States. Laws requiring local governments to comply with federal immigration law. And more.

Many of those laws have been loosened or, in some cases, completely ignored by the Obama administration. A Trump administration would not need to ask Congress to pass any new laws to deal with illegal immigration. If there was a presidential order involved in Obama’s non-enforcement, Trump could undo it, and if there were Justice Department directives involved, Sessions could undo them, and if there are Department of Homeland Security directives involved, the still-to-be-nominated secretary could undo them.

Once those laws are enforced, illegal immigration will slow to a trickle.

This would definitely change behavior:

End the embargo on worksite enforcement. “Experience has shown that employers respond very quickly and voluntarily implement compliance measures when there is an uptick in enforcement,” Vaughan notes, “because they see the potential damage to their operations and public image for being caught and prosecuted.”

Once cheap labor becomes expensive, corporate policies change quickly. That’s because companies prefer making profits rather than not making profits.

It isn’t a secret why the Democrats’ special interest groups are fighting Sen. Sessions’ confirmation. They’re right in seeing him as an existential threat to their policies. Here’s hoping that the American people punish Democrats for not fixing this crisis.

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Byron York’s article on the likely confirmation of Sen. Jeff Sessions as President Trump’s Attorney General illustrates why Democrats are legitimately frightened by what Sessions could do without legislative action.

For instance, York writes that “There are laws providing for the deportation of people who entered the U.S. illegally. Laws providing for the deportation of people who entered the U.S. illegally and later committed crimes. Laws for enforcing immigration compliance at the worksite. Laws for immigrants who have illegally overstayed their visas for coming to the United States. Laws requiring local governments to comply with federal immigration law.”

That’s quite the bargaining chip a Trump administration could use against Democrats. If Senate Democrats filibuster a Trump immigration bill, Sessions could simply start enforcing laws already on the books. That’s something Senate Democrats can’t prevent. Further, as York highlights, it’d be political suicide for Democrats to fight enforcing laws already on the books.

York also wrote that a Trump administration could force “sanctuary cities to observe the law” because “Attorney General Sessions could enforce an existing law, 8 USC 1373, which prohibits local communities from banning their officials from cooperating with federal immigration authorities.”

Democrats would be foolish to be obstructionists on immigration, especially sanctuary cities. Their obstructionism wouldn’t help them when a Trump administration reminded people of Kate Steinle or Grant Ronnebeck getting murdered by illegal aliens who had already committed felonies. While people are sympathetic towards breaking up families of illegal aliens, they aren’t sympathetic towards cities protecting violent felon aliens.

There’s little doubt that Democrats will fight this nomination though there’s no doubt that they’ll lose this fight.