Archive for the ‘Paul Gazelka’ Category

Now that Tom Bakk and David Tomassoni have made it official that they’re leaving the DFL, I can finally write about the move. The article opened by saying “In a startling political development, two longtime Minnesota DFL senators announced Wednesday they are leaving the Minnesota Senate DFL Caucus to form a new ‘Independent Caucus.'”

The article continues, saying “Sen. Tom Bakk of Cook, a senator since 2003 and former DFL candidate for governor and former DFL Senate Majority leader, and Sen. Dave Tomassoni of Chisholm, a senator since 2001, say their move is designed to become more bipartisan and moderate.” This move isn’t unpredictable. When the DFL ran pro-mining Erik Simonson out in the primary by a 73%-27% margin, the DFL sent the unmistakable signal that pro-mining legislators weren’t welcome in the DFL anymore.

Shortly after that, 5 formerly Iron Range DFL mayors endorsed President Trump. Eventually 9 former DFL mayors endorsed him. In the general election, Sen. Bakk won with only 55% of the vote, the tightest race of his career. At that point, Bakk and Tomassoni didn’t have a reason to stick with the DFL. The DFL rejected the Iron Range’s way of life, which meant their cities couldn’t support themselves anymore.

Imagine being told that being a loyal soldier for 20 years just wasn’t enough, that your constituents’ way of life had to be shut down. Tom Bakk and David Tomassoni don’t have to imagine that. That’s what just happened to them. This segment captured things perfectly:

Now it appears there was much more to that move because both Bakk and Tomassoni will get committee chairmanships. Those positions can only be appointed by Republican Senate Majority Leader Paul Gazelka.

In an update Wednesday morning, Gazelka stated, “Being a graduate of high school in Virginia, MN, I have a natural connection to the Range. I’ve worked across the aisle with Senators Bakk and Tomassoni for 10 years. I welcome their announcement and the stronger alignment we will have as a result. We share the same vision of a prosperous Iron Range and will continue to work with them to fight for jobs on the Range.”

This hurts the DFL immensely because it didn’t happen in a vacuum. These defections follow Collin Peterson getting thrashed by Michelle Fischbach in CD-7. When it comes to CD-7, Peterson was the DFL’s entire bench. The DFL isn’t getting Peterson’s seat back in the next decade, at minimum. It’s becoming clear that the DFL is the urban party. Further, the DFL can’t escape the fact that they’re the extremist party.

The DFL mayor of Minneapolis let his city get destroyed by rioters. The DFL Minneapolis City Council voted unanimously to dismantle the Minneapolis Police Department. Last week, that same City Council voted 7-6 to spend $500,000 through the end of the year on extra policing to protect against the violent crime that, predictably, skyrocketed after the dismantling vote. That outcome was predictable because officers retired, left or took medical leave after the riots.

The DFL has lots of things to figure out before the next election. If they don’t figure things out, 1 of 2 things will happen. Either Tim Walz will fight with a unified GOP legislature or a Republican governor will work with a unified GOP legislature to restore sanity to the state.

This article reports about the dispute between embattled Gov. Tim Walz and Senate Majority Leader Paul Gazelka. According to the article, “Ahead of a private meeting between the two on Thursday, Gov. Tim Walz’s office issued a stern letter admonishing the Senate Majority Leader for not taking a greater role in the state’s COVID-19 response, after repeated criticism from Republicans over the governor’s continued use of emergency powers.”

Tim Walz and the DFL own the damage done by his shutdown policies. The House DFL majority has kept Gov. Walz’s Peacetime Emergency Powers intact. They’ve voted against shutting those powers off each time a special session is called. The House DFL majority isn’t interested in declaring the emergency over. I don’t understand why they don’t.

According to KSTP 5 At Issue, the monthly reports are definitely improving. According to their reporting 12 people died as a result of COVID in March, 331 died as a result of COVID in April, with 696 dying in May (the peak), followed by 401 in June, 159 in July, followed by 217 in August. I can’t wait to hear Gov. Walz and the House DFL explain how 2 months of COVID deaths (July, August) is smaller than a single month (June). Further, I’d love hearing Gov. Walz explain how the peak was reached in May but we’re still in a crisis. BTW, my trusty calculator says that the total amount of deaths in July and August is just 54% of the deaths in May.

The first thing Republicans will do if they hold the Senate and retake the majority in the House is end Gov. Walz’s autocratic rule of the state. Further, they should vote to open indoor restaurants and change the rules on indoor seating. About 4 minutes into this video, Sen. Gazelka puts a heavy burden on Gov. Walz:

Sen. Gazelka said “I think it’s serious. I think we should take it serious but at the same time, we have to measure all these businesses closing, kids not in school. What are we gonna do about those issues as well?”

The DFL is in trouble this year. They’re running ads saying that their candidates will vote to keep your health care. What they aren’t talking about is whether they’ll vote to send kids back to school. In the suburbs, sending kids back to school is infinitely more important to voters. Further, the DFL won’t get away with saying that they’re for sending kids back to school if it can be done safely. Everyone knows it can be done safely. That line is just thrown in to protect EdMinn teachers. Private and Christian schools are open in other states. Those schools haven’t had anything resembling an outbreak so it can be done safely. Period. Full Stop.

If Gov. Walz and the DFL want to face a hord of angry voters this fall and in 2022, they should just keep doing what they’re doing. Thanks to Gov. Walz’s and the DFL’s mishandling of the COVID crisis while taking us from a surplus to a major deficit while needlessly driving family-run businesses into bankrupty, Gov. Walz and the DFL will get to face that angry mob soon.

After reading this article, I wasn’t surprised to find Senate Majority Leader Paul Gazelka’s tweet:


The article that Sen. Gazelka linked to is hostile to the Iron Range way of life. It essentially says that the metro DFL wants Iron Rangers to live in poverty:

Last weekend, the DFL party officially adopted a resolution calling for a moratorium banning copper-nickel mining projects in Minnesota, according to the DFL Environmental Caucus’s Facebook page. The move is the latest sign that the policies endorsed by the party are moving further toward the agenda’s of urban environmentalists and further away from the rural roots of the party that support farmers and laborers.

Democrats insist that they are the party that insists on following the science. That’s a lie. They’ve said that it’s impossible to safely mine precious metals. I wrote this post in 2013. Here’s the major takeaway of the post:

In 1936, Kennecott constructed evaporation ponds to store and evaporate mine water originating from the Bingham Canyon watershed. Over time, additional ponds were constructed to increase capacity, and the area became known as the South Jordan Evaporation Ponds (SJEP). The ponds were used for mine water until 1965 and for periodic storage of runoff water until 1987. SJEP use was discontinued in 1987.

Studies in the early 1990s concluded that there were elevated levels of heavy metals in the soil where the holding ponds had been located. Kennecott took responsibility for the impacts and agreed to reclaim and remediate the SJEP area. The removal work was undertaken pursuant to an EPA Administrative Order on Consent (AOC).

A massive clean-up operation began in 1994 involving the removal of pond sediment and six additional inches of underlying native soil. The material removed from Daybreak was permanently relocated to the Kennecott Blue Water Repository as part of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) clean up. At this time, some sediment, with a low concentration of lead and arsenic but an elevated sulfate concentration were consolidated onsite and capped with topsoil and re-vegetated. In 2001, the EPA issued a Record of Decision stating that the removal action adequately satisfied the remedial objectives and EPA determined that no further action was required. An Operation and Maintenance Plan (O&M Plan) was established to address
further management of the consolidation site.

Pursuant to agreements between the EPA, UDEQ and Kennecott, Kennecott began removing the remaining sediments at the consolidation site under the guideline of the O&M Plan. In 2006, Kennecott, the EPA and the UDEQ entered into an agreement solidifying the unrestricted residential and commercial use clean-up standards for the entire site.

In early 2007, the consolidated pond sediment removal project was completed. In 2008, the EPA and UDEQ issued a Consent Decree for the ground water cleanup efforts.

In other words, the DFL is the party of science except if it gets in the way of their political agenda. That isn’t intellectually consistent. The DFL knows about this. Kennecott’s example has been thrown in their face multiple times.

Not only does the party platform now officially oppose copper-nickel mining, something mining supporters have long suspected, but it also calls for increasing the use of wind and solar, which require enormous amounts of copper, nickel, and cobalt. The platform also opposes nuclear power, which along with hydroelectric power are the only sources of reliable carbon-free electricity.

How do you rely on wind and solar energy without the raw materials to make wind turbines or solar panels? Does the DFL think that these materials just miraculously appear at the manufacturing plant when they’re needed?

Iron Rangers appear to be figuring things out. They’re realizing that this is what’s happening:

It’s time for Tom Bakk and the rest of the Iron Range DFL delegation to flip the metro DFL the bird. The metro DFL doesn’t care about Iron Rangers’ families. Republicans share their priorities. Susan Kent and Ryan Winkler don’t.

Yesterday, DFL Gov. Tim Walz extended his foolish shelter-in-place order until May 4th. As I talked about in this post, Gov. Walz didn’t ask the right questions. If he’d asked the right questions, he would’ve asked what would’ve happened had Minnesotans had just followed the CDC’s guidelines without shutting down businesses.

State Rep. Mary Franson just sent out her weekly e-letter to her constituents and various members of the media. I happen to be one of those media people who have gotten her e-letter update. This week’s e-letter update talks quite a bit about Gov. Walz’s decision. Here’s part of Rep. Franson’s e-letter update:

Dear Neighbors,

This week, the governor extended the Stay at Home order for several more weeks, until May 4th. I have heard from many of you whose lives have been turned upside-down by all this, and I want you to know that legislators have been pushing Governor Walz’s administration on a daily basis, asking for exemptions, flexibility, and common sense. If a business can safely operate, while protecting the health of its employees and customers, they should be allowed to do so.

I am extremely frustrated that Gov. Walz has so far decided against sharing the modeling data that he is basing his decisions on. Minnesotans want to work together to keep their neighbors safe, but they also deserve transparency in the decision-making process. If this administration is going to continue affecting the lives of every Minnesotan with these sweeping orders, they deserve to know what information those decisions are based on.

First, Rep. Franson is right in saying that Gov. Walz should share with the legislature the model’s assumptions. Next, Rep. Franson is right in insisting that Gov. Walz’s plan be based on flexibility and common sense. Thus far, the DFL plan has lacked those traits.

I can believe that it’s highly frustrating for Rep. Franson and other Republicans because Gov. Walz and the DFL, who ran on the issue of transparency during budget negotiations, has been as transparent as a rock. Further, Gov. Walz’s has acted like an autocrat. He hasn’t talked with legislative leaders about what he’s about to do. The DFL hasn’t shown an interest in discussing what’s needed for Minnesota’s health.

Considering those things, it isn’t surprising that Minnesotans (statewide) are turning on Gov. Walz’s autocratic rule. Rep. Franson isn’t the only Republican who isn’t thrilled with Gov. Walz’s decision-making:

“I do not approve of the Governor’s unilateral decision to continue the order to shelter at home until May 4th,” Senate Majority Leader Paul Gazelka tweeted Thursday. “We have to get on with our lives.”

Gov. Walz is a cold-hearted jackass. Check this out:

“My heart breaks for the people who are worried for their economic well-being, but you can’t get frustrated, go on a hunch and throw caution to the wind and pretend like our neighbors’ lives are somehow disposable,” Walz said.

Walz and the DFL have done nothing except play hunches. The experts’ initial projection was 74,000 Minnesotans dying from COVID-19. At the time I write this, that projection is just off by 73,950+. In other words, I could’ve done better throwing darts at a dartboard. Assuming that shelter-in-place is the only option for staying safe is stupid. Here’s what Gov. Walz is thinking:


Seriously? Gov. Walz is expecting 5,000 people in ICUs this June? What type of idiot thinks that? That’s frightening on a Biden level. How does Gov. Walz defend his statement, considering Sen. Gazelka’s information. Finally, there’s this:

Within the DFL, it’s apparent that common sense is common. There’s definitely a shortage.

Bit-by-bit, people are putting a higher priority on teaching old-fashioned civics. About five years ago, “a coalition of prominent leaders assembled by the Arizona-based Joe Foss Institute launched a Civics Education Initiative.” They started with the premise that students shouldn’t graduate unless they pass the same test that immigrants must pass when they apply for citizenship.

This movement started after it was discovered that “fewer than half knew that John Roberts is the current chief justice of the United States. More than one-quarter thought Brett Kavanaugh was.” When students were asked the term length for U.S. senators and representatives, “fewer than half of college graduates could give the correct numbers.”

While this is disturbing information, there’s more frightening news lurking on the horizon:

As Education Week has reported, the very idea of schools using the citizenship test elicits a “torrent of criticism from leaders who favor the new, broader conception of civics education.” Jessica Marshall, former social studies director for Chicago schools, put it this way: “[The citizenship tests] don’t tell us if young people know how to mobilize their communities to get resources or pass laws they care about.”

It isn’t the job of schools to teach students how to be progressive activists. Back in September, I wrote about Rep. Dean Urdahl’s op-ed (Part I and Part II). In that op-ed, Rep. Urdahl wrote this:

Next session, the MSBA [Minnesota School Board Association] plans to double down on its campaign against civic education. MSBA officials want to no longer have to offer the civics test. This crosses the line from passivity to enmity regarding civics. Testing conveys a message; we care about what we test. Eliminating the test implies MSBA doesn’t think civics is important. In Minnesota, it should not be about the number of tests, but rather, are we testing the right things.

Rep. Urdahl also wrote this:

The failure is measurable. The National Assessment of Educational Progress, the highly respected “Nation’s Report Card,” reports that 75% of our graduates leave high school not proficient in civics. They are failing. A nationwide poll found that two-thirds of Americans can name an American Idol judge, but only 15% can name the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. One-third of our graduates can’t name a single branch of our government. The Annenberg Study revealed that 37% cannot name one right guaranteed in the First Amendment. There are students who think Judge Judy is on the Supreme Court.

Rep. Urdahl also wrote that MSBA wants school boards, not voters, to have the final say on operating levies:

Over 332 school boards are elected by their communities. These members are trusted and charged with the governance of school property, budget, curriculum, technology, taxes, student achievement and teacher quality – ensuring excellence and equity in all public schools. Therefore, MSBA asks that you honor and trust the work of these local officials by allowing school boards to renew an existing operating referendum, by reducing the current number of mandates, and provide flexibility to meet the unique needs of their schools and communities.

TRANSLATION: Those pesky citizens shouldn’t have a say on their property taxes. We know what’s best. That’s what progressive arrogance sounds like.

Since the DFL controls the House in 2020, it isn’t likely that they’ll say no to MSBA. That means we’ll need the GOP Senate to stop this unaccountability initiative dead in its tracks. Trusting school boards to do the right thing is like giving matches to an arsonist, then expecting him to not set something on fire. That isn’t insanity. It’s stupidity.

It’s also imperative that we elect a GOP majority in the House and maintain the GOP majority in the Senate in 2020. We can’t afford unified DFL state government. We saw what a disaster that was in 2013-14.

These things should be taught until students understand why we adopted this Constitution and why the US is the greatest nation on earth. We should make it illegal to teach political activism in schools. That’s the job of political parties and outside groups. Taxpayers shouldn’t be paying for that stuff.

In addition to emphasizing teaching civics, it’s essential to emphasize teaching history, math and science, too. It’s important to de-emphasize the victimology classes, too. Civics classes unite us as a nation. Victimology classes divide us. Let’s work to unite, not divide, this great nation.

These negotiations (which I wrote about here) produced some of the biggest winners and losers in recent history. Let’s start with the biggest losers.

It’s impossible to imagine a bigger loser than Tim Walz. He lost on his tax increases, including the gas tax, the sick tax and the income tax increases. He and the DFL lost on spending, too. Another major loser was DFL Speaker Melissa Hortman. She was present throughout the negotiations but didn’t seem to be an active participant in those negotiations. I’d give her a ‘Potted Plant Award’ for participation.

Another major loser throughout the negotiations was DFL House Majority Leader Ryan Winkler. Friday night on Almanac, his first time on the big stage, DFL Rep. Winkler was used like a whipping post, first by Sen. Roger Chamberlain, then by House Minority leader Kurt Daudt. (More on them later.)

The other major loser in these negotiations was Education Minnesota, the people most famous for owning the DFL:

The biggest winners in this negotiations are Minnesota’s taxpayers. They didn’t get hit with one of the biggest tax increases in Minnesota history. That alone makes them a big winner.

The next biggest winner was Roger Chamberlain. Throughout these negotiations, he fought for the taxpayers, reminding the politicians who they worked for, aka the people. He took Rep. Winkler to the proverbial wood shed multiple times. After Rep. Winkler spurted out that “there are no free lunches”, Sen. Chamberlain reminded Rep. Winkler that the people not represented at the Capitol were “the people who pay the bills”, aka the taxpayers.

It’s hard to see how Kurt Daudt, the former and hopefully future GOP Speaker of the House, could’ve been more effective. He stated emphatically on Almanac that the DFL could raise spending by 7.3% without raising taxes a penny. That statement might’ve done more to finish the talks than anything else.

I’d be remiss if I didn’t praise Senate Majority Leader Gazelka for his job in negotiating this budget. Let’s remember that he won a significant tax cut by getting the 7.05% rate dropped to 6.8%. Rest assured that the DFL didn’t fight to include that policy change in the budget agreement.

Finally, I’d have to apologize if I didn’t include the House DFL legislators. They all voted for the Walz/DFL tax increases, which will hurt them in 2020, then saw Gov. Walz throw them under the proverbial bus in final negotiations. I can’t imagine them being too happy with Gov. Walz and the DFL leadership for that ‘favor’. That makes the DFL, especially the DFL House majority, a major loser in these negotiations.

From where I’m sitting, it’s pretty clear that the DFL got smoked in this year’s budget negotiations. First, the DFL didn’t get its 20-cent-a-gallon gas tax increase. Next, the DFL didn’t get its $12,000,000,000 overall tax increase. Third, the DFL had to settle for a cut in the HCAF, aka Sick Tax, rate. Included in this agreement is a drop from 2% to 1.8% on the Sick Tax rate. Further, the final budget will spend approximately $48,000,000,000 instead of the $51,000,000,000 that Gov. Walz and the DFL wanted.

Finally and perhaps most surprising of all, Gov. Walz and the DFL got talked into dropping the middle class tax rate from 7.05% to 6.8%. I’m betting that the DFL didn’t push that during negotiations. I’m betting that Sen. Gazelka pushed that tax cut.

Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz and legislative leaders announced a state budget agreement at a Capitol news conference Sunday night. “This is a budget that invests in education, health care and community prosperity in a fiscally responsible manner,” Walz said just after 6:30 p.m. Sunday, joined by Republican Senate Majority Leader Paul Gazelka and Democratic House Speaker Melissa Hortman at a Capitol news conference. “Today we proved that divided government can work for the betterment of the people we serve.”

Significantly, the deal does not include an increase in the state’s gas tax. The total budget will be a little over $48 billion. Other provisions of the deal include:

  1. a 2 percent increase each year of the biennium for the E-12 education funding formula
  2. an income tax rate cut in the second bracket
  3. continuation of the medical provider tax at 1.8 percent instead of 2 percent
  4. $500 million in bonding, with a large portion of that going to housing projects

I found this part of MPR’s article interesting:

The Senate on Saturday approved a Republican plan for preventing a state government shutdown if a stalemate persists, throwing down a challenge to House Democrats and Walz to either agree or take the blame for a shutdown when the current budget expires June 30. But Democrats had little to gain by taking a vote on the “lights on” proposal, given that Republicans would then have few incentives to keep negotiating.

The bill would fund government for up to two years at current projected levels assuming autopilot growth in the budget of about $1.9 billion. It just happens to be close to the Senate GOP’s original budget proposal, with none of the tax increases sought by Walz and House Democrats to put more into education, health care, transportation and other programs.

Democratic House Minority Leader Tom Bakk dismissed the gambit as throwing in the towel and accused Republicans of bargaining in bad faith.

Isn’t it interesting that, hours after Sen. Bakk “accused Republicans of bargaining in bad faith”, a budget deal was reached? I’d say that Sen. Bakk’s statement looks rather foolish at this point. Perhaps, Sen. Bakk felt stung by the fact that he wasn’t an integral part of these negotiations. Notice who isn’t part of this picture:

Whichever way you slice it, Gov. Walz and the DFL got smoked in his first negotiations.

Based on Briana Bierschbach’s article, there’s 4 things hanging up a budget agreement. Here are the 4 items:

1) Provider tax
2) Gas tax
3) Other tax increases
4) Spending

What it really comes down to is the DFL wants to spend Minnesota into oblivion. We’re already running a surplus because we’re taxed too much. That expected surplus is already being revised upward. There’s a ton of money flowing into Minnesota’s coffers. Tim Walz and the DFL want to raise taxes even higher and spend money at an unsustainable rate.

Gazelka, R-Nisswa, said there are several pots of money that already exist in the state to spend more on education and public safety, including the state’s $1 billion budget surplus, as well as the more than $2 billion in state budget reserves, which were recently fed even more when revenue collections came in nearly $500 million higher than expected last month. “We can get to places of compromise that still do not need any tax increases to work,” Gazelka said.

Republicans need to say no to the DFL’s tax increases and spending increases, starting with the HCAF tax increase. (HCAF = the Health Care Access Fund.) HCAF funds some subsidized health insurance programs but it frequently gets raided, too. A loyal reader of LFR contacted me and told me that monies have been shifted out of HCAF and into the general fund, where it can be used for who knows what.

Further, I read a recent commentary that says that 77% of the money in HCAF gets moved into the general fund as a sort of “slush fund” to pay off the DFL’s special interest allies. In other words, they could cut the HCAF tax substantially and still have enough money to fund the programs they currently want to fund. That’s before we talk about the gas tax increase, which is obscene, and the other tax increases. Let’s put it this way:

  1. we’re already running a surplus
  2. revenues are coming in faster than predicted
  3. Minnesota’s Rainy Day Fund has $2,523,000,000 in it, the largest in state history
  4. Despite all this, the DFL wants to increase taxes by another $12,000,000,000 over the next 4 years.

What types of drugs are the DFL using? Perhaps the DFL has gotten ahold of the newly legalized magic mushrooms and are using them. This isn’t insane. It’s galaxies beyond insane.

Tim Walz and the DFL continue insisting upon a budget that’s best described as insane, stupid or counterproductive. The DFL’s goal, apparently, is to make Minnesota uncompetitive with other states. We’re already the highest-taxed state according to Kiplinger’s. That isn’t good enough for Tim Walz and the DFL, though. They’re pushing a $12,000,000,000 tax increase over the next 4 years.

What’s worse is that it hits the lowest incomes the hardest. That isn’t just my opinion. That’s the official summary of Gov. Walz’s Department of Revenue’s Tax Incidence Report! The latest word is that Walz and the DFL have ‘offered’ a 16-cent-a-gallon gas tax instead of a 20-cent-a-gallon gas tax. WOW! How generous. Walz and the DFL have also offered to trim $300,000,000 of spending from a $51,000,000,000 biennial budget.

If Walz and the DFL want to run on that in 2020, bring it on. That’ll be as popular as a Packer fanatic at a Vikings game. Good luck with that.

Thanks to the DFL, we’ll soon have 4 of the last 5 budget sessions ending with either a government shutdown or a contentious special session. In other words, the DFL has made governing dysfunctional again. No wonder why wealth keeps fleeing the state.

The first 6 seconds of this video of the Republicans’ press availability last night shows how determined the DFL is to overtax Minnesotans:

For instance, the budget surplus from the November forecast is over $1,000,000,000. Additionally, the year-to-date additional surplus is $573,000,000, which is 3.1% above forecast, including $489,000,000 in unexpected revenues in April, 2019. That’s before factoring in $2,523,000,000 in Minnesota’s Rainy Day Fund. That’s a record amount in the Rainy Day Fund, BTW.

What’s obscene about that is that that’s money stolen from Minnesotans who would otherwise use that money to create jobs. Instead, the DFL has confiscated that wealth to protect government. That’s how not to govern.

Republicans should stand their ground. Period. This isn’t just a budget fight. It’s a fight to restore sanity to the budget. At no point has the DFL offered reforms to fix the problems that’ve been identified by various OLA audit reports.

In summary, the DFL is gaining the reputation of spending recklessly and ignoring existing problems. Let’s see them run on that in 2020.

It’s insulting to hear DFL legislators and Democrat Gov. Tim Walz complain that Republicans hadn’t moved from their position of being unwilling to raise Minnesota’s taxpayers burden by $12,000,000,000 over the next 4 years. According to this AP article, the DFL expected GOP lawmakers to accept that $12,000,000,000 tax increase in exchange for the DFL cutting $332,000,000 out of the DFL’s $50,000,000,000 budget.

That isn’t a compromise. That’s a total capitulation if it happened. Thankfully, it won’t happen. That’s because the GOP majority in the Senate won’t budge on these (or any other) tax increases.

Minnesota’s tax and regulatory system has already made it one of the least competitive states in the US. According to Walz’s own Department of Revenue report, the Walz-DFL monster tax increases promise to hit lower income taxpayers the hardest:

The tax plan proposed by Gov. Tim Walz would hit lower income Minnesotans harder than wealthier earners. That’s the outcome of analysis by the Democratic governor’s own Department of Revenue, which carried out a tax incidence analysis of Walz’s plan, which includes, among other things, a reduction in state income taxes but increases in business, estate, gas and vehicle sales tax, among other changes.

According to the revenue department, the overall tax burden on Minnesotans would increase from 11.63 percent currently to 12.39 percent under Walz’s plan, an increase of 0.76 percent. However it’s the lowest earners who would see a bigger increase in their taxes.

The so-called Party of the Little Guy wants to soak the little guy? That fits the DFL’s identity since the DFL seems to think that President Trump’s broad-based recovery is only being felt by millionaires and billionaires, not the blue collar workers that’ve experienced a 4.5% growth in wages compared with the 1% seeing a 3% increase in wages:

The governor said in an interview on Minnesota Public Radio that his budget was based on what the state needs to spend to maintain quality education and other programs at a time when the state’s population is growing, and that he’d like to see some reciprocity from Republicans.

That’s BS! Minnesota doesn’t need to become less competitive taxwise. Republicans’ campaign slogan should be ‘Make Minnesota competitive again.’ There isn’t a polite way to put this so I’ll just say it. Tim Walz and Melissa Hortman are economic illiterates. Walz was a nobody in Washington, DC. Hortman’s list of accomplishments is shorter than Barack Obama’s.

If the DFL keeps insisting on their massive tax increases, Hortman will be a 1-term speaker and Republicans will gain seats in the Senate, too. These tax increases are, to put it politely, counterproductive. The DFL should be sued for economic malpractice.