Archive for the ‘Elizabeth Warren’ Category

Multiple times in the past year, Democrats have threatened to change the composition of the Supreme Court because Republicans confirmed Constitution-loving justices. It isn’t a secret that Democrats prefer outcome-based justices. During John Roberts’ confirmation hearing, Sen. Durbin asked a question about what assurances the American people would have that Roberts would rule in the little guy’s favor. Roberts replied, saying that he’d guarantee that he’d rule in the little guy’s favor every time the Constitution was on the little guy’s side.

The Constitution isn’t meant to give “the little guy” an advantage. That’s what legislatures are for. In this post, I wrote about a brief that the Democrat senators Whitehouse, Rosenthal, Hirono and Durbin sent to the Supreme Court. In that brief, they wrote “The Supreme Court is not well. And the people know it. Perhaps the Court can heal itself before the public demands it be ‘restructured in order to reduce the influence of politics.’ Particularly on the urgent issue of gun control, a nation desperately needs it to heal.”

This was clearly a threat from the Democrats to pack the Supreme Court with additional justices if Democrats didn’t get the outcome they wanted on a gun control lawsuit. Democrats haven’t been bashful about their desire to pack the courts. This article highlights the Democrats’ politicization of the Supreme Court:

Democratic candidates are increasingly advocating “court packing,” that is, upping the number of Supreme Court justices to balance the bench — or ensure a liberal majority. The idea is unlikely to succeed for historical and practical reasons but its resonance on the campaign trail reflects Democrats’ new emphasis on the judiciary during the Trump era.

While the Supreme Court is established by the Constitution, the number of members of the Supreme Court is dictated by the Legislative Branch. In other words, a simple majority of Democrats in the House, a simple majority of Democrats in the Senate and a signature of a Democrat president could pack the Supreme Court for a generation or more.

It’s time to take that matter out of the hands of partisans. It’s time to pass a constitutional amendment that forever establishes a 9-member Supreme Court. That’s what we have now. The Court works just fine. Let’s see how many Democrats vote against such an amendment. I triple-dog dare Democrats to admit that they favor the full politicization of the Supreme Court. This is a campaign ad from Elizabeth Warren’s senate campaign:

There’s no way she wouldn’t pack the courts to tip the Supreme Court in the Democrats’ favor.

It’s been confirmed that Sen. Amy Klobuchar has suspended her campaign to become the Democrats’ presidential nominee in 2020. It’s further been confirmed that she’s flying to Dallas to endorse Joe Biden at a rally tonight.

This weekend, the Democrats’ field has narrowed substantially. Saturday night, billionaire Tom Steyer dropped out. Yesterday, Pete Buttigieg dropped out. Today, Amy Klobuchar dropped out. Thus far, she’s the only Democrat presidential candidate to endorse another candidate. Meanwhile, Elizabeth Warren has said that she’s in it for the long haul.

The new Klobuchar-Biden alliance is a big deal from the perspective that she’s one of the most-respected so-called moderates in the race. She showed herself, for the most part, to be a capable debater. By endorsing Biden tonight in Texas, she’s giving VP Biden a boost in a state where polls show him within striking distance of Sen. Sanders. It’s an open question whether the endorsement will help at this late date but it’s worth finding out.

This is the right move for Sen. Klobuchar at this point. It’s been apparent since before the Nevada Caucuses that her campaign wasn’t competitive after her surprising third-place finish in New Hampshire. She finished a distant sixth in Nevada. She followed that up with a distant fifth place finish in South Carolina with just 3.16% of the vote in South Carolina and 4.2% of the vote in Nevada.

UPDATE: Pete Buttigieg will join Sen. Klobuchar at Vice President Biden’s rally tonight. Both former rivals will endorse Joe Biden tonight:

Former Vice President Joe Biden’s Democratic presidential bid picked up steam on Monday as he was set to pick up the endorsements of two former 2020 rivals – Amy Klobuchar and Pete Buttigieg – on the eve of the crucial Super Tuesday primary elections.

While Joe Biden will win South Carolina’s First-in-the-South Primary, things look bleak for him after that. Things look worse for Mini-Mike and Elizabeth Warren. That’s because Berniementum is gaining strength. Bernie leads by a wide margin in California, leads comfortably in Texas and leads narrowly in Elizabeth Warren’s home state of Massachusetts.

The key word in that paragraph is leads. If Bernie gets three-fourths of California’s 415 delegates, he’ll become the odds-on-favorite to win the nomination. If he wins with a solid margin in Texas, that strengthens his position. Defeating Elizabeth Warren and Amy Klobuchar in their home states, which seems likely at this point, would virtually eliminate their path to the nomination. Think of it like Hillary after the networks called Wisconsin for President Trump. At that point, pundits started talking about Hillary’s path to victory after spending most of the night wondering what Trump’s path to victory would look like. Check out this polling from RCP’s page:

After Bernie wraps up the nomination, expect President Trump to hit him with a barrage of ads from which Bernie will never recover from. Make no mistake about this. Bernie is a dead man walking. Check this out:

The Nevada Caucus has come and gone, but the debate leading to it had some rather worrisome tidbits if you’re a worker in the Rust Belt. The Democrats just hate you. That’s all we can gather from their agenda, especially Sen. Bernie Sanders.

If he isn’t bellowing about health care, it’s climate change. We’re less than a decade away from all of us dying from global warming, according to the Vermont senator. So, that means we have to act now. Not tomorrow, not after breakfast—now! We’re all going to die…unless we do exactly what the Democrats want on this issue, which is typical. And in doing so, Sanders, like his former rival Hillary Clinton, may have had his own coal miner moment. You might remember from 2016 that the former first lady and two-time presidential loser promised to put a lot of coal miners out of business if elected president.

Bernie must win back Hillary’s ‘blue firewall’ states of Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Michigan while holding onto the states that Hillary won. Winning back Pennsylvania and Michigan while losing Wisconsin puts Trump right at 270 electoral votes. Killing fracking and mining kills those states’ economies, which means Bernie loses those states and his shot at the White House.

There’s no question whether President Trump will hit Bernie on this issue. In 2016, he told those voters that he considered them the forgotten men but that he’d promise to never forget them while he was president. President Trump has kept that promise.

People wonder what happens if the Coronavirus will hurt President Trump. It might if they don’t handle things properly. If the NIH and CDC respond quickly and the various agencies handle things properly, then people will realize that this was just something that was beyond President Trump’s ability to control. If President Trump and VP Pence make the right decisions administratively, they’ll benefit from those right decisions.

It isn’t like people will suddenly say ‘I’m abandoning President Trump’s policies. He’s just too prosperous.’

Money won’t erase the memory of Mini Mike’s evasive answer when Elizabeth Warren prosecuted Mini Mike about lawsuits. CNN pundit Van Jones said that Bloomberg looked like the Titanic while Sen. Warren looked like the iceberg. That sums it up pretty nicely. Watch this and decide for yourself:

Obviously, this was a great moment for Sen. Elizabeth Warren. This was likely Sen. Warren’s finest debate performance. Bloomberg’s reply was entirely defensive and evasive. While Sen. Warren demanded specifics, Bloomberg spoke about statistics and awards that his organization had won.

The question that remains is whether this temporarily hurts Bloomberg or whether it sinks his ship. Will he organize a press conference and surround himself with women as character witnesses? Or will voters agree with Sen. Warren that voting for Bloomberg is voting for an out-of-touch billionaire? I suspect that we won’t know the answer to that until Super Tuesday.

Considering the fact that the Democrats’ establishment is frightened to death of Bernie, another thing to watch is whether the Democrats’ establishment will try to resuscitate Bloomberg’s campaign. Prior to last night’s debate, Bloomberg had moved up in the polls by running a pretty decent campaign. The campaign got high marks for their commercials.

Then came last night. No amount of slick ads can eliminate last night’s performance. Further, Bloomberg had gotten hit with one opposition research dump after another that made him look elitist and out-of-touch. His demeaning talk about farmers was particularly disgusting, especially after watching Paul Harvey’s ‘So God made a farmer”:

The farmer in Paul Harvey’s story is strong, virtuous, compassionate, hard-working and the type of man that others look up to. Mini Mike is none of those things. He’s an elitist city slicker who’s hiding something.

To say that Wednesday night went perfectly for President Trump is epic understatement. During his Phoenix rally, President Trump gave the jam-packed arena audience an update on the Democrats’ presidential debate being held in Las Vegas. When he spoke about the Democrats’ presidential debate, Trump said “Now they have a new member of the crew, Mini Mike. No Boxes, we call him No Boxes. I hear he’s getting pounded tonight. I hear they’re pounding him. I think he spent all this money, he has maybe 15 points. Hey, fake news, how many points does he have? They won’t tell you the truth.”

Yes, Mini Mike got pounded Wednesday night. Elizabeth Warren had her best performance by starting strong with this shot:

Wow! Bloomberg looked flummoxed, pissed and uncertain. His face was frozen. (He needs to work on his poker face.) He wasn’t happy being the center of attention. Most importantly, gone was Bloomberg’s TV ad persona. It’s easy to look polished when you aren’t facing live bullets. It’s another thing to look polished when there’s live ammunition coming at you starting in the first minute.

Meanwhile in Phoenix, President Trump had a triumphant rally. He brought the Arizona congressional delegation onto stage. Included in the delegation was Gov. Doug Ducey. Minutes later, President Trump brought up “special guest” Sen. Martha McSally. First, President Trump gave McSally his full endorsement. Then he asked her to speak:

McSally got the crowd on their feet when she said that Mark Kelly “finally admitted” that he’d support Bernie Sanders if he was the Democrats’ nominee. She also ripped into Kelly for his gun-grabbing agenda. It’s difficult to picture Arizonans picking a gun-grabbing socialist over a tax-cutting capitalist who voted to acquit President Trump.

According to this article, Elizabeth Warren was Wednesday’s winner, mostly at Bloomberg’s expense:

Winner: Elizabeth Warren
The Massachusetts senator had performed poorly in the first two primary contests, declined in the national polls, and faded into the background in the past few debates. It looked like her campaign was on death’s door.

It seems like Warren needs a miracle to save her campaign, and while strong debate performances haven’t always translated into good polling in the past, Wednesday night was still one hell of a start. Warren dominated the stage, delivering striking answers in one of the best performances I’ve seen from a presidential candidate — not just in this cycle, but ever.

Then there’s this:

Loser: Mike Bloomberg
Up until Wednesday, Bloomberg’s campaign had been a grand experiment. It eschewed the typical marks of a political campaign — public events, speeches, actual interactions with voters — in favor of an unprecedented ad blitz funded by the former mayor’s seemingly unlimited personal fortune. Bloomberg has spent more than $400 million of his own money on political ads. As my Vox colleague Ezra Klein noted, “if you ignore Tom Steyer, the other self-funding billionaire chasing the Democratic nomination, Bloomberg has spent more than three times as much as all the other Democratic candidates combined.”

President Trump must’ve been smiling Wednesday night. Not only did Trump have fun at the rally but he got great news from the Democrats’ debate.

Bernie Sanders’ Democrat presidential campaign just won a major endorsement ahead of the Nevada Caucus, the South Carolina Primary and Super Tuesday’s slate of events. According to the article, “Mijente, a grass-roots organization that mobilizes Latinx and Chicanx voters, decided to make its first-ever presidential endorsement in response to President Donald Trump’s rhetoric and policies targeting Latinos. The endorsement adds to the growing collection of progressive groups coalescing around the Vermont senator, after earlier expectations they would be divided between him and Elizabeth Warren.”

Politico reports that “Marisa Franco, director and cofounder of Mijente, said the group’s members picked Sanders after a lengthy process that included sit-downs with multiple candidates. In January, its members voted on four options: endorsing Sanders, Warren, both of them, or no endorsement at all. In the end, 70 percent of its members voted to endorse Sanders.

This isn’t insignificant. It’s big news right before the Nevada Caucuses, where Hispanics comprise a significant portion of the voters. If Bernie does well with Hispanics in Nevada, that gives him momentum with that bloc of voters going into Super Tuesday. The biggest prizes on Super Tuesday are California, with 416 delegates, Texas, with 228 delegates, and Florida, with 219 delegates:

Super Tuesday might be a major determining factor for the Democrat nomination, with a total of 1,345 delegates to the Democrat National Convention being up for grabs that night. Democrats require 1,991 delegates to win their nomination.

If Bernie wins Nevada, that means he will have won the popular vote in Iowa, New Hampshire and Nevada. With that type of momentum from the first 3 states, the rest of the states set up nicely for Sen. Sanders. The other thing that’s helping Bernie is the fact that he’s got enough cash to compete with Bloomberg. He can’t match Bloomberg dollar-for-dollar but he doesn’t need to. After all of the opposition research that’s come out against Bloomberg in the past week, Bernie is in a strong position to capitalize on the situation.

Tonight’s debate will play a larger-than-usual role in shaping the race. It wouldn’t surprise me if Bernie captures a strong victory in Nevada on Saturday. It isn’t the delegates that are most important; it’s about maintaining the momentum. If Bernie wins and Buttigieg finishes second, that essentially eliminates the Biden, Warren and Klobuchar campaigns.

It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that the Democrats’ presidential candidates are competing with each other in their race to Battleground State irrelevancy. Whether it’s Bernie Sanders, Amy Klobuchar, Joe Biden or Elizabeth Warren wanting to kill fossil fuels, or Mike Bloomberg insisting that farming is simple, city slicker Democrats apparently think that they can win the White House without winning midwestern battleground states.

While this won’t hurt Democrats with primary voters, it’ll sting the Democrats’ nominee in the general election, especially if Mike Bloomberg is the nominee. Picture the reaction Bloomberg would get across the Midwest when this video goes viral:


This is Bloomberg’s ‘Basket of Deplorables’ moment. That video can be deployed in multiple settings. First, it can be used to show he’s simply hostile to farmers. Next, it can be used to show that he really isn’t interested in uniting the country. Third, it can be used to ask how many other things he’ll have to apologize for. He’s already apologized for Stop-Question-and-Frisk.

The truth is that Mr. Bloomberg has said some rather heartless things. When he talked about throwing minorities up against the wall, he was either in his late 60s or early 70s. Shouldn’t he have known the ramifications of his statements? It isn’t like he was a reckless teenager when he said that.

Sen. Warren’s policies aren’t that appealing and she lies about virtually everything. At a time when people crave authenticity, she’s a phony. This weekend, Amy Klobuchar started flip-flopping while pandering for vote. How will that work? Joe Biden has been disparaging people while calling them disgusting names. He’s told them to vote for other candidates, too. Based on Iowa and New Hampshire, they’ve taken his instructions to heart.

Then there’s Bernie. He wants to eliminate private health care at a time when Democrats can’t even do simple math at their caucuses. Democrats still haven’t finished recanvassing the Iowa Caucuses results, which was 2 weeks ago. They want us to think that they’re proficient at figuring out complexities in the health care laws? I don’t think so.

Bernie will have difficulty defending President Trump’s attacks. Bernie wants to keep his money but he wants other millionaires to pay their fair share. Bernie’s policies will cripple this booming economy. How popular will that be with voters? Hint: The answer to that question rhymes with ‘it won’t.’

Finally, there’s some results from Iowa. Whether they’re accurate is still in question. Last night, when it became clear that the Iowa Democratic Party’s app wouldn’t work, the Klobuchar, Biden, Buttigieg, Warren and Yang campaigns delivered rah-rah speeches to fire up their supporters even though they didn’t have any results.

Later, the Sanders campaign “took it on itself to release numbers it collected from nearly 40 percent of precincts, tabulated by its campaign organizers. The Sanders campaign reports it received 29.7 percent of the vote, closely followed by former South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg at 24.6 percent. Sen. Elizabeth Warren came in at 21.2 percent, and former Vice President Joe Biden in fourth at 12.4 percent. Sanders put those numbers out shortly after Buttigieg finished his own, seemingly triumphant speech in Iowa. The party said it would release official results Tuesday.”

Relying on a campaign’s campaign figures isn’t the smartest thing. Campaigns have been known to cherry-pick information that most favors them and omit the information that isn’t flattering to them. Still, it’s the closest thing to actual data that we’ve seen thus far.

If Sanders’ numbers are relatively accurate, Biden and Klobuchar have a reason to worry. Biden had Iowa to himself, with the exception of Buttigieg. If he had a real message, he would’ve put the state away and coasted to victory. He didn’t win with 12.4% of the vote. It was smart for Sen. Klobuchar to make her speech but reality will catch up if she doesn’t get a message fast.

This morning, President Trump weighed in via twitter:


This tweet looks totally foolish at this point:


No results 14 hours after the Caucuses started is transparency? Who knew that they’d lowered the bar that far? Is that like invisible transparency?

Years ago, Minnesotans got quite a chuckle at the expense of Iowans. The joke was that Iowa wasn’t name but an acronym. The joke was that Iowa was an acronym that stood for “I Owe the World an Apology.” Last night, the first in the nation caucus did something that no other political party had done before. Iowa held a caucus, then didn’t report the results.

Each of the top Democrats delivered a quasi-victory speech, with Minnesota Democrat Amy Klobuchar being the first Democrat to sound upbeat without having anything except anecdotal evidence on the results. Klobuchar was followed by Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren, Pete Buttigieg and Andrew Yang. It was thought that Sanders, Buttigieg and Warren (not necessarily in that order) were the top 3, with Biden “finishing a distant 4th.” If that’s true, and we don’t know that it is, Klobuchar will have survived because the Democratic Party of Iowa was too incompetent to count votes.

CNN is reporting that “Iowa Democratic Party Chair Troy Price faced intense criticism from multiple Democratic campaigns during a call early on Tuesday morning, with senior advisers repeatedly questioning the transparency of the process.”

Price continued:

Price sought to defend the process, arguing that the delay in reporting results stemmed from the party’s desire to “ensure the integrity of the process” but that the party was working to keep “campaigns in the loop throughout this entire process.”

Guy Benson tweeted this incomplete data from the Sanders campaign:


It isn’t Guy’s fault that he didn’t have complete numbers. That fault lies 100% on the Democratic Party of Iowa. Mark Meadows’ tweet:


What could possibly go wrong?

When it was first reported that the final CNN-Des Moines Register poll before the caucuses wouldn’t be published, the Des Moines Register issued this explanation on why it wouldn’t be published:

The Des Moines Register, CNN and Selzer & Co. have made the decision to not release the final installment of the CNN/Des Moines Register/Mediacom poll as planned Saturday evening. Nothing is more important to the Register and its polling partners than the integrity of the Iowa Poll. Today, a respondent raised an issue with the way the survey was administered, which could have compromised the results of the poll. It appears a candidate’s name was omitted in at least one interview in which the respondent was asked to name their preferred candidate.

Jazz Shaw’s article asks some important questions that stop well short of conspiracy theories:

How big would the impact have been on the final results? The sample size for the last Des Moines Register Iowa poll was 701 likely caucus-goers. Let’s say there were ten people making the calls. If one person’s font size was off, there might have been roughly 70 calls where a name was left off the list of choices. But they randomize the order of the names, so all the candidates would have missed being listed, likely less than a dozen times each. Wouldn’t that randomization balance out?

I’m not a statistician but couldn’t this be fixed by weighting the results differently? To the statisticians reading this, feel free to offer insights into this question in the comments section.

UPDATE: Powerline has an update on this story that’s worth checking out:


I won’t say that I’ll trust this information. I’ll just offer this opinion: if it’s true, then the Klobuchar campaign ends in Iowa.

The other thing worth noting is that the DMR poll is the gold standard in Iowa polling, much like the Marquette Law School poll is the gold standard in Wisconsin. We’ll still have to wait on the results but the DMR poll is usually accurate.