Archive for the ‘Accountability’ Category

There’s a good chance that this will replace the current Minneapolis Police Department, aka MPD, when the DFL City Council dismantles the MPD. According to the article, “If anyone is put in physical danger, they instead vowed to seek help from the American Indian Movement, which was founded in Minneapolis in 1968 to address systemic issues of poverty and police brutality against Native Americans and has been policing their own communities for years.”

Earlier in the article, readers find out that “traffic has reportedly increased in the neighborhood around Powderhorn Park, as drug dealers seek to meet their clientele displaced during the civil unrest, rioting and looting following Floyd’s death at the end of May. At least one person overdosed inside the park and was brought out by an ambulance. Prostitution has also been reported in the area.” Then there’s this:

A progressive Minneapolis neighborhood that pledged not to call the police in the wake of the death of George Floyd is now dealing with a 300-strong homeless encampment in a local park, according to reports.

Thank God that this neighborhood checked their white privilege instead of calling 9-1-1. I’m betting that’s making life easier for the drug dealers. That’s probably high on this neighborhood’s priority list. This is what it’s come to:

According to this segment on KARE11 News, the community organizers demand the city present a plan to help with the homeless problem. The neighborhood invited them into the park. The neighborhood’s invitation makes it the neighborhood’s problem. Frankly, I’d tell them to take a hike.

This is what happens when pacifists and appeasers run a city:

Residents in the neighborhood historically known for its far-left politics and activism intervened last week when park police gave campers 72 hours to dismantle their tents and leave. The Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board has since passed a resolution not to evict people from any city park and has called for increased funding for longer-term housing for campers, according to the Star Tribune.

“We are not going to kick the can down the road, push people out of public spaces when they have nowhere else to go,” Park Board President Jono Cowgill told the Tribune. “This is not a sustainable, dignified solution for folks who are experiencing homelessness right now, and the state needs to step up.

The state better not step up with funding. Minneapolis created this crisis with its irresponsible policy-making. That’s their problem. It’s one thing to say that the entire state should pay to fix MNLARS. That program serves the entire state. It’s another thing when Minneapolis makes a stupid mistake that affects only them.

Minneapolis created the problem by inviting these vagrants into this park. Then they said that they wouldn’t protect their citizens because they were checking their white privilege at the edge of the park. That’s their right. It’s their city. If they want state money to pay for this problem, then rural taxpayers should get a say in setting Minneapolis’s policies. If Minneapolis Democrats want the money, just not the lecture, that’s fine. They just shouldn’t get the money in that scenario.

PS- Good luck to the Minneapolis DFL. If they’re relying on AIM to protect them, they’d better buy lots of guns.

This past weekend, the DFL House passed a bill that would force Minnesotans to pay for the bills that DFL Mayor Jacob Frey caused. According to the Alpha News article, “The Democrat-controlled state house voted 74-53, Friday, in affirmation of a bill (HR 132/the PROMISE Act) that saddles taxpayers from around Minnesota with the burden of funding repairs to private and public property in the Twin Cities that was destroyed by the George Floyd riots. This bill, if passed, will also increase sales taxes and trigger an investigation into the law enforcement and National Guard response to the unrest.”

Let me talk for rural voters on this. Frey let the rioters and looters demolish his city when he could’ve prevented the violence. Now he expects the rest of Minnesota to pay for his incompetence? I don’t think so.

It’s one thing for Minnesotans to pay for natural disasters. That’s what we’ve always done. This isn’t that, though. This time, the rioting and looting weren’t an act of God. This was the result of major mayoral mismanagement. It’s what to expect from a ditzy progressive mayor who’s more activist/airhead than leader. Based on this video, he’s mostly a wimp:

Republicans need to tell the DFL to take a hike. Republicans need to say that we aren’t paying for their activists’ (think Black Lives Matter, Antifa) lawlessness. The Democrats’ spinelessness, unhinged activism and connection with radicals like BLM and Antifa led to these buildings getting demolished. Had the DFL cared more about protecting the people than about having an issue for the campaign, we wouldn’t be in this position. Also, electing Jacob Frey instead of someone that’s competent is a stain on the DFL. It says where the DFL’s priorities lie.

The DFL Speaker of the House keeps preventing the people from being heard. She’s assisted Gov. Walz in maintaining autocratic rule over the state of Minnesota. Now that there’s a special session underway and she wants to pass some DFL bills, she’s suddenly in favor of hearing from the people. Hortman doesn’t really want to hear from the people of Minnesota. She just wants to pass some leftist anti-police legislation that Gov. Walz wants passed.

At this point, Gov. Walz’s initiatives shouldn’t be taken seriously. Too often, his policies have failed Minnesotans. Letting COVID-infected patients back into long-term care facilities literally killed people. Gov. Walz’s Department of Health turned a blind eye toward programs that illegally shipped money to the DFL’s special interest allies while cheating taxpayers.

Senate Republicans are supposed to have a say in how the state is governed. Instead, Gov. Walz has insisted that he make all the decisions without advice from the legislature. That’s how banana republics in Africa operate. That isn’t how things work in the United States. If Walz wants something, he’ll need to do something he hasn’t done much of. He’ll need to a) relinquish his autocratic authority and b) do some good-faith negotiating.

If Gov. Walz insists on playing the part of a dictator, then Republicans should tell him that they don’t take orders from dictators. If Ms. Hortman insists that Republicans listen to the people, Republicans should tell her that listening to the people isn’t a situational thing. Legislators are the people’s voice. Walz doesn’t speak for each different city or community. That’s the legislators’ responsibility.

Gov. Walz shouldn’t turn the dials on which businesses open and which businesses get financially ruined. If we had a legitimate leader, Minnesota’s economy wouldn’t have tanked like it has. It’s time to turn the page on Tim Walz. He’s a failure. He mishandled the COVID pandemic, with hundreds of our most vulnerable dying needlessly. He utterly failed with the Floyd riots, with minority neighborhoods getting destroyed because of Walz’s and Frey’s inaction. Walz failed by letting vandals demolish a statue of Christopher Columbus while state troopers stood by.

After the statue was toppled, Walz said that he’s upset and that there will be consequences. I’ll believe it when I see it. Thus far, Walz has been a wimp. We don’t need people who promise consequences after-the-fact. We need proactive leaders who do the right thing the first time. That person isn’t Tim Walz. It’s time for him to be shoved off the stage.

As for Ms. Hortman, I suspect that she’s serving her only term as Speaker. She’s represented the Twin Cities only. She hasn’t represented the other parts of the state.

What are We Learning in a Pandemic?
By Ramblin’ Rose

Public school teachers are patting themselves on the back, at least on social media, for having met the challenge to deliver distance learning to some 56 million students. On April 15, 2020 in an opinion piece in the St. Cloud Times, Aaron Sinclair, the superintendent of the Sauk Rapids-Rice school district, lauded the efforts of all to quickly transition from the classroom to virtual learning. He acknowledged a few difficulties and then proceeded to thank all who made the rapid change and continued the learning. That was “happy talk.” That does not match the reality of the fiasco.

Admittedly, within a couple of weeks, teachers did have materials available online for students. But how many 20-minute videos can elementary students view every day? How many worksheets can be completed after each video? Children cannot just sit all day. They need to move. They have been forced to become passive receptors of the talking heads on screens. What if they have questions? Parents may have the answers but many won’t. Very few will have the content information that the teachers do.

One assumes that middle school and high school students are also assigned similar scenarios. Even good students become mesmerized and bored on a chair in front of a screen EVERY day.

Does the pre-recorded, hollow statement “Good job, class” really motivate learners to stay on task and try to do even more?

What about the parents? Were they prepared to supervise their children’s lessons? Did they want the job? How can they handle the job if they are also working from home? Parents who try to help only one child reportedly cry at the end of the day—and some during the day—out of frustration with trying to understand the required work so that they might help their child. Now imagine a parent with more than one learner at home. And how many families have opted out completely?

Parents have been forced into homeschooling and must teach lessons that have been imposed on them and their children. The results for the children and families do not reflect those listed by Mr. Sinclair.

  1. How many schools have changed many of the classes to “optional?”
  2. How many districts have already suspended the rest of the academic year—even distance learning?
  3. How many learners have abandoned their work—even the gifted ones?
  4. If the talented learners have given up, how long ago did the challenged learners quit trying?

Could not the districts empower the families to embrace learning and provide some more practical activities? Could not some of the assignments be “optional” or “supplementary” resources from which the students and parents could choose when they want some guidance from the professionals?

Why not have younger children read to their parents and parents to their children? Reading is fun and instructional. The books are chosen by children based on interest. If they have questions, the parents likely are prepared to answer them. And it’s snuggle time. During this pandemic, the bonding with family and the security found in the togetherness are essential.

Why not teach math following recipes in the kitchen or a carpentry project in the garage? Both options involve measuring, fractions, addition, subtraction, etc. in a real-world context. Again, parents and children are working together in a mutually selected activity. It’s fun; it’s less stressful than assignments that, at times, challenge even the most devoted parents. What happens when the child and parent do not agree with the answer given by the teacher? (I saw that happen. The child shrugs her shoulders; the parent shakes her head.) What was the lesson learned? Who owns the confusion?

Those younger learners could still have Zoom time—see their classmates and friends, sharing stories of the fun things they learned in the last week. Teachers could guide the conversations and relate their learning to more academic themes, if appropriate. During the week, the teacher could chat with each student alone, even quizzing them on math problems or spelling words, as well as being there to support and encourage them with real words of praise, as appropriate. The child could read to the teacher to validate continuing academic progress. The teacher would still be a person and not just a bobbing head on a screen.

For older students, could they not become Socrates, pose a question of personal interest related to the course, research it and do a virtual conference with the teacher and explain what they learned and submit a short summary about the project—the reason for it, the process followed to complete it, and share the final answer to the Socratic question? It would still involve screen time, but the control would be with the learner. Undoubtedly, more learning would occur on a self-directed project than on another video lesson followed by more worksheets. The teacher would be a mentor throughout the project and would provide academic feedback upon completion of the assignment.

During the first week of distance learning, there was an abundance of jokes about distraught parents locking their kids outside for a fire drill or in the basement for a tornado drill while they sang the praises of the public school teachers. Those jokes are almost non-existent currently; they are not humorous. They accurately reveal the frustrations that many families are experiencing with “homeschooling.”

Some public educators also expressed concern about “homeschooling” but for very different reasons. Harvard Law School professor Elizabeth Bartholet and other educators expressed their fear about having parents in charge of teaching their own children. In their words, it is “important that children grow up exposed to community values, social values, democratic values, ideas about nondiscrimination and tolerance of other people’s viewpoints.” Bartholet called parents too authoritarian. She also challenged their preparedness to teach their own children.

Parents want what is best for their children…and hopefully, the majority of public school teachers do too. Due to the pandemic, parents have restructured their professional lives in order to teach their children as mandated by state governments. And, sadly, there is an entire cult, like Bartholet, that believes that government should have control “from the womb to the tomb.”

What will PreK-12 education look like next fall? Will schools reopen? Will distance learning continue? Will more parents opt to homeschool with a curriculum that they select and truly become their children’s teacher? Will they happily return their children to classroom teachers? Do public schools fear a loss of students to homeschoolers?

And another question, right before the start of the pandemic, did not the experts plead with parents to reduce the amount of time that young children, especially, spend with devices? With the advent of whole scale distance learning, those experts are mute.

On to higher education…

On April 18th, the results of a Axios and College Reactions poll reported “… 77 percent of college students say that “distance learning is worse or much worse than in-person classes,” while 13 percent say “they would take time off from college if distance learning continues next year.”

That contradicts the push of many university administrators for classes and even entire programs to be delivered electronically. Many faculty and students have objected to those initiatives but gone unheard. Let’s hope that this poll has reached the administrators.

While the pandemic has forced the closure of schools and campuses, institutions of higher learning had already suffered great declines in enrollment numbers. How much could be related to the delivery programs, as well as the debt levels that have resulted from degrees that did not and do not lead to gainful employment?

While there is nothing wrong with “self-fulfillment/self-realization,” should not an education allow one to earn a living? For example, one student asked taxpayers to pay off her college debt–$226,000 for a degree in Greek mythology. Did she really expect to earn a living with that particular degree? For many, that interest falls more into the category of a hobby than a career.

Well, maybe that student is not alone in considering a special interest legitimate. Castleton University in Vermont, with electronically mediated instruction as the norm, is offering credit for learning to play a computer game–Dungeons and Dragons. The justification for the course is the need for people to build community. Seriously? College credit?

The Strada Education Network poll has found that 28 million students plan to abandon their postsecondary education due to the Wuhan virus. The majority of those who indicated an intention to pursue training within the next six months will not be pursuing a degree program.

The American Council on Education projects a 15% decline in postsecondary enrollment in the fall and a $45 billion decline in revenue. Numerous administrators find those projections too rosy.

Precipitous declines are also on the horizon for the Minnesota State universities this fall. For those institutions, here’s their anticipated enrollment declines by university for this fall:

  1. Bemidji – 949 FYE
  2. Mankato – 2,870 FYE
  3. Metro – 747 FYE
  4. Moorhead – 1,335 FYE
  5. Southwest– 628 FYE
  6. SCSU – 1,496 FYE
  7. Winona – 2,350 FYE

FYE is the concept of a full-year equivalent, not the number of bodies on campus rolls. This concept is used in budgeting and reflects only courses that award credits or satisfy requirements in an academic or vocational program. The FYE is determined by dividing the total student credit hours by the credit hours of a full load (30 credit hours for undergraduate and professional courses and 20 for graduate courses).

As a point of comparison, ten years ago, SCSU touted 15,096 FYE. That’s a precipitous decline. But the decline has been occurring throughout the decade. The academic year just concluded had already fallen to 9016 FYE. The projected numbers for Fall 2020 are horrific.

Who will be enrolling in the fall? Will students return if there are only online classes? Will parents opt for cheaper public institutions rather than the costly private ones? Will the lack of athletic programs discourage certain students to attend? Since students were not able to take the ACT and SAT entrance exams and schools have waived those scores, will the entering students be academically prepared for the expected rigors of higher education?

The pandemic has caused many types of losses. Will the American educational system be another victim? Or, could an enhanced model that focuses on the students be on the horizon?

If people haven’t noticed, the DFL is throwing this year’s election away. The DFL is throwing it away in multiple ways. First, the DFL supported Gov. Walz’s autocratic rules during the COVID pandemic. Gov. Walz shut down Minnesota’s economy, then kept it shut way longer than it needed to be. Meanwhile, Gov. Walz ignored the people while trusting a COVID model thrown together by a pair of college grad students over a weekend. Nothing says trust me like a COVID model that’s highly inaccurate but wasn’t peer-reviewed.

The ‘Party of Government’ put together a COVID model that, initially, was off by 20,000 in terms of deaths. Then we were told that we had to still shelter-in-place to prevent the peak from overwhelming hospitals and clinics. According to the grad student models, that’s still a month away. What a joke. The so-called ‘Party of Government’ is the actually the ‘Party of Incompetence.’

Next came the protests in front of the Governor’s mansion. People were mad as hell with Gov. Walz and they let him know about it. They let Gov. Walz and the DFL know that they didn’t appreciate them boarding up their businesses while sending recovering COVID patients to nursing homes. People didn’t like that because it killed seniors living in nursing homes and assisted living facilities unnecessarily.

After George Floyd’s murder, the DFL decided that this was the time that they could push their farther-than-far-left agenda. The DFL started with protests, then moved to looting and pillaging before advancing to rioting and vandalism. It didn’t help that the House Majority Leader tweeted that a gas tanker truck had plowed into people and that this driver’s truck was covered with confederate flags and “white nationalist insignias’:

The DFL is telling their most loyal constituency, the minority community, that they aren’t worthy of police protection. On top of all that, native Americans tore down a statue of Christopher Columbus that’s located on the Capitol grounds. While that statue was toppled, State Troopers were ordered to stand down. After the statue was toppled, the Troopers were instructed to stand in a circle around the toppled statue:

Nothing says societal instability like a lack of law enforcement and a spineless governor. Gov. Walz won’t stand up to the special interests. We know that because he hasn’t done that yet. Why would we think that he’ll change that pattern now? Further, these special interests are led by idiots like Jeremiah Ellison and Lisa Bender and extremists like Steve Fletcher.

That trio, combined with Tim Walz and Jacob Frey, are the faces of the DFL Office of Incompetence and Stupidity. If you want to find that office in the State organizational chart, it’s part of the Minnesota Department of Human Rights. Another part of it is found in the Minnesota Department of Human Sacrifices Services. Still another part of that office is found where MNLARS used to be.

Seriously, Democrats in the executive branch are idiots. Wherever you find the DFL in the legislative branch, you find slush funds for their special interest allies. Isn’t that a surprise?

This won’t play well in the suburbs. Suburbanites prefer stability and predictability. Thanks to the DFL, suburbanites don’t have either of those things. They don’t have sensible leadership, either.

The Christopher Columbus statue at the Minnesota state capitol was destroyed today. According the AP article, “Protesters in Minnesota on Wednesday pulled down a statue of Christopher Columbus outside the state Capitol amid continuing anger over the death of George Floyd. The protesters threw a rope around the 10-foot bronze statue Wednesday afternoon and pulled it off its stone pedestal.”

The article continues, saying “The protesters, including Dakota and Ojibwe Indians, said they consider Columbus a symbol of genocide against Native Americans. They said they had tried many times to remove it through the political process, but without success.”

The part that most Minnesotans will be paying attention to is where it says “State Patrol troopers in helmets, who provide security in the Capitol complex, stood by at a distance but did not try to stop the protesters, who celebrated afterward with Native American singing and drumming.” The first question is this: why didn’t the State Patrol intervene before the statue was toppled? That isn’t to say that the State Patrol is corrupt. That’s the first question because we want to know who told the troopers not to intervene.

The article clearly states that the Troopers “provide security in the Capitol complex.” It also says that they “stood by at a distance but didn’t try to stop the protesters.” If the Troopers’ responsibility is to provide security, why didn’t they secure the Capitol complex? This is eerily reminiscent of Jacob Frey’s order to police to stand down when rioters destroyed the Third Precinct Police Station.

The difference is that Jacob Frey isn’t giving orders to State Troopers. He can’t give orders to state workers any more than Gov. Walz can give orders to the Minneapolis Police Chief. What makes this even stranger is that this video shows the State Troopers guarding the toppled statue:

This has Gov. Walz’s fingerprints all over it. It’s logical that he’s the one that would give final approval of such a decision. I spoke with a friend of mine about who’d make the final decision. My friend said that it’s likely made by the Department of Administration but that Gov. Walz would likely have to give his approval, too.

That’s another instance of Gov. Walz caving to the DFL fringe. It’s another opportunity lost by Walz to showcase his leadership. During the early days of the George Floyd riots, Gov. Walz didn’t respond. Buildings burned, neighborhoods destroyed, lives shattered. Today, Gov. Walz could’ve ordered the Troopers to protect the statue. Instead, he was AWOL while the statue toppled.

The only leadership in the DFL is being shown by Ilhan Omar, Keith and Jeremiah Ellison and Lisa Bender. The bad news for sane Minnesotans is that they’re crazier than AOC. Jacob Frey and Tim Walz haven’t shown any leadership.

In this column, WSJ columnist James Freeman essentially indicted Minnesota’s DFL Gov. Tim Walz. Gov. Walz is following in Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s footsteps in putting nursing home residents at risk. This isn’t surprising since Democrats are fairly used to following a script.

It’s been known for more than a month that the elderly and those with weak immune systems can’t handle the COVID virus. Despite that understanding, “Minnesota has been implementing the disastrous Covid-19 strategy made famous by New York’s Gov. Andrew Cuomo. The essence of the plan is to forcefully reduce the income of people at low risk, while simultaneously increasing the chances of virus exposure for those at high risk.”

This is how crises get extended. Sending COVID-infected seniors to nursing homes is a potential death sentence. This isn’t putting 2 and 2 together and getting 4. It’s more like putting 2 and 2 together and getting 9. Freeman cites a Star Tribune article, too:

Early in the pandemic, the Minnesota Department of Health turned to nursing homes and other long-term care facilities to relieve the burden on hospitals that were at risk of being overwhelmed by COVID-19 patients. Minnesota hospitals have since discharged dozens of infected patients to nursing homes, including facilities that have undergone large and deadly outbreaks of the disease, state records show…

One such facility, North Ridge Health and Rehab in New Hope, has accepted 42 patients from hospitals and other long-term care facilities since mid-April even as the coronavirus has raged through its 320-bed nursing home, killing 48 of its patients and infecting scores more.

The first outbreak of COVID deaths happened at a nursing home in Kirkland, Washington. It was above-the-fold-front-page news for a week or more. I can picture someone slow like Gov. Walz not picking up on that clue but there’s no reason why his public health people shouldn’t have picked up on that. Instead of noticing, Minnesotans got another example of the blind leading the blind.

According to this KARE11 video, the Walz administration didn’t figure out a plan to fix the Walz-induced crisis until 2 weeks ago:

The Walz administration’s cavalier attitude towards problem-solving is disgraceful. They’ve created more problems than they’ve solved. It’s fair to say that the Walz administration didn’t protect nursing home residents. He’s as disgraceful as Gov. Cuomo. Then again, what would you expect from a pair of airheaded Democrats?

Joe Biden thinks that wearing a mask “projects leadership.” That’s what he told CNN’s Dana Bash in an interview right after Memorial Day. Later, Biden said “The truth of the matter is that I think you’re supposed to lead by example, and one of the things our governor has said he wants to keep social distancing, stay at home has been the order, until June 1 of this year. And so I think it’s important that – look, 100,000 deaths and at least 35,000 to 50,000 were avoidable, but for lack of attention and ego, I think. And just – so – and you know me, I’m usually the last one to leave an event, I like interacting with people. But, I hope to be able to do more, but we’re going to do it by the numbers, because I think it’s important because this is not over.”

Wearing a mask in the situations President Trump found himself in — outside, in bright sunlight and with family — are situations that don’t require a mask, especially outside in bright sunlight. COVID doesn’t last long in that situation. A potent argument can be made that using the right precautions in the right situations is leadership.

Be that as it may, President Trump showed leadership on January 31 when he stopped flights with China. What did Joe do? Check it out:

Later, Biden admitted that stopping those flights were the right thing to do. Leadership comes from getting the big decisions right the first time. Had Biden been president, he would’ve let untold numbers of COVID-infected people into the United States, spreading the contagion across the nation. That would’ve created a crisis the likes of which we haven’t seen since 1918.

President Trump brought together captains of industry in the Rose Garden to put together a response to testing. CVS, Walmart, Walgreens and other companies brainstormed ideas to make testing super-accessible and free. Joe Biden wouldn’t have had a clue who to bring together. President Trump told Peter Navarro to get ventilators built ASAP. Here’s what happened:

“In under 11 days, General Motors sourced materials, converted a manufacturing facility and trained a workforce to build lifesaving ventilators in Kokomo, IN.” Saving lives by manufacturing ventilators in record time is bigtime leadership that Joe Biden couldn’t make happen if Americans’ lives depended on it. Wearing a goofy-looking mask when he’s already social distanced is preening for the cameras. It isn’t leadership.

President Trump has his faults but they’re nothing like Biden’s. Biden provided ‘leadership’ on the 1994 crime bill that started mass incarcerations. President Trump provided leadership by fixing Biden’s mess:

Tearing families apart isn’t leadership. Reuniting families requires leadership.

This article highlights DFL Gov. Tim Walz’s incompetence. In it, we learn that “A Minnesota National Guard unit botched COVID-19 testing for 300 residents and staff members at a St. Paul nursing home Monday, leaving many with pain, discomfort and bloody noses.” That’s just the start of the litany of problems. Then there’s this:

In what one health official acknowledged was “a disaster,” the test samples from Episcopal Church Home were later ruined because they were not stored in coolers while being transported to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester. State officials quickly apologized to Episcopal Homes leaders and said they’ve already taken steps to ensure such mistakes aren’t repeated. Nevertheless, an elder care advocate said the incident raises serious questions about whether Minnesota can accurately and effectively carry out widespread testing.

It’s the leaders’ responsibility to establish proper procedures. Gov. Walz and Commissioner Malcolm share the blame for not establishing those procedures. Further, they share the blame for not getting the right supplies in the right hands at the right time.

Kris Sundberg, the executive director of Elder Voice Family Advocates said what everyone was thinking when she said “This just further erodes any trust that we have had in the Department of Health. I think we have a long way to go to really have the clearly thought-out protocols we need in order to do [widespread] testing.” I’d expect better execution from the Washington Generals than we got from this leadership team.

A statement Wednesday from the Minnesota State Lab Partnership acknowledged “that there was an isolated incident related to the packaging and shipment of specimens to one of the testing sites. Ensuring the temperature integrity of specimens is critical to testing. We are accelerating and strengthening our training program to ensure all specimen collections, packaging, and shipping are performed to the highest standards.”

You’ve got to be kidding me. The program was put in place without training the personnel first? This is Frontline Management 101. This isn’t a graduate level course.

Jan Malcolm, state health commissioner, also apologized. In an e-mail to Plakut Wednesday, she said officials have been working to quickly develop new training and protocols for swabbing and infection control at long-term care facilities, but “in this rapid launch, important steps in the process were missed and there were miscommunications.”

Incompetence is this administration’s hallmark. Minnesotans had hoped that getting rid of Mark Dayton would turn the page on incompetence. Based on results thus far, it’s apparent that Minnesotans placed their hope in the wrong candidate. After viewing this video, it’s apparent that the DFL is devoid of competent leaders:

Melvin Carter is the African-American version of Tim Walz. They’re both timid. They’re both unwilling to trust the people. Apparently, trusting people isn’t the DFL way.

The thing that’s inescapable from this article is that the Tim Walz administration doesn’t give a damn about residents of long-term care facilities, aka LTC facilities. It isn’t often that I’d utilize such over-the-top language but this time, it’s found in the Star Tribune article itself. Check it out if you don’t trust me.

The article opens by saying “Despite the devastating death toll, Minnesota nursing homes are still being allowed by state regulators to admit coronavirus patients who have been discharged from hospitals. Early in the pandemic, the Minnesota Department of Health turned to nursing homes and other long-term care facilities to relieve the burden on hospitals that were at risk of being overwhelmed by COVID-19 patients. Minnesota hospitals have since discharged dozens of infected patients to nursing homes, including facilities that have undergone large and deadly outbreaks of the disease, state records show.”

This is almost as frightening:

Now that practice is drawing strong opposition from some lawmakers, residents’ families and health watchdogs, who warn that such transfers endanger residents of senior homes that are understaffed and ill-equipped to contain the spread of the coronavirus.

Why just some lawmakers? Why aren’t all lawmakers upset with this stupidity? Further, Minnesota’s hospitals never got overwhelmed. Why did the Walz administration turn to “nursing homes and other long-term care facilities”? My annual physical was scheduled for late-January. That got postponed because the clinic was converted to overflow for the St. Cloud Hospital at the start of COVID. The appointment was rescheduled again to March 31. Again, I was told that it was related to COVID. The entire clinic was emptied out to create extra bed space.

The point is that hospitals and clinics prepared for a spike in COVID cases. There never was a threat to hospitals running out of space in Minnesota. There might’ve been a chance we wouldn’t have had enough staffing but that’s a different contingency to plan for. LTCs certainly weren’t better staffed than hospitals. This is the closest video I found in an hour of searching dealing with the topic of nursing homes in the past week:

The number of COVID-related deaths are increasing as a direct result of sending COVID-infected seniors into LTCs. This doesn’t require medical school training to figure out. It requires a memory of what Andrew Cuomo did in New York. This proposal should be immediately rejected:

They are calling for more state scrutiny over transfers, including stricter standards over which nursing homes should be allowed to accept COVID-19 patients from hospitals.

Wrong! They shouldn’t be allowed into nursing homes. Period. If nothing else, the state should set up a facility that could hold those elderly COVID-19 patients. Why set things up so that an entire facility gets infected? Karin Housley positively nailed it:

“It makes no sense to bring more COVID-19 patients into facilities that have already failed to protect them,” said Sen. Karin Housley, the Republican chairwoman of the Senate Family Care and Aging Committee. “If it were my mom or dad in one of these facilities, I would be really worried.”

This is frightening:

State health officials and long-term care industry representatives have defended the practice of discharging some COVID-19 patients to nursing homes, saying it is part of a broader strategy to conserve critical hospital beds during the pandemic. Long-term care facilities can provide treatment for coronavirus patients who still need care, but have stabilized enough that they no longer require hospitalization, officials said.

How’s that worked thus far? Thus far, 80% of COVID deaths have happened at nursing homes. That indicates that these ‘experts’ have been wrong.