Search
Archives

You are currently browsing the archives for the Accountability category.

Categories

Archive for the ‘Accountability’ Category

At last week’s hearing about the crisis within the Minnesota Department of Human Services, it became instantly clear that transparency and cooperation weren’t priorities for top HHS officials:

To get the answers to those questions, Benson and Sen. Jim Abeler, R-Anoka, asked seven current and former top DHS brass to attend the hearing. They included Lourey and his chief of staff, Stacie Weeks; the on-leave inspector general, Carolyn Ham; acting inspector general Bob Jacobsen; and the two department deputies who resigned, then unresigned in the wake of Lourey’s departure: Claire Wilson and Chuck Johnson. But of those seven invitees, only one showed up: acting DHS Commissioner Pam Wheelock, who took the job July 15 and will relinquish it to new DHS Commissioner Jodi Harpstead on Sept. 3.

This was Gov. Walz’s equivalent of giving Sen. Benson the finger. While campaigning, Gov. Walz said that transparency and unity would be cornerstones of his administration. The evidence is now in. It proves that Gov. Walz doesn’t put a high priority on transparency, cooperation or unity.

Carolyn Ham, disgraced HHS IG
It figures that the only official that showed up is the person that’s leaving. That fits perfectly with the Walz administration’s governance-by-stiff-arm philosophy.

The lack of participation — and the subsequent paucity of new information revealed – was anticipated by Benson in her opening comments, in which she compared trying to get information out of the agency with the arcade game “Whack-a-Mole.” “Somehow the Legislature never gets direct answers,” Benson said. “It’s time for the shoulder-shrugging to stop. And for those who say it’s time to move on, that there’s nothing to see here, I can tell you it’s not time to move on; it is time to learn a lesson.”

If the DFL wants to offer nothing but silence on why there’s rampant fraud in several major programs, that’s their right — for the moment. Don’t be surprised if the DFL’s refusal to be transparent is turned into a potent campaign issue. If Minnesotans hope to determine why there’s rampant chaos within HHS, they’ll need to rely on Michelle Benson and Jim Abeler.

Jim Nobles is the other official who will get to the bottom of this. It won’t come from the Walz administration:

After 10 minutes of Wheelock going through slides describing the agency’s functions and beneficiaries, Benson interrupted.
“We sent a list of the topics we were interested in and so far you haven’t hit on any of those, and I am wondering when your presentation is going to get to those?” she asked.
“I’ll get to those very quickly,” Wheelock answered.
“I think now would be a good time,” Benson said.

As obvious as it is that Wheelock was stalling, that isn’t the galling part of her presentation. This is:

“At some point, we have to accept that these are personal choices,” she continued. “I have not found any issue about impropriety. I have not found any issue about any kind of criminal activity. There is no scandal. There is no chaos. I think it’s time to move on and let these people have some personal privacy and lives.”

Right. Toney Lourey accepted a government job that afforded him a annual pay raise of over $100,000 dollars, then abandons it 6 months later. That happens all the time. It’s virtually routine. Not. There’s no question that there’s a scandal here. Jim Nobles investigated the matter. He determined that there was rampant fraud.

If these DFL bureaucrats and DFL legislators want to say that there isn’t a scandal within HHS, that’s a fight Republicans should be thrilled to fight.

Anyone that thinks that the Minnesota Department of Human Services crisis will soon be a thing of the past is either delusional or they didn’t see Jodi Harpstead’s opening interview on Almanac Friday night. Fortunately for those that want to be well-informed but were otherwise detained, I DVRed the interview. This is that interview:

The first thing that Ms. Harpstead said is “Well, what I know first is that the people at the Department of Human Services are the same sort of caring and competent people that I work with at Lutheran Social Services.” When I think of Lutheran Social Services, aka LSS, caring and competent aren’t part of the list of nouns and adjectives I’d use to describe LSS. Unless there’s divine intervention at LSS and HHS, those words won’t become part of my list of nouns and adjectives describing those organizations.

When Eric Eskola asked Ms. Harpstead where the problem areas existed, Ms. Harpstead replied “Yeah, well, this year, there’s been a lot of change, a lot of public change, there’s been some morale issues and we need to get to work on all of that. When asked what was the first things she’d dive into, Ms. Harpstead replied “Well, the very first thing that I hope to bring is calm and healing and rebuilding teamwork among the people in the Department. They’ve been through a lot this year and they need to have a lot of that settle down so they can get back to their good and effective work.”

Notice that Ms. Harpstead didn’t mention a word about eliminating the corruption or fraud that Legislative Auditor Jim Nobles found. With Ms. Harpstead, it’s all about restoring morale to the workers. Up to this point in the interview, she hasn’t mentioned a word about eliminating the fraud and corruption identified within HHS. Pay attention to Ms. Harpstead’s underlying message. Hint: It doesn’t have anything to do with eliminating fraud or corruption.

Further, insisting that HHS has done “good and effective work” is like insisting that the Titanic didn’t sink that fast. Here’s more from the interview:

They’ve been through a lot this year. They’ve been through a lot of public scrutiny. There’s been all kinds of comments made about their work and we need to get past that and get back to the good work that they do. When asked about how she’ll deal with the “pretty low threshold” in terms of credibility, Ms. Harpstead replied “Well, first of all, I’d say that low credibility — I appreciate what you’re saying — has not been my experience working with the Department of Human Services and so I think we need to get in there and settle things down, get back to work and do the good work that the Department has always done and yet we still have to solve some of the problems that are there, move on from there and have the Department get back to the work it does.”

Later, Ms. Harpstead said that “The Department needs some space, though, to regroup and rebuild its teamwork to get back to its good work.” Please, someone on the Senate Health and Human Services Finance and Policy Committee that she isn’t walking into a smooth-running department with a reputation for integrity and excellence. She’s walking into a department in turmoil that’s known for “rampant fraud”, corruption and arrogance. They haven’t gotten this reputation by accident. They’ve earned this reputation.

Based on Ms. Harpstead’s statements, she seems oblivious to the things that need fixing. If she maintains that attitude, this crisis will get worse.

The forever-indispensable Harold Hamilton, aka Minnesota Watchdog, provided a ‘history lesson’ of sorts on HHS’s failings in his most recent commentary. In his commentary, Hamilton noted the following:

  1. October 2013: MNsure (Obamacare) web site launch failure. Ultimately, the web site would cost $190 million to get up and running.
  2. January 2016: A failure to properly determine eligibility for various programs results in at least $271 million in improper benefits being paid.
  3. July 2017: $7.7 million in fraudulent Medicaid payments discovered.
  4. April 2018: DHS writes off over $30 million in Minnesota Care premiums because of software problems.
  5. May 2018: The OLA reports significant problems with oversight of the DHS Childcare Assistance Program (CCAP). OLA noted, “DHS did not implement sufficient program integrity controls for licensing childcare providers and lacked some key controls to identify errors and to inhibit, track, and recover improper payments.”
  6. July 2018: Data breach at DHS exposes the personal data of 21,000 citizens.
  7. September 2018: Data breach at DHS exposes the personal data of 3,000 citizens.
  8. April 2019: Data breach at DHS exposes the personal data of 11,000 citizens.
  9. June 2019: Medical director at DHS demands more agency accountability measures – gets fired.
  10. July 2019: After placing the DHS Inspector General on investigatory leave, it’s revealed that the investigation has yet to even begin.
  11. July 2019: Top deputies resign.
  12. July 2019: DHS commissioner resigns after only months on the job.
  13. August 2019: DHS overpays two Indian tribes over $25 million, OLA starts investigation.

Think about all those crises. Then think about who was the person in charge of either the oversight of HHS or in charge of running HHS itself. The man’s name is Tony Lourey. First, he co-wrote the bill that created MNsure. Then he ignored the warning signs that the website wouldn’t run properly when it went live. Then he ignored Michelle Benson’s criticisms that MNsure needed legitimate oversight.

Meanwhile, the Dayton administration kept ignoring data breaches, most likely because they didn’t have the expertise required to fix these problems. In light of the Democrats’ failings, why should we have faith that the Department will suddenly get run smoothly? The truth is that the Party of Big Government, aka the DFL, aka Democrats, have a lengthy history of failing Minnesota’s taxpayers in terms of running government properly.

To be blunt, Tim Walz and Mark Dayton have failed the people. The people shouldn’t have trusted them whatsoever. Let’s forget their public personas. Let’s focus on their ineptitude instead. Let’s look at their handling of budget negotiations, too.

Dayton either shut down the government or he required a special session in 3 of his 4 budget sessions. In one of his budget sessions, he negotiated an entire week with Speaker Kurt Daudt and Senate Majority Leader Tom Bakk. They couldn’t reach a deal. The final Friday of the session, they sat down and put together a bipartisan budget deal in less than an hour. Then Dayton rejected it, taking the legislature into special session.

This year, Gov. Tim Walz insisted on a $12,000,000,000 tax increase over 4 years despite the fact that his own MMB director said that the state had a massive balance in the state’s Rainy Day Fund and that we were projected to run a surplus in excess of $1,000,000,000. Gov. Walz and the DFL House still insisted on the tax increase after it was announced that revenues were coming in faster than projected. Paul Gazelka ended the argument with this great chart:

Let’s be blunt about this. The DFL has caused one budget disaster after another. Even when money is pouring in, the DFL has insisted on taking a higher percentage of your paycheck. Once the GOP has forced some sensibility into the budgeting process and the budget is signed into law, Gov. Walz and the DFL insist on running 1 fraud-riddled program after another.

To top this off, the DFL specializes in thwarting transparency. Gov. Walz even picked an anti-transparency expert to run the Minnesota Department of Health and Human Services, the most anti-transparency and fraud-riddled department in the state.

What part of this suggests competence? What part of this suggests that the DFL approves of transparency? Here’s a hint: none of this suggests that the DFL is competent. None of this information suggests that the DFL approves of transparency.

Just when you thought it couldn’t get worse within Minnesota’s Department of Health and Human Services, Gov. Tim Walz makes it much worse. Gov. Walz made the situation much worse by picking Jodi Harpstead to take over as commissioner of HHS in September.

Commissioner Harpstead is currently employed as the CEO of Lutheran Social Services, aka LSS. For the past 5+ years, LSS has specialized in the Refugee Resettlement program. That means that they’ve specialized in hiding important details about who was coming into Minnesota’s communities. This isn’t speculation. It’s well-documented fact.

When former City Councilman Jeff Johnson participated in a discussion on the refugee resettlement program, he expressed frustration with LSS:

To summarize that meeting, what I saw, four things were occurring. One, we have a nonprofit religious organization, OK, taking federal dollars, and they were pocketing approximately $1,000 per refugee. The allocation’s about 3,300 (dollars), but they got to keep about $1,000 per refugee, OK? They were not being transparent with the public, and it got to the point where they actually had a deputy at the door monitoring who was coming into the meetings. And I said you need to open up these meetings because you’re using federal dollars, you’re a nonprofit organization, and to me it was becoming apparent that they were acting like a for-profit corporation.

LSS was the volag running the meetings. Now, Gov. Walz has tapped the CEO of LSS to be the commissioner of HHS. Saying that HHS is embroiled in a crisis is understatement. Part of the crisis is rampant fraud within HHS.

When HHS Commissioner Tony Lourey abruptly resigned last month, he didn’t say why he was leaving, other than saying that the Department needed new leadership that he wasn’t capable of providing. The week prior to Lourey’s resignation, his 2 deputies resigned without an explanation. They’ve since returned to their positions.

If ever there was a department that needed a massive infusion of transparency, HHS is it. Hiring a woman whose current organization specializes in hiding things from government officials isn’t a first step towards building confidence with the public.

This hiring smacks of arrogance in the worst way. This is Gov. Walz’s attempt to stiff-arm the legislature, at least the part that gives a damn about providing oversight. (At this point, the DFL House isn’t interested in providing oversight.)

This week, Senate Republicans held a 3.5 hour-long oversight hearing into why “the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe and the White Earth Nation received $25.3 million in excess payments for medically assisted treatments covered through Medicaid over several years.” At the hearing, Committee Chair Michelle Benson said “The taxpayers didn’t make this mistake. They’re not the ones who used the judgment to cause the overpayments, why should they be held responsible?” She also said that “lawmakers shouldn’t have to allocate $25 million in additional funds to cover overpayments to two tribes.”

HHS needs a serious culture change. It’s questionable that Ms. Harpstead will provide that type of leadership. The organization she’s currently running specializes in secrecy and stiff-arming local politicians. That isn’t the reputation of a reformer. Make no mistake, either. HHS needs a reformation:

Other DHS employees or former employees shared with the committee their concerns about what they’d faced at the department. The former Medicaid program director told the panel bureaucrats in the department rejected advice from medical professionals and abruptly dismissed him in July.

And Faye Bernstein, a DHS compliance officer, said she was put on temporary leave when she raised concerns about compliance in state contracts. She was later allowed to return to her post and appeared Tuesday on a vacation day. She said she’d received notice ahead of the hearing that she could be terminated for her comments to lawmakers.

Think about that a minute. Bernstein was “put on temporary leave” because “she raised concerns about compliance” issues. If that isn’t proof that HHS needs a total reformation, then it’s hopeless.

The Senate has the constitutional responsibility of confirming commissioners. Unless Sen. Benson’s committee gets proof that Harpstead is serious about changing the culture at HHS, the Senate should reject her, then tell Gov. Walz that he needs to appoint someone who is committed to transparency and reformation.

Gov. Walz took time to visit the Vikings’ training facility. Apparently, he thinks that being the CEO of the state is a part-time responsibility. Thus far, he’s been a huge disappointment.

Tim Walz’s campaign slogan of #OneMinnesota turned into a lie. It didn’t take long for Transparency Tim to turn into Cover-up Tim. It took less than 9 months.

When Tony Lourey resigned in disgrace, he left without an explanation. Earlier, when Lourey’s deputy commissioners left, they left without explanation. When the Department of Human Services improperly sent $25,000,000 to the White Earth and Leech Lake Indian reservations, the Walz administration was as silent as a mime.

Instead, the DFL is attempting to spin its way out of difficulty this way:


This spin just says that there are some important programs within Human Services. It doesn’t prove that those programs/departments are well-run or transparent. Why should I trust people that haven’t given me a reason to trust them? In fact, I’d argue that the DFL and the Walz administration hasn’t just not given me a reason not to trust them but it’s also true that the DFL and the Walz administration have given me tons of reasons not to trust them.

In my estimation, Democrats are both corrupt and inept. Jim Nobles, Minnesota’s Legislative Auditor, stated in a post-investigation report that corruption was “rampant.” Also, Gov. Dayton was easily the most inept governor in Minnesota history. By comparison, Jesse Ventura looked positively Reaganesque. Between Gov. Dayton and Gov. Walz, we’ve received the worst of both worlds.

Why hasn’t Gov. Walz investigated Carolyn Ham? What’s happening there is unacceptable. If that happened in the private sector, Ham would’ve been fired months ago. Ham has collected more than $42,000 since being put on paid leave pending an investigation. It’s noteworthy that the investigation was supposed to start more than 4 months ago. It still hasn’t started.

It sounds to me like Gov. Walz doesn’t want this investigation to happen. If he wanted it to happen, they likely could’ve gotten most of it done by now. It’s apparent that Gov. Walz’s rhetoric about transparency was just talk. His talk hasn’t translated into action. Without the investigation, the problem just persists.

I’m pretty confident that taxpayers want solutions, not excuses. To use a Texas saying, thus far, Gov. Walz has been all hat and no cattle. To steal a cliché from an ancient Wendy’s commercial:

Free Speech: A real option or a pipe dream?
By Ramblin’ Rose

The South Dakota legislature passed HB 1087 this session, and last week, the Board of Regents approved three free speech policies for its campuses.

According to the National Review, “The bill, S.D. 1087, requires public institutions of higher education in the state to ‘maintain a commitment to the principles of free expression’ and to foster civil, intellectually diverse environments. It protects student organizations from viewpoint discrimination, requires an annual report to the legislature on campus intellectual diversity and speech suppression, and safeguards the use of outdoor spaces as forums for free speech.”

The bill was not supported by the educational system, including leaders of student government. The governor signed the bill into law in March, 2019.

The modifications approved by the Board of Regents on August 8 and 9, 2019, require:

  1. Funding for student organizations be made in a “nondiscriminatory manner.”
  2. Public universities will provide a report to the executive director of the Board of Regents about the ways in which the institutions are working to “promote and ensure intellectual diversity.”
  3. That report must also include any campus events that “impeded intellectual diversity and the free exchange of ideas.”

Some recent events that precipitated this legislation include:

  1. USD prohibited in 2015 of the viewing of a film on the “honor killing” of women in Islamic cultures as anti-Muslim bigotry.
  2. In 2018, university officials removed an American flag that a SDSU student had hung in his dorm to commemorate family friends who had died in the 9/11 terrorist attacks.
  3. Last February, USD administrators “urged” a change of name for a campus “Hawaiian Day” observance because they determined it was insensitive to indigenous Hawaiians.

Political fights continue around this issue. More than two dozen states have introduced “free speech” legislation (including Minnesota); more than a dozen of those have those bills signed into law (not Minnesota).

As a skeptic, I wonder about the impact that these laws will have on campuses. Since the majority of faculty members and administrators are left-leaning liberals, will they implement the laws? Will they hire conservative faculty? Liberal professors outnumber conservatives across the nation by five to one; in the humanities and social sciences, the disparity is even greater. That affects the research that is approved/allowed and the ideologies presented as “truth” in classes. I know that students must respond as the professors want or their grades are affected. Walking the halls of institutions of higher learning, one hears the left-wing lies presented as valid facts. Students must accept and regurgitate those views or fail the courses. Young minds are susceptible, and many are quickly converted. Brave souls are dismissed or rebuked—students and faculty.

Heterodox Academy, a non-partisan collaborative of more than 2,500 professors, administrators, and graduate students, espouses that “Intellectual diversity (or viewpoint diversity) occurs when members of a community approach problems and questions from a range of perspectives. An open expressive climate exists when members of a community, regardless of their beliefs, perspectives, or other prior commitments, feel equally able to ask questions, share ideas, and otherwise participate in learning and knowledge production without risk of censure.”

I question if legislation can accomplish that when liberalism is so engrained in all levels of education and solidly in control of higher education in every state. Will the First Amendment be honored in education, or will PC dogma continue to dominate?

God help education, learners and teachers express the truth and debate differing points of view with civility.

When it comes to fighting corruption of all sorts, Tom Fitton’s Judicial Watch is downright impressive. Recently, Judicial Watch won their lawsuit against Los Angeles County. As the result of the lawsuit settlement, Los Angeles County has agreed to “sent notices to as many as 1.5 million inactive voters on its voter rolls. This mailing is a step toward removing the names of voters who have moved, died, or are otherwise ineligible to vote.”

That isn’t everything that California agreed to do:

The massive mailing is the result of a settlement agreement with Judicial Watch requiring the County to remove as many as 1.5 million inactive registrations. In addition, the California secretary of state has alerted other California counties to clean up their voter registration lists to comply with the federal National Voter Registration Act (NVRA), as the secretary promised to do in that same settlement agreement.

Fitton talked about the lawsuit in this tweet:


Last night, Christopher Hahn, a former senior staffer for Chuck Schumer, insisted that we don’t have an illegal voter problem. I wasn’t surprised that another Schumer shill would lie on national TV on important matters like civil rights. I expect it. This settlement says that Schumer’s shill is full of it. Removing 3,500,000 names off voter rolls who shouldn’t be there is a huge thing.

Further, this isn’t a conspiracy theory. It’s a conspiracy. The 1,600,000 names improperly on LA County’s voter rolls clearly are a problem. As a result of this settlement, those figures become findings of facts. This isn’t conjecture. They aren’t theories. They’re as real as gravity.

I expect that other lawsuits will get filed by Judicial Watch and that they’ll win the vast majority of those lawsuits. LA County didn’t settle with Judicial Watch out of the goodness of their heart. They settled because they knew they were likely to lose.

On Saturday, Universal Pictures announced that they were cancelling the release of ‘The Hunt’. The announcement is being treated as a huge victory for conservatives. It isn’t. It’s little more than a temporary appeasement.

In their announcement, the Universal spokesperson said “the studio has decided to cancel our plans to release the film … we understand that now is not the right time to release this film.” That’s the most wishy-washy statement I’ve ever heard. It’s downright disgusting, to be honest.

There isn’t a good time to make that film. It’s everything that’s wrong with the anarchist left. I see this as nothing more than treating a symptom. The underlying disease is kept intact. Hollywood still thinks of Trump supporters as Deplorables. Democrats criticize President Trump for his incendiary rhetoric. How isn’t this 100 times worse?

Democrats, especially the Antifa Wing of their party, hate deplorables. It’s been impossible for elitists to hide their contempt for conservatives. What is Hollywood doing to fix their underlying contempt for conservatism? What is Hollywood doing to fix our chaotic southern border? Hollywood hasn’t shown any interest in stopping the sex trafficking that’s running rampant these days.

These are things that Trump’s supporters care deeply about. While President Trump calls for unity, Democrats have praised division and hatred. To be American, we need shared priorities, shared interest in being virtuous and a belief that, while working together, there’s nothing that Americans can’t do.

People from other parts of the world are welcome here as long as they come by our rules. Bum-rushing an overwhelmed border, then applying for asylum, isn’t how we create a society that helps each other, pulls for each other and builds great things together.

The Hunt has been cancelled but fixing Hollywood is still part of America’s to-do list. Hollywood’s ‘Hate America First’ mentality must stop ASAP. Tolerating the left’s hate-filled attacks is unacceptable.

Anyone that thinks that Ken Martin, the DFL State Party Chairman, is controlling his faculties is kidding themselves. Either that or they’re part of the Twin Cities media. Matt Dean retweeted Martin’s diatribe. After reading Martin’s diatribe, it’s difficult to think that he isn’t a lunatic. Read Martin’s statement, then tell me he doesn’t sound like he’s leading the DFL off a cliff:


Yikes! Reading his diatribe, I count too many lies to count. For instance, Martin insists that President Trump is “destroying this country.” Seriously? Martin apparently hates prosperity because this is the best economy of my lifetime.

Further, Martin ranted this:

The occupant of the White House, Donald Trump, has through his words and actions, given rise to hate speech and violence throughout this country- he is a White nationalist, racist, homophobic, zenophobe [sic], who is destroying our country.

That’s a lengthy list of accusations. Notice that Martin, or any other DFL politician for that matter, hasn’t offered even a tiny morsel of proof to substantiate this wild-eyed diatribe.

That isn’t to say there’s nothing noteworthy in Martin’s diatribe. Martin hasn’t figured this out but it’s what’s actually wrong:

If these shootings were perpetrated by black or brown men, you could bet would have acted by now. However, it seems that our leaders are ok not acting because white people killing people from marginalized communities.

Martin just accused the entire Republican Party of being racist. In his attempt to score political points for the DFL, he threw 40+ percent of Minnesotans under the bus. What a disgusting little man.


Good question, Matt. I didn’t know that it had become acceptable. That being said, I agree with you that the Twin Cities media will fall all over themselves attempting to protect the DFL chairman’s reckless remarks. In fact, a quick Google news search on Martin’s name for the past week shows zero results. It doesn’t get much more silent than zero coverage.

Anyone that thinks that Big Tech plays fair is utterly delusional. To say that Twitter’s actions feel like they’re straight from the Twilight Zone is understatement. Here’s what happened, according to the article:

The move from the NRSC comes after McConnell’s campaign account was locked Wednesday for posting a video of protesters outside his home that included violent threats against the Kentucky Republican. A Twitter spokesperson confirmed the account was temporarily locked for violating the company’s “violent threats policy.” McConnell’s campaign manager, Kevin Golden, said the campaign unsuccessfully appealed the decision and accused Twitter of hypocrisy.

Think about that a second. Twitter suspended Sen. McConnell’s account because they highlighted a video showing violent protesters protesting outside Sen. McConnell’s home.

“Twitter’s hostile actions toward Leader McConnell’s campaign are outrageous, and we will not tolerate it,” said Jesse Hunt, a spokesman for the National Republican Senatorial Committee. “The NRSC will suspend all spending with Twitter until further notice. We will not spend our resources on a platform that silences conservatives.”

The NRCC has announced that it’s suspending advertising its spending via Twitter, too. If Democrats were principled, they’d suspend their advertising on Twitter, too. An attack against Republican campaigns is an attack against the entire election system. Unfortunately, Democrats aren’t principled. What Twitter is doing is as despicable as what Russia did. Putting a thumb on the scale of our election system is beyond reprehensible.


Democrats repeatedly told us that during the Russia Hoax ‘Investigation’. Now that Big Tech is hurting Republicans rather than Russians hurting Democrats, election security doesn’t seem to be a priority to Democrats. Isn’t that amazing? Who would’ve thought that?

I don’t know what the right solution is to Big Tech but this can’t be ignored anymore. Testimony by Big Tech executives saying that they don’t tip the scales in the Democrats favor should be treated as lying to Congress. That’s because that’s what it is.