Archive for the ‘Battleground States’ Category

Democrats know that winning the White House in 2020 is difficult if they get swept in Florida, Ohio and Pennsylvania. At this point in the campaign, Ohio is pretty much out of the Democrats’ reach so let’s scratch that state off the battleground list. Pennsylvania is still definitely a toss-up state, which brings us to Florida.

Andrew Gillum, the Democrats’ gubernatorial candidate, “has played a vocal role in registering voters in Florida through 2019.” Despite that high-profile help in registering voters, “state data shows Republicans in the swing state are far outpacing Democrats when it comes to the raw number of registered voters. Between January and September 2019, the latest month for which data is available, Republicans registered a net 23,084 new voters in the state, compared to 10,731 Democrats, according to the Florida Division of Elections.”

Though those are impressive statistics important to Florida, this is important nationwide:


When Democrats argue, as they did at last week’s debate, that the Trump-GOP economy helps only the 1%, this refutes the Democrats’ lies. Listening to this BS is difficult:

President Trump isn’t just rallying his base. He’s growing that base through one great policy after another. Policies that are lifting African-Americans out of poverty will extend President Trump’s base. The people benefiting from President Trump’s policies know that the stuff Biden is peddling is BS. Without a coherent economic message, the Democrats are sunk, in Florida and elsewhere.

Democrats will undoubtedly spend lots of money trying to win Florida. That’s a losing strategy because of this:


The DNC literally can’t afford to get into a spending fight with the RNC. That’s a losing fight if ever there was one. At this point, the Trump-RNC campaign is hitting on all cylinders. Here’s proof:


Adding 600,000 new small dollar donors equals 600,000 additional GOP voters. Whatever genius thought it smart to impeach President Trump is likely looking for a new job right now. That wasn’t the brightest decision in presidential campaign history.

The Democrats were already fighting an uphill fight to unseat President Trump. That’s thanks to the power of incumbency and a great economy. With Democrats moving even further left and with them impeaching President Trump with just hearsay testimony, Democrats just made that steep hill a little more difficult to climb.

During a week in which House Democrats impeached President Trump, Democrats also all-but-officially signed the political death certificates for their members who represent Trump districts. House Democrats then passed President Trump’s USMCA trade agreement, then passed the bill funding government for FY2020. Included in that bill was funding for President Trump’s wall and a 3.1% pay raise for the military.

After impeaching President Trump but before passing USMCA, Nancy Pelosi decided that she’d make Democrats look utterly unserious. She did that by telling reporters that she wouldn’t send the articles of impeachment to the Senate. She said that despite telling We The People that President Trump had to be impeached and convicted immediately to protect national security and preserve our elections.

While Pelosi impeached President Trump, President Trump held a rally in Michigan. These rallies have been turned into entertainment/pep rallies as well as voter registration drive headquarters. At this week’s rally, 27% of the people who filled out voter registration forms switched from being Democrats. On the subject of voter registration drives, the rally in Sunrise, FL, was a huge success, registering 31,000 people, 30% of which used to be Democrats and 27% are Hispanics.

President Trump’s great week continued when Democrats held a presidential debate in LA. At the debate, the Democrats’ frontrunner was asked a question about energy policy. Here’s Mr. Biden’s reply:

MODERATOR: Would you be willing to sacrifice [economic growth in the energy sector] knowing potentially that it could displace maybe hundreds of thousands of blue-collar workers in the interest of a greener economy?
JOE: The answer is yes.

Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders were the only Democrats with a shot at winning Pennsylvania and Michigan. That opportunity disappeared when they said that they’d worship at the altar of Climate Change. Climate change and mining fit together like oil and water. If Democrats can’t flip Michigan and Pennsylvania back into the blue column, Democrats can’t win in 2020.

During the impeachment debate and vote, the Trump campaign raised $5,000,000:

President Trump’s re-election campaign raked in $5 million in donations Wednesday, the day the House of Representatives voted to impeach him, his campaign manager said.

“Incredible fundraising numbers!” manager Brad Parscale tweeted. “[Trump] has raised over [$5 million] (still growing) today as Americans use their wallet to show support against Pelosi’s impeachment hoax!” he added.

This isn’t just people supporting a candidate they like. This impeachment has fired up Trump supporters. To them, this is personal now. When independents saw the railroad job being pushed onto President Trump, they reacted.

Next November, the Republicans’ fantastic week will come to fruition.

This USA Today poll proves that the average voter has figured it out. The article itself proves that the MSM hasn’t figured it out.

One of the first results reported shows that “In the poll, sentiments divided along predictable partisan lines. Republicans by an overwhelming 89%-9% oppose a Senate vote that would remove Trump from office; Democrats by 81%-15% support it. Independents by 52%-41% oppose it.” It isn’t exactly predictable that independents oppose impeachment by 11 points.

Later, the poll reports “Men oppose convicting Trump by close to 2-1, 62%-33%. Women by double digits support a conviction, 57%-40%.” It isn’t surprising that there’s a gender gap. What’s surprising is that men oppose President Trump’s conviction by 29 points. That’s a huge gap that favors Republicans bigtime. Despite that, here’s what USA Today says about the gender gaps:

That could signal political turbulence ahead for the GOP, which struggled to hold the support of female voters in last year’s midterm elections.

It isn’t disputable that women abandoned Republicans by a wide margin. This graphic tells the tale, though:

In 2018, Democrats had a 19-point advantage with women while Republicans held a 4-point lead with men. With all due respect to the journalists 4-point gap with men in 2018 vs. a 29-point gap in 2020 is a pretty significant difference. Based on 2018 exit polling and this USA Today polling, 2020 will be nothing like 2018. This paragraph from this article should frighten Democrats:

According to the survey, Trump would beat former Vice-President Joe Biden by three points, Sen. Bernie Sanders by five points, and Sen. Elizabeth Warren by six points.

Additionally, President Trump defeats Bloomberg by 9 points and Buttigieg by 10 points. It’s worth noting that this is a national poll. Prior to this poll, the only polling that showed President Trump ahead were battleground state polls.

That isn’t insignificant because we have a federal election, not a national election. Polling that shows President Trump leading in battleground states are most important. National polling that shows President Trump leading the top 5 Democrats should frighten the daylights out of Democrats. Perhaps this graphic tells the story better:

The people have figured it out that impeachment is just the latest Democrat-led temper tantrum. Democrats should accept the fact that they won’t defeat President Trump and they won’t impeach and convict him, either. That’s the political reality of this situation.

One thing that Brad Parscale isn’t getting credit for is his installing efficiencies into the Trump campaign. That will change as more information (like this) gets out: Dr. Gina Loudon was at President Trump’s rally in Sunrise, FL, Tuesday night. She’s the national co-chair of the Women For Trump campaign. Dr. Gina reported that Republicans registered 31,000 voters at Tuesday night’s rally. First, that’s a staggering total. I’m certain that President Trump is the only candidate in this race who could accomplish anything like this, mostly because there isn’t a Democrat in the race who can attract that big of a crowd. It’s important to remind people that Sunrise, FL is in Broward County, one of the bluest counties in Florida.

Next, Dr. Gina reported that 30% of the registrations were Democrats who switched allegiances to the GOP. Again, that’s an astronomical number, one that certainly frightens Democrats. Third, Dr. Gina reported that 27% of the registrations were Hispanics.

This isn’t just happening in Sunrise. It’s happening at each of President Trump’s rallies. They’ve registered voters in El Paso, TX, Houston, TX, Orlando, FL, and New Mexico. If these attendees of Trump rallies turn into votes, which a high percentage will do, it’ll be a game-changer. Think of all of the new Republicans that this efficiency will create. That isn’t good news for Democrats.

Brad Todd was on The Story Wednesday night. He’s the co-author of The Great Revolt: Inside the Populist Coalition Reshaping American Politics along with Salena Zito. He told guest-host Ed Henry that Democrats aren’t even trying to win back the blue collar workers they lost to Trump in 2016. If that’s true, then Democrats face an uphill fight in 2020.

Finally, there’s the Trump campaign’s minority outreach program. Based on multiple recent polling, President Trump’s approval rating is improving with minorities. He’s at 34% with African-Americans in a recent Rasmussen poll. He’s at 34.5% with African-Americans in a recent Emerson poll.

If Democrats aren’t attempting to win back blue collar voters, which appears to be the case, and if President Trump is making inroads into minority communities, which appears to be happening, then Pennsylvania and Michigan would be uphill fights for Democrats. Factor in the Trump/RNC cash advantage and the Democrats’ hill gets even harder to climb. Factor in the great economy and that hill might look more like Kilimanjaro than foothill.

Something that the MSM, aka the Agenda Media, doesn’t understand is how detached the polling is from Trump’s real life army. Last fall, I read every one of Salena Zito’s articles from states like Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Virginia and Michigan. (The first 2 states, like the last 2 states, were supposedly part of Hillary’s blue firewall.)

Thursday night in Huntington, WVA, President Trump held a rally that was high on energy, predictable in content and troubling for the Democratic Party. Despite the spate of recent negative polling, President Trump’s army hasn’t wavered in their support of him. Here’s why that should frighten Democrats. If Democrats can’t reconnect with blue collar voters, they’ll lose in 2020 by a bigger margin than Hillary lost by in 2016.

Tip O’Neill famously said that “all politics is local.” That’s definitely true. In the small towns in northern Pennsylvania, Ohio’s Mahoning Valley, Michigan and Wisconsin, blue collar voters are seeing the Trump economic plan pay dividends. In Pennsylvania, they’re creating tons of mining jobs. In Ohio, they’re creating steel industry jobs. In Wisconsin, Foxconn is creating high-paying manufacturing jobs. It isn’t likely that Democrats will flip those states back into their column anytime soon.

President Trump got lots of applause when, early in his speech, he said “We are putting our coal miners back to work. We’ve ended the war on beautiful clean coal. We’ve stopped the EPA intrusion. American coal exports are already up — think of this — American exports of coal are already up more than 60% this year.”

While he said this to a packed auditorium in Huntington, WVA, rest assured that coal miners in Pennsylvania and Ohio heard President Trump’s message and applauded. Watch President Trump’s speech here:

Charles Krauthammer said that the speech wasn’t particularly memorable but it was still important because it sent the message that he still commands a massive army of supporters. That’s totally true.

Last year, faux reporters were appalled when then-candidate Trump said that “You know what else they say about my people? The polls, they say I have the most loyal people. Did you ever see that? Where I could stand in the middle of Fifth Avenue and shoot somebody and I wouldn’t lose any voters, okay? It’s like incredible.” While he said it rather inartfully, there’s little doubt that he hasn’t lost much support. President Trump has figured out something that most politicians haven’t. He’s figured out that keeping his biggest promises engenders steadfast loyalty.

Until something substantive happens to dramatically change the electorate’s perspective, I’ll continue believing that Democrats will have an uphill fight in 2020.

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Over the past few days, liberals have repeatedly quoted the phrase “that the office of President will never fall to the lot of any man who is not in an eminent degree endowed with the requisite qualifications.” Early in John Conyers’ op-ed, the aging Democrat, cites that quote, too.

What hasn’t gotten discussed is who determines what defines those “requisite qualifications” are. In this instance, Democrats insist that Donald Trump is lacking in those amorphous qualifications. That’s a rather risky proposition. Democrats literally insisted that Hillary was the most overqualified presidential candidate in history. Forgive me if I don’t trust their opinion, especially after watching Mrs. Clinton get a US ambassador killed by reducing the security forces in the country.

Forgive me if I think that Mrs. Clinton was the ultimate corrupt politician. As Secretary of State, Mrs. Clinton operated a pay-for-play scheme with her family’s foundation. I’m fairly certain that Alexander Hamilton didn’t think being corrupt was a “requisite qualification” for being commander-in-chief.

Since his election victory, President-Elect Trump has put together one of the most impressive cabinets in US history:

That suggests that he’s more than qualified to be this nation’s chief executive.

What’s interesting is that Democrats have only proposed eliminating the Electoral College. They haven’t talked about reforming the way states award their delegates. It isn’t surprising why. If electoral votes were awarded proportionally instead of on a winner-take-all basis, Trump would’ve won decisively.

Wouldn’t you love hearing Democrats explain why they’re opposed to such a reform? Recently and temporarily, Democrats have praised the principles of federalism. Those appeals are dishonest. Democrats’ love of federalism is as authentic as an atheist’s appreciation of Jesus.

It’s time for Democrats to stop whining and accept the fact that their nominee was a corrupt, cold woman who ran one of the worst campaigns in history. That’s why she got trounced in the vast majority of battleground states.

Last Tuesday night, Donald Trump was given a mandate on multiple issues. One of the issues that he received a mandate on was energy. In state after state, especially in the battleground states, Mr. Trump tapped into the frustration felt by blue collar voters. These voters have frequently been classified as angry white voters by the MSM. Whether that’s an intentional mischaracterization or whether it’s a simple mistake, it isn’t accurate.

These voters told the nation that they were tired of Democrats hurting coal mining by constantly siding with the environmental activist wing of the Democratic Party. In Rust Belt state after Rust Belt state, voters voted Donald Trump in overwhelming numbers. While there aren’t exit polls highlighting this statistic, there’s a different yardstick to measure that mandate. It’s called voter turnout. In the Great Lakes states, the proof was obvious from the start of the night.

Another mandate that voters gave to Mr. Trump and Republicans was on the issue of health care reform. Here in Minnesota, Republicans increased the size of their majority in the House of Representatives and flipped the Senate because of the MNsure/ACA crisis in the state and because of increased turnout in rural Minnesota thanks to Donald Trump.

Another way of judging the size of the mandate is that Trump won 30 of the 50 states. Of the battleground states, Mrs. Clinton won 3 (New Hampshire, Nevada and Virginia) states with a total of 23 electoral votes while Mr. Trump won 6 (Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, North Carolina and Florida) with a total of 108 electoral votes.

President Trump will implement his policies because Democrats are in disarray and because the issues he’s fighting for are popular. Think of it this way. Would you want to be one of the 9 Democratic senators in states that Trump won after voting against fixing the ACA? There’s a term for that. That’s called political suicide.

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The big story from Tuesday night was that Republicans pretty much had their way with Democrats once the urban votes were counted. Donald Trump was on the verge of victory seemingly for hours. Minutes ago, he won Pennsylvania, officially giving him 278 electoral votes. That’s without adding Arizona’s 11 electoral votes (Trump leads there 49.7%-45.4%) and Michigan’s 16 electoral votes (Trump leads there 48.1%-46.8%). If Trump wins those states, that puts him at 305 electoral votes.

Though Trump’s victory was the night’s biggest news, it wasn’t the only good news for Republicans. At this point, Republicans have lost a net of 1 seat in the US Senate with 2 races heading for runoffs. That gives Republicans a minimum of 51 seats in the Senate. Add to that the fact that Republicans easily held onto their majority in the House and you’ve got a banner night for the RNC and America’s blue collar workers.

This means that Merrick Garland won’t be confirmed as the next Supreme Court justice. In fact, the next question will be whether President Obama pulls the nomination or whether Garland withdraws his name from consideration.

Throughout the night, commentators kept saying that Trump had a path to victory but that it was a narrow, uphill path. After Trump won the must-win states of Florida, North Carolina and Ohio, those commentators said that Trump had done what he had to do before mentioning the fact that Mr. Trump hadn’t yet penetrated the Democrats’ Blue Wall. That commentary disappeared when Wisconsin fell. Suddenly, those commentators realized that Mrs. Clinton was on the defensive. They realized that she was suddenly in the position of needing to run the table to win the White House.

By the time they called Pennsylvania, the writing was on the wall. Reality had started sinking in. Most commentators in the network studios understood that Donald Trump was all but officially the president-elect of the United States. This is how Fox News called the race over:

The incoming Trump administration and the Republican House and Senate now have a mandate to get things done. The first 100 days of the Trump administration figure to be busy. They’ll have to nominate the man or woman who will replace Justice Scalia. They’ll want to work with Congress on building the wall. Hopefully, they’ll repeal and replace Obamacare. They’ll want to get started with reforming the tax code, too.

Those things wouldn’t have been possible if not for the Republicans’ big night on the nation’s biggest stage.

This article raises an interesting possibility. They’re raising the possibility that Colorado might give their electoral votes to Donald Trump. What caught my attention was the opening paragraphs of the article.

The opening paragraph said “Republicans took the lead in early voting in Colorado at the end of the day Friday and held the advantage through the weekend despite robust Democratic get-out-the-vote efforts.” The second paragraph said “The latest early voting numbers released Monday morning show registered Republicans cast 652,380 ballots compared to 645,020 registered Democrats — a 7,360 vote GOP advantage. The breakdown looks like this: 35.2 percent Republican, 34.8 percent Democrat and 28.5 percent unaffiliated.”

FYI- This reporting is being reported by the Denver Post.

The D-Post is also asking if Democrats took Colorado for granted, adding that the “Trump campaign is emphasizing Colorado as evidenced by the candidate’s rally Saturday in Denver — his third visit in eight days to the state. Republicans also are outspending Democrats when it comes to television advertising in the state, according to media trackers, which runs counter to most media markets.”

Colorado’s importance increases if this report is right:

Obviously, it isn’t important if Mrs. Clinton wins Florida or North Carolina. Based on the last polls, it’s definitely possible for Mrs. Clinton to win those states. I don’t think it’s likely that Mrs. Clinton wins both states but it’s possible. If Trump sweeps Florida, North Carolina and Colorado, though, something that’s viewed as possible, then holds the other red states, Trump’s president-elect.

If I had to guess, which is all that anyone can do at this point, I’d predict Mrs. Clinton winning but by a razor-thin margin in a hand-full of battleground states. Still, I’d be lying if I said Mr. Trump doesn’t have a path, albeit uphill, to victory.

The prediction that I won’t hesitate in making, though, is that Mrs. Clinton won’t have a governing mandate. Mrs. Clinton’s chief campaign message has been that she isn’t Donald Trump. She’s run a personality-driven campaign that’s been essentially substance-free. Yes, she’s played Santa Claus with free college tuition in her attempt to win over Bernie Sanders’ voters but nobody thinks she’s stupid enough to push that initiative except during the mid-term elections.

According to the Agenda Media, Hillary Clinton mopped the proverbial floor with Donald Trump’s behind. The storyline connecting all of the stories is that she was well-prepared and that she was masterful at getting Trump to take the bait time after time.

That’s the traditional angle, though. It’s the conventional wisdom angle. According to this article, though, voters in swing states might have a different opinion. It’s telling that the article notices “Kae Roberts and Jay Eardly were leaning toward Hillary Clinton before Monday night’s debate. By the end, they had both pulled away. John Kokos and Hank Federal were undecided going in, potential Clinton backers. By the end, they’d ruled her out.”

Any night that voters say that they’re going to vote for you, it’s a good thing. It’s also good when voters rule out your opponent. That’s what appears to be happening in the post-debate aftermath. That isn’t to say that Trump turned in a masterful performance. He didn’t. He didn’t capitalize on the opportunities that Mrs. Clinton gave him often enough.

Democrats were switching allegiances in Pennsylvania, too:

Ken Reed sat down at the main bar of the Tin Lizzy tavern with two things in mind: to dig into the tavern’s oversize cheese steak, and watch the presidential debate. “I am hungry and undecided, in that order,” he said, digging into the savory dish in a bar that dates back to 1746.

Kady Letoksy, a paralegal by day, a waitress and bartender at night at the Tin Lizzy, sat beside him. At 28, she has never voted before, and she is now thinking it might be a good idea to start. Letosky entered the evening undecided in a town that is heavily Democratic in registration. Her sister and father are on opposite sides of the political aisle. Donald “Trump had the upper hand this evening,” she said, citing his command of the back-and-forth between him and Hillary Clinton.

Reed, 35, is a registered Democrat and small businessman. “By the end of the debate, Clinton never said a thing to persuade me that she had anything to offer me or my family or my community,” he said, sitting at the same bar that has boasted local icons as regulars, such as the late Fred Rogers, and Arnold Palmer, who had his own stash of PM Whiskey hidden behind newer bottles of whiskey for his regular visits. “Have to say Trump had the edge this evening, he came out swinging but also talked about specifics on jobs and the economy,” Reed said.

Trump’s goal for the debates is to help him win the election. As such, the debates are a tool to be used to help him win. Viewed in that light, Trump definitely benefited from last night’s debate. It isn’t as much a matter of winning or losing as much as it’s about whether you benefited from it.

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