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Watching all the ads being run by Nancy Pelosi’s PAC, the Franken campaign, the Nolan campaign and all the anti-business rhetoric coming from the Dayton campaign, DFL chairman Ken Martin and other anti-business parasites, there’s only one conclusion you can draw. The DFL and its candidates hate employers. Joe Soucheray’s column highlights the DFL’s silliness perfectly:

It’s to the point of comedy that the national Democratic Party has raced to Minnesota to help Nolan out with television ads that feature yachts and private airplanes and white sand beaches. I guess the voter is supposed to believe that Mills sits around all day and has grapes fed to him as he pages through the Neiman Marcus Christmas catalog pining for a new Maserati Ghibli S Q4.

Whether it’s Nancy Pelosi’s superPAC or Rick Nolan’s campaign, the hard left’s disdain for companies is unmistakable. It’s in each of their ads against Stewart Mills. What’s most appalling is that the DFL’s agenda doesn’t have a thing in it that says they’re pro-capitalism. In fact, when the DFL held their state convention, Iron Range Democrats wanted the state party to ad a simple sentence to their party’s platform. That simple sentence was to say that the DFL supports mining.

After hours of negotiations, aka Metrocrats intimidating the Iron Range delegation, that simple sentence was dropped because Alida Messinger declared that statement was too controversial. Nolan isn’t the only 1970s reject that thinks companies are evil:

The Franken camp says that as an investment banker, McFadden has brokered the sales of companies that have resulted in the loss of jobs. Well, that can be true in some cases. In other cases, there will be a gain of jobs. Besides, once a company is bought or sold, what does McFadden have to do with it? The Franken camp also insists that McFadden has been involved with companies that have committed the mortal sin of tax inversion by moving their headquarters overseas. No. McFadden’s company represented a foreign company being bought, not the U.S. company moving abroad. That’s business, however unfamiliar Franken might be to business.

In Franken’s thinking, the problem isn’t that the tax code is filled with special favors. It’s that small businesses, aka the rich, aren’t paying a high enough tax rate. The thing is that Franken and Nolan haven’t started a business that requires sound judgment. That’s why they don’t know that many of these small businesses owners work 60-75 hours/week to build a business, paying their employees first, then paying their bills before they can start funding their retirement and their kids’ college education.

After sweating through tough times before getting to the point of profitability, then idiots like Dayton, Franken and Nolan accuse them of being greedy and of “not paying their fair share.”

The truth is that Stewart Mills and Mike McFadden have done more to improve middle class families’ lives in 5 years than Dayton, Franken and Nolan have done in a lifetime. Long-winded politicians haven’t paid for their employees’ health insurance or contributed to their employees’ retirement accounts or paid them a good wage that put a roof over their employees’ families’ heads. Stewart Mills and Mike McFadden have.

When Dayton, Franken and Nolan do that for a generation, then I’ll listen, not a minute before.

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Recently, I got another smear campaign mailer from the DFL smearing Jim Knoblach. It isn’t shocking that the DFL is into smearing Republicans. It’s that the DFL’s mailer has a picture of a senior citizen with the caption “Tell Jim Knoblach to keep his hands off our Social Security and Medicare.”

It’s painfully obvious that the DFL knows that state legislators don’t have anything to do with Medicare or Social Security. Just because the DFL is without character and can’t be shamed because they don’t have a conscience, that doesn’t mean that they’re stupid.

They’re just disgustingly unprincipled and utterly without virtue.

While it’s true that Jim Knoblach supported giving people the option of putting a portion of their FICA taxes into a government-approved equity account when he ran for Congress in 2006, that’s utterly irrelevant in this race. Jim Knoblach, if he’s elected, will never cast a vote on Social Security or Medicare because they’re federal programs.

This DFL’s intent with this mailer is to scare senior citizens into voting for Zach Dorholt. If’s apparent that the DFL doesn’t care that it’s fearmongering at its worst. It’s important to remember what Howard Dean said after being elected chair of the DNC:

It’s a battle between good and evil…and we’re the good.

In Dean’s mind, the ends justified the means. If that meant smearing people with lies, that’s the path he’d take without hesitation. That’s the mindset that Ken Martin brought with him from ABM to the DFL.

In Martin’s mind, the only thing that matters is winning elections and checking items off the DFL’s ideological checklist. It’s irrelevant if it helps Minnesotans. It’s only relevant if it makes their special interests’ lives better.

The DFL insists that it’s for the little guy. That’s BS and it’s verifiable. The Metrocrat wing of the DFL, made up mostly by plutocrats and elitists, has done everything to prevent PolyMet from getting built. If the DFL cared about Iron Range voters, they wouldn’t say that building the mine is important but dragging the regulatory review for 9 years is more important.

If the DFL cared about the little guy, they wouldn’t have shoved forced unionization onto child care providers.

Zach Dorholt voted for the forced unionization of child care providers. He voted for major business-to-business sales tax increases and the Senate Office Building. After the session, he caught hell from St. Cloud businesses for creating these new taxes. These businesses lobbied him hard during the session. He ignored them then. It wasn’t until after the session that he started listening to these businesses.

Dorholt is chair of the House Higher Ed Committee. That’s a position of authority yet he hasn’t lifted a finger to investigate the wasteful spending at MnSCU’s Central Office nor has he looked into the financial mismanagement at SCSU. Despite the fact that SCSU is facing $8,000,000-$10,000,000 of budget cuts this year and despite the fact that the Potter administration hasn’t published a budget report yet, Zach Dorholt hasn’t looked into these issues.

All he cares about is whether he can report that he increased spending on Higher Education.

How does that qualify as helping the little guy or middle class families? That’s before asking Mr. Dorholt how the Dayton-Dorholt-DFL budget is creating part-time, low wage jobs helps grow the economy from the middle class out?

The truth is that the DFL doesn’t care about prosperity. They don’t care about great jobs throughout the state. They don’t care if public institutions foolishly spend the taxpayers’ money. How dare they send out mailers that frighten senior citizens while smearing a great policymaker.

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Since their foundation, the Alliance for a Better Minnesota has specialized in dishonesty. In fact, they’ve been one of the most dishonest political actors in Minnesota politics. Their latest ad is titled Impossible:

Here’s the transcript of that ad:

My kids and I lived on minimum wage. It was nearly impossible to get by. But TEA Party Republican Jeff Johnson says if he’s elected governor, he’ll find a bill to reduce the minimum wage. Johnson’s plan would hurt over 350,000 Minnesota workers. Johnson opposes raising the minimum wage but he supports tax breaks for big corporations. Jeff Johnson has the wrong priorities for Minnesota.

This ad isn’t totally dishonest but it’s definitely deceptive. When the woman said that Jeff Johnson opposed raising the minimum wage, ABM cited House Journal page 3417…from May, 2005. When she talks about “tax breaks for big corporations,” she’s citing House Journal page 3934…from May, 2005.

What this young lady didn’t mention in talking about politicians supporting “tax breaks for big corporations” is that TEA Party Republicans weren’t the only people to vote for “tax breaks for big corporations.” Democrats like Paul Thissen, Nora Slawik, Pat Opatz, Denise Dittrich, Ron Erhardt, Bev Scalze, Katie Sieben and Ann Lenczewski voted for “tax breaks for big corporations,” too. Thissen, of course, is the current Speaker of the House while Katie Sieben is Gov. Dayton’s commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development, aka DEED.

The first thrust of this ad is that Jeff Johnson’s opposition to raising the minimum wage makes him unfit for office while the other thrust of this ad is that people voting for “tax breaks for big corporations” is a trouble-making arch-conservative. Apparently, ABM either didn’t do their homework or they chose to omit the fact that “tax breaks for big corporations” had solid bipartisan support. (It’s likely the latter because a) it doesn’t fit their narrative and b) ABM isn’t sloppy with their research.)

What’s sad, though, is that this woman apparently was stuck in a minimum wage job for a lengthy period of time. Minnesota’s economy should do better than that. The fact that 350,000 people are trapped in minimum wage jobs is an indictment of the Dayton-DFL economy.

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Two weeks ago, I published this post that highlighted this video, which focused on education:

Here’s the transcript of that video:

I think a lot of Minnesotans don’t know what Jeff Johnson stands for. It seems like schools are not Jeff Johnson’s priority. Jeff Johnson cut early childhood spending. That really bothers me. Any cuts to that would be devastating for our family. Our kids are our future so how could you do that? I would hate to see Minnesota take a step backwards in education. Students in the state of Minnesota deserve far better than that. I trust Mark Dayton. We think Gov. Dayton is the right choice for moving Minnesota’s schools forward.

Now that ad, which is paid for by the Alliance for More Powerful Unions, aka the Alliance for a Better Minnesota, is running constantly. I said in the original post that everything in the ad was about spending. It definitely didn’t focus on teacher accountability.

I doubt that many Minnesotans object to the thought of having qualified teachers in every high school classroom in Minnesota. The only people who’d object to that are Education Minnesota, Gov. Dayton and Zach Dorholt. That isn’t a cheapshot, either. In 2011, the GOP legislature passed a bill requiring high school math and science teachers to pass a basic skills test. Gov. Dayton signed that bill. After the 2012 election, and with an all-DFL government in St. Paul, Education Minnesota called in their biggest chit. Education Minnesota told the DFL legislature and Gov. Dayton that the basic skills test had to be repealed. ASAP.

Despite their public statements, Education Minnesota isn’t about putting highly qualified teachers in every classroom. Education Minnesota is about representing the best interests of their members, nothing more, nothing less.

The tip that voters should notice is the couple saying that they trust Gov. Dayton. What they’re saying is that they’re either steadfastly pro-union or they’re totally uninformed voters who’ve bought the Dayton campaign’s spin.

Though the ad touts Gov. Dayton’s support of Education Minnesota, it could tout Zach Dorholt’s support of Education Minnesota. When it comes to supporting everything on the public employees unions’ wish list, nobody gets higher grades than Zach Dorholt. Or Gov. Dayton. Or Speaker Thissen. Or Mike Nelson. Or any other DFL legislator.

The reality is that the DFL legislature is a subsidiary of the special interests.

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I just published this post to highlight the DCCC’s campaign ad smearing Stewart Mills. Here’s the centerpiece of the DCCC’s smear campaign against Mills:

“Stewart Mills III caught a big inheritance and a job at the family business that pay half-a-million year. But in Congress, Mills will leave you on the hook for higher taxes because Mills opposed tax cuts for the middle class – even as he wants to give another huge tax break to millionaires like himself.”

Next, let’s compare that DCCC lie against Stewart Mills with the lie the DCCC is telling about Torrey Westrom:

“Westrom led the charge to shutdown Minnesota’s government. Why? Because he wouldn’t let go of tax breaks for millionaires.

Here’s Poligraph’s verdict against the DCCC’s lie against Torrey Westrom:

The 2011 government shutdown happened because Gov. Mark Dayton and the Republican controlled Legislature could not agree on a budget to close the state’s $5 billion deficit. Dayton wanted to raise taxes on Minnesota’s top earners (which he did in the last legislative session), but Republicans objected.

That’s true but incomplete. Poligraph’s verdict left out the fact that Republicans were prepared to pass a lights-on bill that would’ve avoided a shutdown while Republicans negotiated a budget solution with Gov. Dayton. Poligraph’s verdict also left out the fact that the budget Gov. Dayton signed after the longest shutdown in state history was the budget he could’ve signed at the end of the regular legislative session.

Further, the budget that the GOP legislature passed never, at any point, included tax cuts for any income group. PERIOD.

The DCCC’s ad is a lie. They’ve done the research on the 2011 budget that Gov. Dayton signed. Their researchers kept track of the bills and amendments that Republicans offered. I triple-dog dare the DCCC to cite the HF/SF number or the amendment offered by Torrey Westrom or anyone in the House or Senate that would’ve cut millionaire’s taxes.

They won’t accept that offer because they know a ‘millionaire’s tax cut’ bill doesn’t exist, especially in Minnesota.

Whether it’s the DCCC, ABM or another of the DFL ‘alphabets’, the script remains the same. The script isn’t the script if it doesn’t lie in accusing Republicans of wanting to cut millionaires’ taxes. I can’t say that that accusation is fictional because the definition of fiction is “something feigned, invented, or imagined; a made-up story.” The DCCC doesn’t engage in fiction. It just lies through its teeth. Here’s the definition of lies:

a false statement made with deliberate intent to deceive; an intentional untruth; a falsehood.

That’s what the DCCC and ABM do with frightening regularity.

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According to MPR’s article, the DCCC’s latest ad attacking Stewart Mills doesn’t get much right:

The closest the DCCC ad comes to correct is in its claims about Mills personal wealth.

After that, the DCCC gets its facts wrong. Mills said he opposed the Cash for Clunkers program, but that has nothing to do with opposing middle class tax cuts. And while Mills has talked around the issue of tax reform, giving few details on what he would do, the DCCC makes some assumptions about how Mills would vote on tax cuts for the wealthy if he were elected to Congress.

For leaving out critical details, this ad is misleading at best.

That’s MPR’s verdict. Here’s their unabridged version:

In the DCCC’s latest ad, a Mills stand-in hops on his yacht, and motors off into the sunset:

“Stewart Mills III caught a big inheritance and a job at the family business that pay half-a-million year. But in Congress, Mills will leave you on the hook for higher taxes because Mills opposed tax cuts for the middle class – even as he wants to give another huge tax break to millionaires like himself.”
This ad enters rough waters.

The Evidence

Mills is the Vice President of Mills Fleet Farm, his family’s business where Mills has spent his career. According to financial disclosure documents, Mills was paid more than $500,000 to do that job in 2013, and has company assets into the tens-of-millions.

To back up its claim that Mills opposes tax cuts for the middle class, the DCCC points to a January 2014 Start Tribune profile of the 8th district race. Mills told the Star Tribune that the Cash for Clunkers program, which paid people to turn in their old gas guzzlers, was “another failed example of Washington, D.C., trying to legislate the free market.”

What does Cash for Clunkers have to do with middle class tax cuts? Nothing.

Whether it’s the DCCC, the Alliance for a Better Minnesota or Nancy Pelosi’s House Majority PAC, the script doesn’t change. Candidate fill-in-the-blank wants to give millionaires tax breaks while voting against tax cuts for the middle class. The other thing that doesn’t change is whether it’s a lie. Poligraph is right. The DCCC ad gets it right that Stewart Mills has personal wealth. After that, they’re pretty much lying through their teeth. So is Rick Nolan, who lifted a big part of the DCCC’s script and put it into his ad attacking Stewart Mills.

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Yesterday, Martin launched a hissy fit yesterday that would make a 5-year-old proud. Here’s the heart of Martin’s histrionics:

On Tuesday, Martin also accused Johnson of being disingenuous about his connection to the Tea Party.

“This is a question of character,” said Martin. Martin said Johnson was trying to “reinvent” himself post-primary. “It’s the hypocrisy. It’s the lying. It’s the misleading,” Martin said.

As proof, Martin shared a video of Johnson saying on Tuesday that he had not asked for the Tea Party’s endorsement and questioning whether the Tea Party even endorses. The DFL compared that to a video of Johnson at an April Tea Party meeting in which he says, “I would be truly honored to earn your support and endorsement in this race.”

It’s utterly disgusting to hear Martin and the DFL to lecture anyone on character. They’re the party that stole 11 Senate elections by breaking well-established campaign finance laws:

The Minnesota campaign finance agency on Tuesday slapped the Minnesota DFL Senate campaign with a $100,000 fine improperly coordinating 2012 campaign mailings with candidates.

The result of investigation and settlement talks that lasted more than a year, the fine is one of the largest ever levied in Minnesota for campaign violations. The penalty stems from candidates and the party committee violating rules that ban coordination between independent spending and what is controlled by a candidate.

How dare Martin now question Jeff Johnson’s character after turning a blind eye toward his party’s candidates breaking the law. In fact, Chairman Martin’s statement in the aftermath of this fine shouts that he isn’t a man of integrity:

“Ultimately, it is best to set this distraction aside and allow our members to focus on governing,” Martin said.

Chairman Martin dares challenge Jeff Johnson’s character after saying that intentionally breaking well-established campaign finance to steal elections is a “distraction”? That won’t cut it with me, Chairman Martin. Shame on you for saying that the stealing of 11 state senat elections is a “distraction.”

Ken Martin’s job this election is to distract attention away from the disastrous Dayton-DFL jobs creation statistics, the impending Dayton-DFL deficit, the DFL’s insistance on stopping mining and the continuing MNsure disaster. Thus far, he’s doing a terrible job of distracting attention away from those things.

These accusations are the just the latest attempt to pull attention away from Gov. Dayton’s inability to pay attention long enough to govern. That’s something Tom Horner highlighted in his endorsing statement:

Time and again, Mark Dayton has bucked responsibility for unpopular decisions or failures—how many times, for instance, have we heard Dayton say he didn’t know a provision was in a bill?

Gov. Dayton lost track of tons of things over the last 4 years. He forgot that he negotiated a sales tax on farm equipment repairs into the tax bill he signed into law. He forgot that he negotiated a personal seat license provision into the Vikings stadium bill that he signed. Gov. Dayton forgot that kids who mowed lawns on a weekly basis would have to pay sales tax on their earnings.

Finally, before he became DFL Chairman Martin, Ken Martin was part of the biggest smear campaign in Minnesota gubernatorial history. How dare he now accuse others of not being men of integrity.

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Friday, the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce endorsed Jeff Johnson in the Minnesota governor’s race:

In announcing the endorsement, the chamber’s interim president Bill Blazar said Johnson best represents the chamber’s “pro-business, pro-jobs agenda.” He said Dayton has enacted some of the highest tax rates in the country and increased labor regulations on employers that “seriously inhibits their ability to succeed and compete regionally and globally.”

Naturally, the Dayton campaign issued a statement on the Chamber’s endorsement:

Dayton campaign manager Katharine Tinucci said the governor wasn’t counting on the chamber’s backing despite participating in the screening.

“We’re going to continue to make the case that the progress that we’ve made the past four years has been good for workers, for working people, for families and for businesses,” she said.

TRANSLATION: We didn’t expect to get this endorsement because Gov. Dayton has waged a nonstop war against Minnesota’s small businesses:

After Teresa Bohnen pointed out concern by the business community on the impact of Governor Dayton’s 4th tier income tax on S-Corps I felt his response was disrespectful. He implied that businesses are “OK” with disparities in tax rates of businesses compared to middle income earners. He called the Minnesota Chamber destructive. Then he implied that Teresa and other businesses were unrealistic about the facts.

The fact that Gov. Dayton attempted to get the Chamber’s endorsement indicates he’s either delusional or desperate. When a former member of the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce board of directors says that Gov. Dayton called the Minnesota Chamber “destructive”, that’s a pretty good sign that he doesn’t stand a chance of getting the Chamber’s endorsement.

As for Ms. Tinucci’s statement that they’ve made progress the last 4 years that’ve “been good for workers, for working people, for families and for businesses,” she must be either a topnotch spinmeister or she’s using some expensive drugs. Gov. Dayton has fought the Chamber every step of the way. He’s raised taxes on the vast majority of the Chamber’s members. He signed, then repealed, some business-to-business sales taxes that would’ve caused iconic Minnesota companies like Red Wing Shoes, Polaris and DigiKey to move out of Minnesota.

That Gov. Dayton and his apologists in the DFL punditry have the audacity to say that they’ve passed bills that’ve made Minnesota’s economy better says that they’re willing to lie if that’s what’s needed to win this election.

Rural Minnesota’s economy isn’t great. It’s far from it. It’s worth noting that when the DFL insists that Minnesota’s economy is doing well, what they really mean is that the Twin Cities is doing ok. The dominant wing of the DFL is the Twin Cities Metrocrat. If they’re doing well, everything’s fantastic because, in their eyes, the Twin Cities, St. Cloud and Rochester are the only cities that matter.

There’s no doubt that the DFL/ABM/Team Dayton axis of spin will attack the Chamber’s endorsement of Jeff Johnson. ABM will undoubtedly characterize the Chamber as a bunch of rich, out-of-touch, white guys. While that’s likely to be their mantra, that isn’t reality.

The Chamber represents small businesses and entrepreneurs. What’s good for big corporations is entirely different than what’s good for small businesses. While both are established to make profits, that’s pretty much where the similarity ends.

Charlie Weaver’s Minnesota Business Partnership represents big corporations. Weaver’s sold out for his thirty pieces of silver. The Chamber, though, has sided with Jeff Johnson because he’d best represent the small businesses that drive all successful economies.

It’d be nice to have a governor who actually thought our economy extends beyond the Twin Cities. Gov. Dayton has shown he won’t pay attention to the economy outside the Metro.

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According to this article, the Alliance for a Better Minnesota, aka ABM, is a “liberal leaning group.” To be fair to the article, though, they took some pretty substantive swipes at ABM’s attacks against Jeff Johnson:

“Tea Party Republican Jeff Johnson voted to cut education, so he could give millions in tax breaks to big corporations,” the ad claims.

Contrary to what the ad claims, Johnson voted for an increase in K–12 education when he served in the Minnesota House, not a cut, according to final appropriations.

“I voted to increase education funding,” Johnson said. “We do this in government all the time when the increase isn’t as big as they wanted they say it was a cut.”

Here’s part of what Alisa Von Hagel, a professor of political science at the University of Wisconsin Superior, said about ABM’s ad:

The attack ad in its entirety is not grossly misleading or horribly inaccurate when compared to other television advertisements voters are being inundated with this election cycle.

That isn’t the same as saying it’s a true ad. It doesn’t even reach the point of being misleading. It’s like saying ‘Yeah, it’s dishonest but it isn’t as worthless as some of the vile crap that’s out there.’

Here’s something else that Dr. Von Hagel said about ABM’s ad:

“The most egregious part of the ad is this connection between education cuts and tax breaks for corporations which is not necessarily a claim there is any factual basis to make,” Von Hagel said.

Here’s the filthy part of the ad. Jeff Johnson didn’t cut K-12 spending. He voted to increase K-12 spending. He just didn’t increase K-12 spending as much as Education Minnesota wanted.

Gov. Dayton and the DFL tripped over themselves to increase spending on K-12 to the level that Education Minnesota asked for. That isn’t responsible government. That’s government of, by and for the special interests that fund DFL campaigns.

Bill Glahn is onto something about the ad, too (H/T: Mitch Berg):

Apparently the pejorative “Tea Party Republican” must test particularly well with low information voters. Or, perhaps its use in the ad is a sign the Democrats are concerned about turning out their base in an off-year election.

Ms. Livermore makes the dubious claim that Johnson “cut education by over $500 million” back in 2003, and then gave that money to corporations in 2005. Keep in mind that a similar ABM ad was judged “Misleading” by Minnesota Public Radio (of all places) for making those exact same claims. [The bill Johnson voted for in 2003 actually increased (rather than cut) public school spending.]

No, the real lie in the ad comes from the “appeal to authority” of having an ordinary “classroom teacher” attack Johnson’s education policy. According to her LinkedIn profile, Ms. Livermore served on the governing board of the teachers’ union Education Minnesota from 2004 to 2007. [By the way, she spells the word “education” incorrectly on her profile.]

Bill should cut Ms. Livermore some slack on the spelling. Chances are she attended a public school so what can you expect?

The point of the ad is to depict Ms. Livermore as just a concerned teacher. She definitely doesn’t fit that description after serving on Education Minnesota’s governing board.

This is just another bit of proof that ABM, which is the DFL’s messaging center, isn’t interested in informing voters. Their mission is to win voters over with whatever means are available. If that means lying or intentionally misleading, then that’s what ABM will do.

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This video is just another example of how Education Minnesota and the Alliance for a Better Minnesota can’t resist lying about Republicans:

The “cutting education to pay for tax breaks for big corporations” storyline was used against Tom Emmer in 2010. Back then, KTSP and FactCheck.org rated that ad as false. That’s because they’re polite. I’ll just state that they’re lying. It’s been proven false. Further, they knew it was false when they said it. That makes it a lie.

Like the DFL, ABM doesn’t have a positive agenda. Admittedly, they’ve lied about Minnesota’s economy, saying that Minnesota “is working again.” They said that despite the fact that Minnesota’s job creation has ground to a screeching halt, creating a pathetic 2,900 jobs this year. That’s right. This year, not this month. That isn’t a typo.

I wrote here that Gov. Dayton admitted that the MNsure rollout was a disaster, though he insists that it’s improving with each day. I wrote this article to highlight the fact that MNsure will be a major headache for years to come. That isn’t just my opinion. That’s the conclusion DeLoitte reached in their investigation.

Yes, Jeff Johnson voted for some unpopular things. He didn’t vote for “tax breaks for big corporations,” though. That’s part of ABM’s web of lies. If they were forced to tell the truth, 90% of their content for their ads would disappear. The best way to determine if ABM is lying is to determine if their lips are moving. If their spinmeister’s lips are moving, then it’s almost a certainty that they’re lying.

This is how bad MNsure still is:

During the assessment, 47 of the 73 sub-functions addressed were found either to be absent or not functioning as expected.

Two-thirds of the vital sub-functions either don’t exist or don’t work.

Gov. Dayton and the DFL can’t stand up to ABM, either. That’s because the DFL is funded by the same special interests that fund ABM. Specifically, the DFL is funded by Alida Messinger and the public employee unions. That’s who funds ABM, too.

That means Gov. Dayton and the DFL can’t call ABM out even if they wanted to. Then again, Gov. Dayton and the DFL don’t want to because the only thing they care about is winning at all costs.

If that means breaking the law, the DFL is fine with that. In fact, the DFL has broken the law, after which Ken Martin, the chair of the DFL, insisted that breaking the law was “a distraction“:

DFL lawmakers disagreed with the board’s ruling said that they are glad to put the matter to rest.

“Ultimately, it is best to set this distraction aside and allow our members to focus on governing,” DFL Party Chairman Ken Martin said.

It’s worth noting that Ken Martin was an integral part of ABM before Alida Messinger announced that she’d picked him as the next DFL chairman after she pushed Brian Melendez out the door.

The best way to deal with ABM is to vote for the party with a pro-growth, positive agenda. Voting for the people ABM targets won’t shut ABM up. It’ll just tell them that ABM is wrong for Minnesota.

If you want government of, by and for the special interests that raise your taxes and spend money foolishly, vote for ABM-approved candidates. If you prefer a prosperous Minnesota that works for families and the small businesses found on Main Street, then vote against ABM-approved candidates.

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