Archive for the ‘Michelle Fischbach’ Category

Collin Peterson just made it official. He’s running for re-election again, this time for a 15th term. This might be his stiffest test. As I wrote here, Peterson doesn’t represent the district anymore.

President Trump won MN-7 by 31 points. Despite that, Peterson voted against President Trump 85% of the time:

“Collin Peterson no longer represents Western Minnesota values,” added Fischbach. “One of his first votes this Congress was to ban the wall, and he votes against President Trump 85 percent of the time. Unlike Peterson, I will work with President Trump to secure our borders, build the wall, fight against the Democrats’ socialist agenda, and keep America great.”

It’ll be interesting to see how motivated Peterson will be. Staring him in the face is the possibility of working from the minority with Ilhan Omar and AOC. That can’t be an appealing thought for Peterson. Also, it’s apparent that his relationship with Pelosi has soured, too. The day after Peterson voted against Schiff’s articles of impeachment, Pelosi slighted Peterson:

The USMCA is a big deal with farmers. The wide-angle shot at the start of this video is revealing in who isn’t in the picture. Hint: Peterson isn’t there. To a calculating woman like Pelosi, that isn’t accidental. That’s meant to send a signal that Peterson’s in her doghouse.

Peterson won’t return to Nancy’s good graces anytime soon because Nancy’s a vengeful bitch. The voters in MN-7 need to come together on whichever candidate they pick. This isn’t an opportunity that happens every year.

Every other year, people question whether Collin Peterson will retire. It’s like a fifth season in Minnesota. The order goes spring, summer, fall, is Collin Peterson retiring, then winter. Last fall, Peterson announced that he’d announce whether he’d seek another term “in January or February.” February is half gone and we still haven’t heard anything from Peterson.

What we have heard is that, if he runs, Peterson has a primary challenger:

Thaddeus Laugisch, of Moorhead, on Thursday, Feb. 13, said he planned to challenge U.S. Rep. Collin Peterson for his 7th District seat. Laugisch is seeking the Democratic endorsement for the seat and said he could be a better advocate than Peterson, the nearly three-decade incumbent, for Minnesota’s workers.

“Families of western Minnesota are struggling while CEO profits are at all-time highs,” Laugisch said in a news release. “Minnesotans deserve a fresh perspective in Washington that fits their needs, instead of the needs of the wealthy.”

I’ve never heard of Mr. Laugisch. I’m not surprised by that because Collin Peterson is the DFL bench in CD-7.

Peterson has not yet announced whether he will seek another term and several GOP candidates have signed up to take on Peterson in the district that favored President Donald Trump over Hillary Clinton in 2016 by 30 percentage points. Peterson said last year that he expected to make an announcement about his plans in January or early February, but two weeks into February Peterson still hadn’t made public his plan.

It’s impossible to know what Peterson’s plans are at this point but nothing will surprise me. In one way, I think the retirement question is almost irrelevant. Peterson votes against President Trump 85% of the time in a district that Trump won by 31 points in 2016. That’s a strong structural disadvantage to start a campaign.

Peterson has won by smaller and smaller margins the past few cycles. In 2018, which was a strong DFL year, Peterson won by 4.26%. In 2016, Peterson won by 5.06%. In 2014, Peterson won by 8 points. In 2012, Peterson won by 20 points.

Republicans have several top-tier, well-financed, challengers running. In the interest of full disclosure, I contributed to Michelle Fischbach. That being said, I don’t have a vote in the matter. If he runs, the people might involuntarily retire him.

It seems like each week brings more bad news in Collin Peterson’s direction. Just minutes ago, I spotted this tweet:


There are endorsements and then there are endorsements. Michele Bachmann’s endorsement in a staunchly pro-life district like MN-7 is definitely a difference-maker. Here is Michele Bachmann’s endorsing statement:

Here’s what Willmar Radio announced:

Former Congresswoman Michele Bachmann, who has served as a member of President Trump’s evangelical advisory board in the past, says she is endorsing former Lt. Governor and State Senator Michelle Fischbach, who is running for Congress in western Minnesota’s 7th District. If she wins, Fischbach, of Paynesville, will become the second Republican woman from Minnesota elected to the US. House of Representatives; the first was Bachmann.

Thus far, Collin Peterson, the House Agriculture Chairman, has done nothing to get USMCA ratified in the House. Watch this pathetic string of excuses from the Democrats’ ‘leadership’ team:


Pelosi’s Do-Nothing Democrats are a failure. They’ve focused on impeachment while ignoring USMCA. The Democrats’ priorities aren’t America’s priorities. Democrats deserve to return to minority status in the U.S. House of Representatives. Removing Collin Peterson would be a fantastic start to accomplishing that goal.

At 4:00 pm this afternoon, I received an email from the Fischbach for Congress campaign committee. The email’s opening paragraph said “Michelle Fischbach, the former Lt. Governor of Minnesota and candidate for Minnesota’s 7th Congressional District, today reported raising an impressive $100,000 in her first quarterly filing with the Federal Election Commission.”

Then it continued, saying “Fischbach’s federal committee, Fischbach for Congress, will show receipts of over $100,000, with nearly $85,000 cash-on-hand for the filing period ending September 30, 2019. Making the numbers even more impressive is the fact that the committee wasn’t filed with the Federal Election Commission until September 3, 2019, which gave Fischbach only 27 days to fundraise before the quarterly reporting deadline. Minnesotans accounted for 95% of all donations, with almost half coming from residents of western Minnesota’s 7th District, including over 500 donors who gave $200 or less.”

That’s the definition of a strong fundraising first month. What’s most impressive to me is that 95% of her first month’s contributions came from Minnesotans. The next most impressive thing in this report is the amount of small donors. The reason why that’s important is because a high percentage of those contributions are likely voters.

What’s depressing, though not surprising, is the fact that Google is suppressing good news for Republicans. Here’s what I found in searching for articles on Lt. Gov. Fischbach’s fundraising report:

After reading this part of the Fischbach for Congress email, it has to be asked if Collin Peterson will run for re-election:

Fischbach’s strong first quarterly report demonstrates that her campaign is setting the foundation for a robust and aggressive operation and confirms the highly competitive nature of the 7th District race. In fact, immediately after she announced her campaign in September and pointing to her entrance into the race, Cook Political Report and Sabato’s Crystal Ball both moved Minnesota’s 7th District from Leans Democrat to Toss Up.

I can’t imagine Peterson likes the fact that AOC and Ilhan Omar have taken over his party. Still, it’s difficult picturing Peterson giving up without a fight. If he runs, which I think is likely, then I think it’s likely that he’ll lose.

These fundraising numbers, plus the shifting of the race from leans Democrat to straight toss-up, are indicators that this race has shifted. That shift didn’t favor Cranky Collin, either. Finally, the fact that the overwhelming majority of Fischbach’s support came from Minnesota can’t be read as anything except as a positive.

President Trump didn’t officially endorse Tim Pawlenty during his rally in Duluth this week but he helped Pawlenty’s campaign by mentioning his running mate in the opening minutes of the rally:

Trump said “I also want to thank Lt. Gov. Michelle Fischbach for being here. She has been so great. Got a big race coming along. She’s gonna do great. The Johnson campaign tried downplaying the mention:

Johnson campaign manager Justin Arnold dismissed the significance of Trump’s mention of Fischbach. “She’s the sitting Lt. Governor of Minnesota and was there in that capacity,” Arnold said in an email. “It’s not surprising at all that she would be mentioned.”

With all due respect, President Trump didn’t just mention Fischbach as the sitting lt. gov. of Minnesota. President Trump also mentioned that she’s “got a big race” and that “she’s gonna do great” in that upcoming race.

The bigger point is that Jeff Johnson travelled to Duluth in the hopes of getting Trump’s endorsement and came away without getting mentioned. That’s noteworthy considering the fact that he’s the Republicans’ endorsed candidate for governor.

I don’t dislike Jeff Johnson. I think he’s a good man who’s solid on policy. It’s that I like Tim Pawlenty more. Pawlenty has clearly had a better run of things in terms of fundraising than Johnson. President Trump’s mention of Lt. Gov. Fischbach won’t help Johnson’s fundraising.

On the DFL side, Erin-Squared will likely win the DFL Primary because Lori Swanson and Tim Walz will likely split the rural vote while E-Squared will feast on urban votes thanks to the DFL primary in the Fifth District. That primary will be way in the rear-view mirror by the time November rolls around.

While my constitutional position on Lt. Gov. Fischbach hasn’t changed, Don Davis’ article reminded me why I despise Sen. Bakk’s political tactics. It’s why Gov. Dayton didn’t trust Bakk. According to Davis’ article, Bakk said “he wants to time a lawsuit so the court can remove Fischbach as senator when Democrats can best elect a replacement for her in the central Minnesota district. If that happened, Democrats would take control. Fischbach said she is confident she can win her district again, if a court orders he removed from the Senate. But Bakk said Democrats have a candidate waiting who is ‘a good fit for the district.'”

That good fit must be Larry Hosch. He’s the only candidate who’d have a prayer in that district. If Hosch isn’t the candidate, then Sen. Bakk is just blowing smoke. The DFL’s bench in that district is virtually nonexistent. From what I’ve been told, Hosch’s wife is from Paynesville, which would be important to winning a special election.

That being said, Hosch announce his retirement from the House the minute that Rockville was added to his House district in 2012. Rockville consistently gives the GOP House candidate 80% of their votes. The minute the redistricting map was announced, Hosch essentially admitted that he’d get his butt kicked if he ran for re-election. What part of that sounds like Rep. Hosch is “a good fit for the district”? What part of this looks competitive?

FYI- HD-13A used to be Hosch’s district. He would’ve been lucky to lose by only 15 points if he’d chosen to run. Sen. Bakk can yap all he wants about good fits for the district but the numbers tell a different story. Whoever the DFL would run would get annihilated.

The point is that Sen. Bakk is either incredibly stupid or he’s playing a game. I don’t think he’s that stupid but I might be wrong.

Ramsey County Judge John Guthmann dismissed Destiny Dusosky’s lawsuit, saying that ‘the suit lacks ripeness,’ adding that her claim ‘is premature and based on speculation.'” Judge Guthmann then wrote that “Dusosky, a Sauk Rapids resident, ‘failed to demonstrate that she was injured in a way that is any different than all residents of Senate District 13.'”

Sen. Fischbach’s best argument might be that “past court cases say she can hold down both offices if the lieutenant governor job is ‘temporary.’ She said that since the job would end early next year, it must be considered temporary.” The counter-argument to that is that the job isn’t temporary in that it’s for the rest of the term.

The bad news for Sen. Fischbach is that “the judge dismissed the case in a way that a new one may be filed. His decision also may be appealed. The judge made it clear a new case could be accepted. ‘However, this is not the right case, the right plaintiff, the right time or the right legal context. …'”

In other words, a new lawsuit will be filed soon. Either that or this ruling will be appealed to the Minnesota Supreme Court, which Gov. Dayton packed with DFL activists. If I was a betting man, I’d bet that the Minnesota Supreme Court will rule against Sen. Fischbach. By that time, most of this session will have been wasted.

Sen. Fischbach could’ve avoided all this by simply resigning her Senate seat, taking the oath of office for Lt. Gov., then resigning the minute Gov. Dayton announced the date for the special election to fill the SD-13 seat. Had Sen. Fischbach done that right away, she’d be Senator-Elect Fischbach. That would let her vote for a weak DFL senator in a swing district to be the next Lt. Gov.

Republican friends in SD-54, today’s the day we can elect Denny McNamara. Today’s the day Republicans can solidify their Senate majority. In fact, a McNamara victory gives Republicans a chance to hand Gov. Dayton and the DFL a major defeat.

First, McNamara is excellent on environmental issues. He isn’t a squish on these issues. He’d bring lots of grit to those issues, which is a big deal considering how many jobs-related issues are tied by the DFL to the issue. In Minnesota, the biggest jobs fights are tied directly to the environment. Electing McNamara will give Republicans a better chance of winning those fights.

Next, Jason Lewis supports McNamara. Jason even campaigned with him:


Sen. Dan Hall wants Denny McNamara as a colleague:


Finally, a McNamara victory gives Republicans at least 34 senators regardless of the outcome of the Fischbach fiasco. Think about this possibility: The court rules that Sen. Fischbach can’t keep her Senate seat. Gov. Dayton sets the date for the Fischbach special election. Fischbach resigns as Lt. Gov. With McNamara in place, Republicans elect a DFL senator from a swing district, perhaps from David Hann’s or Dave Thompson’s former districts. That gives Republicans a great shot at recapturing another seat in the Senate. After Fischbach wins her special election, combined with a McNamara victory and another victory from Hann’s or Thompson’s district, Republicans would have a 36-31 majority instead of the 34-33 majority they had last year.

That’s a long way of saying it’s important (imperative?) to get out and vote for Denny McNamara today.

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It’s difficult to defend Michelle Fischbach’s decision to attempt to serve as both Gov. Dayton’s Lieutenant Governor and the state senator representing SD-13. How can a supposedly educated woman think that the DFL operatives on the Minnesota Supreme Court will side with her, not with the man who appointed them?

Republicans point to a Minnesota Supreme Court ruling from 1898. At that time, the lieutenant governor was elected apart from the governor. Further, why would anyone think that it’s possible to serve simultaneously in the Executive Branch and the Legislative Branch? In March, 2016, I wrote a post titled Is the IRRRB unconstitutional? In that post, I cited an audit report from Jim Nobles, who wrote that “State statutes on IRRRB’s governance structure are vulnerable to a constitutional challenge.”

That’s because the IRRRB’s board is composed of Iron Range legislators who have the authority to appropriate money to specific projects. The IRRRB also is an executive branch agency whose commissioner is appointed by the governor. Simply put, you can’t serve in 2 different branches of government.

Sen. Fischbach should know this. She’s fighting a fight she can’t win. Apparently, she hasn’t figured that out yet. Here’s what she said:

I was elected by the constituents of Senate District 13, and I have a commitment to represent them in the senate.

She ran for and got elected to be the Senate President. Anyone with a bit of understanding of Minnesota’s constitution knows that the Senate President is part of the line of succession to the governorship. If Sen. Fischbach wanted to guarantee that she represent the citizens of SD-13 for the full 4-year term, then she shouldn’t have run for Senate President.

If Lt. Gov. Fischbach cares about the Constitution, she should resign from the Senate this afternoon. The minute Gov. Dayton announces the date for the special election for filling her empty Senate seat in SD-13, she should then resign as Lt. Gov., then immediately start campaigning to regain her Senate seat.

By attempting to wear both hats, she’s causing a constitutional crisis that might hurt Republicans this session and that will cost taxpayers tons of money to pay for the lawsuit that she’ll lose. Apparently, Sen. Fischbach thinks that the Constitution doesn’t apply to her. She’s wrong. She should resign before she hurts her constituents.

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Thanks to a little research help from some loyal readers of LFR and thanks to some clever thinking of my own, I’ve figured out a way to turn the tables on Gov. Dayton and Sen. Bakk. First, Sen. Fischbach needs to get sworn in as lieutenant governor the minute Tina Smith is sworn in as Minnesota’s U.S. senator. Next, Fischbach needs to resign as lieutenant governor by the end of this week.

Thanks to some research from a loyal reader of LFR, I’m able to publish as fact that state statute 204D.19 subd. 2 says “The special election shall be held as soon as possible, consistent with the notice requirements of section 204D.22, subdivision 3(The county auditor of a county in which a special election is to be held shall direct the clerk of each municipality in which the election is to be held to post a notice of the special primary and special election at least seven days before the special primary and at least 14 days before the special election in the manner provided in sections 204B.33 and 204B.34.), but in no event more than 35 days after the issuance of the writ. A special election must not be held during the four days before or the four days after a holiday as defined in section 645.44, subdivision 5 (Washington’s and Lincoln’s Birthday(2/19/18), the third Monday in February).”

Notice that the statute says the special election shall be held as soon as possible. It doesn’t say that it should be held as soon as possible. The instant that Fischbach resigns as senator, Gov. Dayton is obligated to call a special election “as soon as possible.”

At that point, the Senate will have 33 Republicans and 32 Democrats. It will stay that way until the special election is held to replace Sen. Schoen in the Senate. If Karla Bigham wins, the Senate is tied with 33 Republicans and 33 Democrats. It’s worth noting that this is the best the DFL can hope for. Things would get much worse for the DFL if Denny McNamara wins. That would give Republicans a 34-32 majority. When the special election is held to replace Sen. Fischbach, Republicans will win that seat handily. At that point, Republicans would either have a 35-32 majority or a 34-33 majority.

Either way, Republicans would have a majority going into the start of the 2018 session. At that point, Republicans could elect any DFL senator to be the President of the Senate. Presumably, Republicans could elect the most vulnerable DFL senator as the President of the Senate. At that point, the DFL wouldn’t have a say in the matter. There’s nothing to prevent Republicans from naming someone like Matt Little to be the President of the Senate. That means Little would assume the responsibility of being Gov. Dayton’s lieutenant governor. Remember that this used to be Dave Thompson’s seat. I’d think that’d give Republicans a fantastic opportunity of flipping that seat.

The DFL is intent on flipping the Senate from a Republican majority to a DFL majority. They’ve made that perfectly clear. Why shouldn’t Republicans use this opportunity to their political advantage? That was the DFL’s intent. If Republicans beat the DFL at their own game, that’s the DFL’s fault.

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