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Whenever a DFL politician talks about major construction projects, whether it’s the Sandpiper Pipeline project or the PolyMet Mining project, they always say these 6 extra words:

“We need to do this right.”

This time, the politician was Al Franken and the project he was talking about was PolyMet. Unfortunately, Sen. Franken loves using the environmental activists’ code words. Here’s a perfect example:

The Minnesota Democratic senator, who is in a re-election contest with Republican challenger Mike McFadden, spoke about the copper/nickel/precious metals venture during an interview at the Mesabi Daily News Monday morning. The senator said he believes “a vast majority of Minnesotans want to see those (PolyMet) jobs … no question about that.”

Franken said he has regularly been in touch with PolyMet officials. And he has also heard from critics of the project. “One thing I’m very aware of is that we haven’t done this before here,” the senator said. “But boy, can I understand how people are frustrated” about the nine years of environmental review. “Believe me that’s not lost on me.”

Franken said he aligns himself with the Iron Range Legislative Delegation on the issue — “Get it done based on the science.”

“Get it done based on the science” is code for ‘let’s let the environmental activist organizations drag this out with lawsuits, PR stunts and propaganda wars’. DFL politicians are experts at that. DFL politicians like Sen. Franken and Rep. Nolan are professionals when it comes to looking like they’re doing something while dragging their feet.

That’s what they’ve both done since getting to DC. Nolan voted for HR 761, then promised environmental activists that he wouldn’t vote for it again if it came back for final passage:

Northern Minnesota is known for its great fishing, so perhaps it’s fitting that tracking 8th District Congressman Rick Nolan’s position on a bill that deregulates the mining industry and fast tracks the permitting process for PolyMet is a bit like watching a fish flopping around on a dock: first he’s against it, then he’s for it and now he once again opposes it, this time promising to vote against the legislation if it “comes anywhere near close to becoming law.”

This weekend, Nolan told Tom Hauser that he voted to streamline the permitting process. Sen. Franken couldn’t say that because he hasn’t lifted a finger to make PolyMet a reality. Nor has he done anything to streamline the permitting process in the future.

Instead, Dayton, Franken and Nolan have worked hard to walk a perilous tightrope. Dayton, Franken and Nolan have to appear to be friends of the miners without overstepping the environmental activists’ boundaries.

The PolyMet supplemental draft environmental impact statement is currently in the comment review phase, which Department of Natural Resources Commissioner Tom Landwehr said earlier this month should be completed in early-2015.

If the project receives a certificate of adequacy from the SDEIS, permits can follow, with construction beginning. The venture is projected to create 360 permanent jobs, hundreds more spin-off positions and more than 2 million hours of construction.

“We’ve got an incredible deposit of minerals,” Franken said. “But if this had been done too soon and it was tainted and the watershed contaminated, it would be mitigated for decades or centuries. And what would that have meant for the second or third project?”

Throughout this process, environmentalists have portrayed mining companies as deadbeats that destroy the environment, then skip the country while taxpayers foot the cleanup bill. They’ve also portrayed mining companies as thugs who love destroying the environment in their lust for big profits. This is dishonest.

That isn’t what happens. These companies have a history of following the rules. They have a history of doing things right.

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I’ll risk saying this but the professional political punditry needs to get start seeing things through a policy impact perspective, not through a ‘will it play politically’ perspective. During this morning’s gubernatorial debate, Gov. Dayton said that he’s long advocated for a single-payer health care system.

What was the collective reaction from the professional political punditry? Crickets. No big deal. Keep moving.

The government, whether we’re talking about the Obama administration or the Dayton administration, is incapable of handling anything that complex. In too many instances, it’s incapable of handling fundamental responsibilities.

That professional political pundits think it isn’t a big deal to advocate for a system that’s never worked anywhere because that’s been his standard answer is shameful. Style points seem to matter more than character, policy impacts and what’s best for Minnesota.

It’s time to tune out the professional political pundits because they’re too interested in election outcomes. Unfortunately, they aren’t interested enough in policy outcomes. Jeff Johnson’s policies will make life better in Minnesota. Unlike Gov. Dayton, Jeff Johnson will fight to build the Sandpiper Pipeline because that’ll free up railcar space so farmers can get their crops to market. That makes life better for hard-working Minnesota farmers. Unlike Gov. Dayton, Jeff Johnson will fight to open PolyMet because that’ll create hundreds of good-paying jobs. That’d make life significantly better for miners and mining communities.

Apparently, these things don’t matter to the professional political punditry from both sides of the aisle. Their tweets didn’t speak to what’s best for Minnesota. They just spoke to who won or lost based on game-changing moments and style points. That isn’t responsible journalism. That’s the type of partisanship that’s rotted our institutions and corrupted the political process.

If Republicans retake the House of Representatives and Gov. Dayton gets re-elected, Republicans will have a mandate because they spoke about issues. Gov. Dayton will have retained his title but he won’t have a mandate because he hasn’t spoken about what he’d do in his second term.

The DFL isn’t the party of no. They’re the party that won’t say no to their special interests that are driving Minnesota’s economy into the ground. Ask an Iron Ranger if they’re better off now than when Gov. Dayton took office. If they’re honest, they’ll say they aren’t. Their median household income has increased marginally. The percentage of people living below the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) grew by roughly 50%.

Health insurance premiums have skyrocketed. It’s virtually impossible to get changes made to policies to include or drop people from coverage. Still, Gov. Dayton insists that “it isn’t perfect” but that it’s getting better. Once a month, if not more often, we hear of another MNsure-related disaster.

Meanwhile, the professional political punditry insist that Gov. Dayton is winning because Jeff Johnson didn’t have that big game-changing moment. With all due respect, these political junkies are missing the point. Jeff Johnson has been solid. He’s provided sensible solutions to Minnesota’s biggest problems. Gov. Dayton has been dismissive, arrogant and utterly incompetent. He’s Minnesota’s version of Jimmy Carter.

It’s time to ignore the political junkies because they’re worried more about gamesmanship than doing what’s right for Minnesota. While we’re at it, it’d be great to get rid of the incompetent in the Governor’s Mansion, too.

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This article is rather enlightening:

“I learned some important lessons from him. First of all, the importance of a job to someone who doesn’t have one. My job as governor is to do everything I can to provide jobs for the people of Minnesota, those who are unemployed, those who are underemployed, to those who want better opportunities for those young people from Bemidji High School who were here and are going onto college and need a better job environment when they graduate.”

Dayton says, “Whatever I can do to make a difference and to be proactive” will frame his administration.

“It’s easy to say no to this and no to that and no to everything, but Perpich said, ‘What can I do?’ to try to make a difference. I hope I can follow in those footsteps. I won’t be building chopsticks factories or visiting castles in Switzerland. Rudy had, as the French said about [de Gaulle], the faults of his virtues and the virtues of his faults. We all have our faults, and we hope for a lot more virtues than faults.

First, let’s highlight the fact that Gov. Dayton isn’t being proactive in providing “jobs for the people of Minnesota, those who are unemployed” and “those who are underemployed.” In February, 2011, Gov. Dayton thought underemployment was a problem along with unemployment. Gov. Dayton in 2014 gets testy when Commissioner Johnson talks about Minnesotans who are underemployed.

When did Gov. Dayton determine that underemployment wasn’t a priority?

Next and most importantly, why isn’t Gov. Dayton interested in being proactive about mining jobs? He hasn’t lifted a finger to make PolyMet a reality. Don’t unemployed miners deserve a proactive governor who’s doing everything possible to create great paying jobs? Is Gov. Dayton only interested in being proactive when his environmental activist allies give him permission?

Finally, it’s interesting hearing Gov. Dayton talk about “hucksters who promise chopsticks factories” as though they were Republicans in 2014 while admitting that Gov. Perpich brought the chopsticks factory to Hibbing in a 2011 interview.

Comparing Perpich’s chopsticks factory with PolyMet is intellectual absurdity. The chopsticks factory went bankrupt in less than 3 years. PolyMet would create 360 mining jobs that would be there for a generation.

Clearly, Gov. Dayton hasn’t thought this stuff through. Clearly, Gov. Dayton hasn’t figured it out that his silence is giving dishonest environmental activists implicit permission to protest PolyMet, which they’re doing.

Will voters let Gov. Dayton off the hook for being a proactive jobs governor for the Twin Cities but an inactive jobs governor for the rest of Minnesota? It’s important to find out the answer to that question because that’s who he’s been.

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After last night’s bombshell polling data from Minnesota’s Eighth District, the next questions are quite logical. First, when will the DCCC and Nancy Pelosi’s PAC pull their money from the Mills-Nolan race? Second, when that money is pulled, where will it be spent?

The conventional wisdom is that the money pulled from Nolan’s race would be spent on Collin Peterson’s race. I don’t think that’s what they’ll decide. They’ve already pumped millions of dollars into the Westrom-Peterson race. It hasn’t hurt Westrom a bit. Next, they’ve thrown everything at Torrey, including the proverbial kitchen sink. Torrey Westrom keeps gaining. In fact, Torrey will campaign tomorrow with Mike McFadden:

McFadden knows that his message sells in the Seventh. He’s campaigned with Torrey before, too. It’s obvious that they feed off each other and complement each other nicely. Why would Pelosi’s superPAC or the DCCC shift money into that situation?

Finally and most importantly, a little money pays for tons of ads in the 7th. How much more money does Collin Peterson need to win that race? People know Peterson because he’s finishing his twelfth term. If the first and second ad buys didn’t put Peterson over the top, why would the DCCC think that the third and fourth ad buys will? Known commodities are known commodities. If they don’t sell right away, they won’t jump off the shelf later.

Pelosi’s superPAC and the DCCC have other seats that need propping up. Nolan’s seat is history. He’s an ancient candidate whose policies are from the 1970s. There’s nothing that indicates he’ll catch fire in the last 2 weeks.

Peterson has a better shot at winning but that’s because he’s frequently won with over 60% of the vote. He’s either popular and heading for victory or people have tired of him and he’s heading for defeat. There isn’t a middle ground with him.

Ken Martin, the DFL, Steve Simon, Gov. Dayton and Sen. Franken are watching these races. That’s because they know their races are based, at least partially, on doing well in these districts. If Nolan and Peterson lose, Gov. Dayton’s, Sen. Franken’s and the DFL’s path to victory gets complicated fast.

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I predicted that Gov. Dayton would attempt to deflect criticism from the bogus health insurance premium rate increase report. I was right:

Republican Jeff Johnson seized Thursday on new insurance data to accuse Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton of lying about how much health premiums will increase for coverage next year.

Johnson said the Dayton administration is lowballing the medical premium estimates for political advantage. Dayton shot back that Johnson is ignoring that people are free to shop around for the best deal and said his charge demonstrates a rival who “gets more desperate by the day.”

Gov. Dayton’s response was predictable. In fact, I predicted it. Gov. Dayton’s dismissive attitude won’t sit well with Alycia Reidl. Here’s what she told the MNsure Board of Directors:

“You’ve got to remember, the majority of consumers who have individual health insurance policies did not buy them through MNsure,” says Alycia Reidl of the Minnesota Association of Health Underwriters. “Most of them are outside of MNsure at this point, and they haven’t received their renewals yet. As they start to receive them, they’re going to understand they have significant increases facing them.”

Reidl made that point to the MNsure Board at their first meeting since the new MNsure rates were announced. She told them many Minnesotans now have the mistaken notion their rates will go up only 4.5 percent. Instead, Reidl says they’re likely to get “sticker shock” when they see their increases. “The increases that are happening are putting our clients in a really difficult situation which is putting us in a difficult situation as the bearer of that news,” Reidl told the MNsure Board.

Gov. Dayton’s dismissiveness is only exceeded by his dishonesty. The Minnesota Association of Health Underwriters are experts on the size of rate increases because they’re working with it every day. By contrast, Gov. Dayton has shown that he doesn’t know what’s in the bills he’s signed. If I’m forced to choose between Alycia Reidl or Gov. Dayton on the issue of trust, that’s an easy decision. Hint: I wouldn’t trust the sitting governor of Minnesota as much as I’d trust Ms. Reidl.

The administration’s 4.5 percent average leaves out PreferredOne, a dominant player in MNsure last year that isn’t selling policies through the exchange this year. Details that surfaced Wednesday show its customers could see up to 60-percent premium increases if they want to keep their policies and buy them away from the exchange for 2015.

Gov. Dayton is fond of saying that PreferredOne “‘misjudged the market'” last year by offering lower costs than bigger competitors in an attempt to gain market share.” Whether that’s true or not, the reality is that PreferredOne’s rates are going up in a big way. Minnesotans will experience sticker shock when they get their renewal notices.

Commissioner Johnson should be asking Minnesotans who’ve seen their new rates for 2015 if they’re feeling the Dayton-DFL middle class squeeze. I’d remind people that Republicans didn’t vote for MNsure, which means the double-digit increases they’re seeing are Gov. Dayton’s and the DFL’s fault. They passed it. They own this disaster.

Gov. Dayton can make petulant child-like comments insinuating that Jeff Johnson isn’t being honest. What Gov. Dayton can’t do is hide from MAHU’s well-documented numbers. Those numbers show how expensive health insurance is through MNsure. Gov. Dayton’s hissy fits won’t change those facts because facts are stubborn things.

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When Gov. Dayton’s Department of Commerce announced MNsure’s rate increases, skeptical statements poured in. State Senate Republicans put together this interactive map to spread the truth that Gov. Dayton’s Department of Commerce wouldn’t. KSTP’s Tom Hauser says people are justified in worried about big health insurance premium spikes:

With great fanfare earlier this month, Minnesota Department of Commerce officials announced Minnesota would continue to have among the “lowest health insurance rates in the country.” They were referring to health insurance sold through MNsure, which they said would only increase an “average of 4.5 percent.”

That modest increase was immediately met with skepticism by Republican opponents of Gov. Mark Dayton’s administration. However, the health insurance industry is also throwing cold water on the notion that Minnesotans will see rates go up just 4.5 percent. Whether buying insurance in the MNsure system or through the private market, for most Minnesotans reality will not match the rosy 4.5 percent “average increase.”

“You’ve got to remember, the majority of consumers who have individual health insurance policies did not buy them through MNsure,” says Alycia Reidl of the Minnesota Association of Health Underwriters. “Most of them are outside of MNsure at this point, and they haven’t received their renewals yet. As they start to receive them, they’re going to understand they have significant increases facing them.”

Reidl made that point to the MNsure Board at their first meeting since the new MNsure rates were announced. She told them many Minnesotans now have the mistaken notion their rates will go up only 4.5 percent. Instead, Reidl says they’re likely to get “sticker shock” when they see their increases. “The increases that are happening are putting our clients in a really difficult situation which is putting us in a difficult situation as the bearer of that news,” Reidl told the MNsure Board.

That’s just the tip of the iceberg. Here’s another part of that iceberg:

When Gov. Dayton says that Minnesota’s health insurance rates are the cheapest in the nation, it’s important to highlight the fact that, though that’s true, it’s after three-fourths of the people received rate increases while transitioning from the policies they liked to Obamacare-approved policies. The next logical question would be about how big those premium increases were. You ask. I’ll deliver:

According to that graphic, 28.3% of people surveyed got rate increases of 11-20%. Another 30% of the people got rate increase ranging between 21%-30%. Another 15% of people got rate increases of 31%-40%. Those statistic don’t fit with the bill’s title of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

I’ve said it before and I’ll repeat it here. When the ACA kicked in, most everyone’s premiums spiked. That means that Minnesota’s premiums are the least terrible premiums in the nation. They’re a better grade of terrible.

Jeff Johnson is calling on Gov. Dayton to apologize for lying to Minnesota about the rate increases:

“A few weeks ago, Mark Dayton stood before the press and flat-out lied to Minnesotans. Dayton’s claim that MNsure rates are going up an average of just 4.5% next year is completely bogus, and he knows it. I call on Governor Dayton to come clean and apologize to Minnesotans for lying to us. Enough is enough.”

I’m predicting that Gov. Dayton, or one of his paid shills, will release a statement saying that Commissioner Johnson’s accusations are the actions of a desperate candidate who’ll say anything in his attempt to win an election. Commissioner Johnson, I’d have a statement prepared to respond to Gov. Dayton’s unresponsive response. Here’s what I’d put in that statement:

Gov. Dayton, why are you accusing “Alycia Reidl of the Minnesota Association of Health Underwriters” of lying? In the days ahead, our campaign will be releasing stories from families throughout Minnesota who will verify MAHU’s report.

Minnesota doesn’t need a governor who won’t admit that MNsure, Obamacare in Minnesota, is an unmitigated disaster. Minnesota needs a governor with integrity and fresh ideas that will take Minnesota in the right direction.

I’m being charitable by saying Gov. Dayton’s Commerce Department used slippery math in the MNsure rate increase report. Gov. Dayton’s actions inform us that he isn’t a man of integrity. He’s a man just hoping to get past November 4th.

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This editorial, from the Mesabi Daily News Editorial Board, insists on getting the Sandpiper Pipeline project built:

Symbolic meetings by elected officials being held on the rail delays that are severely affecting transportation of products and goods to market, including iron ore pellet deliveries from the Range to the Duluth-Superior Port, are feel-good nice and make for good photo opportunities.

Yes, it’s good to push for improvement of the U.S. rail system, even though the politicians are coming late to the issue, not dealing with it until it has reached a crisis level.

But what is really needed is a bipartisan meeting of all Minnesota office-holders along with business and labor leaders to endorse more urgency in getting oil pipelines up and running. Pipelines are the proven safest and most expedient way to get the liquid gold of our domestic self-sufficiency boom from the oil fields to refineries. And, pipelines also mean jobs.

Yet, it’s delay and delay and delay and a lot of political posturing when it comes to allowing and constructing pipelines. Meanwhile, some politicians put out news release after news release on the all sides of the issue, except, of course, advocating for getting pipelines built and operational.

Whether it’s the XL Keystone pipeline that would go from Canada’s western slope to Gulf states or the $2.6 billion Sandpiper pipeline through northern Minnesota to carry North Dakota oil to a terminal in Superior, Wis., that feeds refineries across the Midwest, both are hung up in unnecessary regulatory delay.

Enough of the political rhetoric. Let’s get at the core of the issue.

Enough’s enough is right. Environmental activists are doing everything to prevent the Sandpiper Pipeline and the Keystone XL Pipeline projects from getting built. It’s time they grew up. It’s time for DFL politicians in Minnesota and Democrats nationwide to reject the consequences of these extremists’ policies.

Their goal isn’t to put in place technologies that make fossil fuels safe. These environmental activists want to eliminate the use of fossil fuels:

Sierra Club Programs
Priority Campaigns

Beyond Coal
Beyond Oil
Beyond Natural Gas
Our Wild America

The DFL agrees with the Sierra Club the vast majority of the time. Gov. Dayton’s appointees to the Public Utilities Commission, aka the PUC, apparently agree with the Sierra Club. They took the unprecedented step of proposing a different route for the Sandpiper Pipeline. That step means a delay of years, not months.

That’s time farmers and miners don’t have. Farmers already have difficulty getting their crops to market. Miner have difficulty getting iron ore pellets shipped to the ports of Duluth-Superior.

Here’s how serious the Sierra Club is about ending mining, fracking and drilling:

It’s time for Minnesotans to reject the environmental extremists’ agenda. Their agenda is about stopping the fracking revolution that’s lowering gas prices and increasing the supply of natural gas, which lowers Minnesotans’ heating bills.

If the DFL wants to stand with the Sierra Club, let them explain to Minnesotans why it’s better to pay high prices to heat their homes while not creating good paying jobs on the Iron Range.

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The least competent DFL governor of my lifetime criticized the most successful DFL governor of my lifetime during Tuesday’s debate in Duluth. Here’s what Gov. Dayton, the least competent DFL governor of my lifetime said:

“I’ve seen the hucksters go up there and promise chopstick factories.”

There’s only one person that fits Gov. Dayton’s description:

Jul. 19, 1989 11:06 AM ET
HIBBING, MINN. HIBBING, Minn. (AP) _ Lakewood Industries, a Hibbing chopsticks factory that Gov. Rudy Perpich had called a major step in efforts to revitalize northern Minnesota’s Iron Range, has closed.

Lakewood Forest Products, the plant’s parent firm in Canada, said Tuesday that it closed the factory because of a financial restructuring. The company said in a press release that it had been talking with a potential overseas investor, but that discussions broke off Tuesday.

Discussions with other potential investors are continuing, but management “has determined that in light of the company’s working capital position it is necessary to close the plant until adequate financing sources have been identified and a financial restructuring plan implemented,” the release said.

In case that date doesn’t remind you of something, this paragraph will:

On its first anniversary, the Hibbing plant was criticized by Independent-Republican leaders as a government-backed boondoggle conceived for Perpich’s hometown. Perpich was unavailable for comment on the closing.

Here’s Gov. Dayton’s full criticism of Gov. Perpich:

“Irresponsible…you’re just doing it for political advantage,” he said. “I’ve been working on behalf of northeastern Minnesota for 37 years and I’ve seen the hucksters go up there and promise chopstick factories…and all those other things because they are dangling out the prospects of jobs. Well we’re going to do this one responsibly.”

I’d love hearing Gov. Dayton explain how preventing PolyMet from being built is irresponsible but funding DFL GOTV call centers is responsible:

EVELETH, Minn.— Iron Range Resources and Rehabilitation Board (IRRRB) Commissioner Tony Sertich today announced that New Partners Consultants, Inc. will operate a call center for its customers at Progress Park in Eveleth. The company is finalizing plans to lease the space that formerly housed Meyer Associates, Inc. New Partners will utilize some equipment from the Meyer operation, which is currently under IRRRB’s ownership. Staffing will begin as soon as all agreements are in place, possibly as early as next week.

“We are pleased to have played a role in facilitating the reopening of the center,” said Sertich. “This project will result in new job opportunities, particularly for those displaced by the Meyer closing.”

The man running the IRRRB is Tony Sertich, who was appointed by Gov. Dayton. If anything fits the definition of hucksterism, that fits. By the way, here’s the definition of huckster:

someone who sells or advertises something in an aggressive, dishonest, or annoying way

It’s disgusting that Gov. Dayton accused Commissioner Johnson of hucksterism while Gov. Dayton is engaging in hucksterism. Commissioner Johnson is simply fighting for PolyMet and for the streamlining of a process that’s corrupted by rich special interests. By comparison, Gov. Dayton is fine with maintaining the corrupt status quo.

Why shouldn’t Gov. Dayton? The activists corrupting the environmental review are Gov. Dayton’s and the DFL’s biggest supporters. Putting the puzzle together, it’s obvious that Gov. Dayton and the DFL don’t want a straightforward, streamlined review process. If it was streamlined, the environmental activists wouldn’t have the multiple opportunities to kill important projects that they hate. Right now, PolyMet and Sandpiper top their list of projects to kill.

Gov. Dayton and the DFL don’t share Minnesota’s priorities. They’ve proven that by calling people names without explaining why they’re fighting for the corrupt status quo. Yesterday, Gov. Dayton got out of control, criticizing his first boss for being a huckster. I’m not even sure he realizes what he did.

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One of this morning’s dramatic moments during a feisty debate between Jeff Johnson and Gov. Dayton came when Gov. Dayton accused Commissioner Johnson of pandering by saying he supported PolyMet:

In the first one-on-one debate of the campaign, Dayton labeled Johnson a “huckster” for promising mining permits on the Iron Range before environmental studies have been completed as a way to endear himself to a Democratic voting stronghold in northeastern Minnesota.

During this morning’s gubernatorial debate in Duluth, Commissioner Johnson exposed Gov. Dayton’s PolyMet doublespeak. Commissioner Johnson said his support for PolyMet was built on PolyMet being important for creating jobs on the Iron Range. Responding to Commissioner Johnson, Gov. Dayton said that it was irresponsible to hijack the environmental review.

That gave Commissioner Johnson he’d been waiting for. First, he cited the 9-year process as being too long and too expensive. Then he said that he didn’t want environmental activists “from the Twin Cities” killing the project.

Gov. Dayton’s response was classic DFL doublespeak. Gov. Dayton agreed that 9 years was too long for the review process. Then he said it would be wrong to hijack the process when the review was in its final stages. What’s stunning is that Gov. Dayton didn’t notice that he didn’t complain that the process took too much time while he was governor.

The reason why it’s noteworthy is because Gov. Dayton is only ‘getting religion’ now that he’s up for re-election.

Commissioner Johnson repeatedly attacked Gov. Dayton as being beholden to the DFL’s special interests. He specifically said that environmental activists “from the Twin Cities” were preventing Gov. Dayton from advocating for the PolyMet mining project because “they don’t want mining.”

Later, Commissioner Johnson accused Gov. Dayton’s appointees to the Public Utilities Commission of killing the Sandpiper Pipeline project. When Dayton said that he didn’t interfere with the Commission’s business, Commissioner Johnson replied, saying that he presumed that the commissioners he appointed shared Gov. Dayton’s views on the environment.

Then Commissioner Johnson accused Gov. Dayton of “hiding behind the process” instead of being a leader. After Commissioner Johnson accused Gov. Dayton of hiding behind the process, Gov. Dayton defended letting the process play out. Let’s remember that Gov. Dayton said that the process had taken too long and that he didn’t speak out about the process within his administration.

There’s something else that hasn’t gotten enough scrutiny. That’s the fact that Gov. Dayton hasn’t talked about whether the review process gives environmental activist organizations too much of an opportunity to drag the process out unnecessarily. The truth is that the process is intentionally convoluted to create the delays we’ve seen with PolyMet and Sandpiper.

This isn’t a fair process. It’s weighted to favor environmental activists’ wishes. The process isn’t streamlined so environmental issues are addressed and investors’ issues are addressed. If the DFL won’t untip the scales, then it’s fair to highlight the fact that the DFL is a subsidiary of the environmental activist left.

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Watching all the ads being run by Nancy Pelosi’s PAC, the Franken campaign, the Nolan campaign and all the anti-business rhetoric coming from the Dayton campaign, DFL chairman Ken Martin and other anti-business parasites, there’s only one conclusion you can draw. The DFL and its candidates hate employers. Joe Soucheray’s column highlights the DFL’s silliness perfectly:

It’s to the point of comedy that the national Democratic Party has raced to Minnesota to help Nolan out with television ads that feature yachts and private airplanes and white sand beaches. I guess the voter is supposed to believe that Mills sits around all day and has grapes fed to him as he pages through the Neiman Marcus Christmas catalog pining for a new Maserati Ghibli S Q4.

Whether it’s Nancy Pelosi’s superPAC or Rick Nolan’s campaign, the hard left’s disdain for companies is unmistakable. It’s in each of their ads against Stewart Mills. What’s most appalling is that the DFL’s agenda doesn’t have a thing in it that says they’re pro-capitalism. In fact, when the DFL held their state convention, Iron Range Democrats wanted the state party to ad a simple sentence to their party’s platform. That simple sentence was to say that the DFL supports mining.

After hours of negotiations, aka Metrocrats intimidating the Iron Range delegation, that simple sentence was dropped because Alida Messinger declared that statement was too controversial. Nolan isn’t the only 1970s reject that thinks companies are evil:

The Franken camp says that as an investment banker, McFadden has brokered the sales of companies that have resulted in the loss of jobs. Well, that can be true in some cases. In other cases, there will be a gain of jobs. Besides, once a company is bought or sold, what does McFadden have to do with it? The Franken camp also insists that McFadden has been involved with companies that have committed the mortal sin of tax inversion by moving their headquarters overseas. No. McFadden’s company represented a foreign company being bought, not the U.S. company moving abroad. That’s business, however unfamiliar Franken might be to business.

In Franken’s thinking, the problem isn’t that the tax code is filled with special favors. It’s that small businesses, aka the rich, aren’t paying a high enough tax rate. The thing is that Franken and Nolan haven’t started a business that requires sound judgment. That’s why they don’t know that many of these small businesses owners work 60-75 hours/week to build a business, paying their employees first, then paying their bills before they can start funding their retirement and their kids’ college education.

After sweating through tough times before getting to the point of profitability, then idiots like Dayton, Franken and Nolan accuse them of being greedy and of “not paying their fair share.”

The truth is that Stewart Mills and Mike McFadden have done more to improve middle class families’ lives in 5 years than Dayton, Franken and Nolan have done in a lifetime. Long-winded politicians haven’t paid for their employees’ health insurance or contributed to their employees’ retirement accounts or paid them a good wage that put a roof over their employees’ families’ heads. Stewart Mills and Mike McFadden have.

When Dayton, Franken and Nolan do that for a generation, then I’ll listen, not a minute before.

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