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Catherine Richert’s article suggests a significant anti-DCCC backlash forming against Rick Nolan:

In the end, life-long Democrat Andy Larson’s decision to vote for Republican Stewart Mills over DFL incumbent Rick Nolan came down to the ads he’s seeing every day on television. “I’m very disappointed in my fellow party members in the types of advertisements just attacking Mr. Mills for his wealth,” Larson said. “It’s completely unwarranted. It’s really turned me off.”

Larson isn’t the only Democrat disgusted with the DCCC’s ads:

Paul Lemenager, a video producer in Duluth, feels the same way about the ads, which are coming from outside groups, not Nolan’s campaign. But he also says Mills’ business experience is attractive.

“The fact that his family owns a business and understands what it takes to develop a business and jobs and to put a business into the black,” Lemenager said. “Nolan has taken on the tone of a career politician. We have so much of that in Washington. We really need someone who understands what it takes to pull out of the slump economically.”

The Obama economy is the weakest economic recovery since the end of World War II. President Obama’s policies have contributed directly to this current stagnation. There isn’t a dime’s worth of difference between President Obama’s economic plan and Rick Nolan’s voting record. Whatever President Obama wants, Rick Nolan votes for.

The thing that hasn’t gotten talked about, though, is that Stewart Mills isn’t a trust fund baby who’s never worked a day in his life. That’s just the propaganda that the DCCC and Nancy Pelosi’s superPAC have spread since the start of the campaign. Unlike our governor, Stewart Mills has had professional, private sector responsibilities for which he’s been rewarded financially. He’s made things work. He’s grown the Mills Fleet Farm chain. Lots of people are employed through that retail chain.

If it isn’t Stewart’s way to talk about his successes, then I’ll tout them. Stewart Mills is obviously doing things right. Mills Fleet Farm is growing, partially because they self-insure their employees. That means they don’t have to deal with the ACA’s regulations and taxes. Their stores are growing more profitable because they’re the ultimate blue collar retail chain. People in the Eighth District like the Mills chain because it’s got the types of things people use frequently.

It’s hard to characterize Stewart Mills as an out-of-touch rich kid when the retail chain he runs specializes in selling things that middle class families want.

Frankly, I’ve thought that the DCCC’s ads and the ads from Pelosi’s superPAC were way over the top. They aren’t substantive ads, which is what many voters are looking for. These voters aren’t looking for the Democrats’ negativity. They’re looking for solutions and common sense.

If voters elect Stewart Mills, that’s exactly what they’ll get. That’s why the DCCC’s ads are backfiring.

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After last night’s bombshell polling data from Minnesota’s Eighth District, the next questions are quite logical. First, when will the DCCC and Nancy Pelosi’s PAC pull their money from the Mills-Nolan race? Second, when that money is pulled, where will it be spent?

The conventional wisdom is that the money pulled from Nolan’s race would be spent on Collin Peterson’s race. I don’t think that’s what they’ll decide. They’ve already pumped millions of dollars into the Westrom-Peterson race. It hasn’t hurt Westrom a bit. Next, they’ve thrown everything at Torrey, including the proverbial kitchen sink. Torrey Westrom keeps gaining. In fact, Torrey will campaign tomorrow with Mike McFadden:

McFadden knows that his message sells in the Seventh. He’s campaigned with Torrey before, too. It’s obvious that they feed off each other and complement each other nicely. Why would Pelosi’s superPAC or the DCCC shift money into that situation?

Finally and most importantly, a little money pays for tons of ads in the 7th. How much more money does Collin Peterson need to win that race? People know Peterson because he’s finishing his twelfth term. If the first and second ad buys didn’t put Peterson over the top, why would the DCCC think that the third and fourth ad buys will? Known commodities are known commodities. If they don’t sell right away, they won’t jump off the shelf later.

Pelosi’s superPAC and the DCCC have other seats that need propping up. Nolan’s seat is history. He’s an ancient candidate whose policies are from the 1970s. There’s nothing that indicates he’ll catch fire in the last 2 weeks.

Peterson has a better shot at winning but that’s because he’s frequently won with over 60% of the vote. He’s either popular and heading for victory or people have tired of him and he’s heading for defeat. There isn’t a middle ground with him.

Ken Martin, the DFL, Steve Simon, Gov. Dayton and Sen. Franken are watching these races. That’s because they know their races are based, at least partially, on doing well in these districts. If Nolan and Peterson lose, Gov. Dayton’s, Sen. Franken’s and the DFL’s path to victory gets complicated fast.

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The Tarrance Group’s latest polling on the Westrom-Peterson race isn’t good news for Collin Peterson:

The Tarrance Group is pleased to present the following findings from our recently completed telephone survey of N=300 registered “likely” voters in Minnesota’s Seventh Congressional District. The Tarrance Group was commissioned by the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) to conduct a telephone survey in this district. A random sample of this type is likely to yield a margin of error of +5.8% in 95 out of 100 cases. Responses to the survey were gathered October 12-14, 2014.

Torrey Westrom has pulled ahead in the race for the congressional seat long held by DFL incumbent Collin Peterson. Westrom has made steady improvement throughout the campaign and now eclipses the incumbent. Turnout modeling puts the race at 48% Westrom and 46% Peterson, with only 6% undecided. Those undecided voters do not seem likely to break toward an incumbent they know so well.

With a margin of error of 5.8% and with the race being this close, this race is anything but settled. Also, it’s always wise to question private partisan polls. Still, this can’t give the Peterson campaign comfort.

It’s noteworthy that the KSTP-SurveyUSA poll showed Peterson leading 50%-41%, with a distinct oversampling of Democrats:

Sen. Westrom has fought a great campaign. He’s raised the money to be competitive. He’s travelled the district to increase his name recognition. He’s enunciated a message that’s resonating with voters. In short, he’s given Peterson a legitimate reason to worry.

It isn’t accidental that the DCCC has spent a few fists full of money on advertising. That advertising has mostly focused on criticizing Sen. Westrom for his alleged role in the Dayton government shutdown. Prior to this partisan private polling, this already figured to be Peterson’s toughest re-election fight yet.

That fight just gained in intensity. The thing is that the DCCC has already thrown the kitchen sink at Torrey. They don’t have many bullets left in the clip.

Entering this summer, conventional wisdom was that Stewart Mills had a better shot at defeating Rick Nolan than Torrey Westrom had of defeating Collin Peterson. That’s mostly due to the fact that Rick Nolan wasn’t the top-tier candidate that Peterson was. Apparently, Peterson isn’t as popular in the district as his recent election numbers indicated.

Going into this summer, I thought Republicans would win either defeat Peterson or Nolan. I didn’t think they’d defeat both of them. I still have trouble believing that they’ll accomplish that feat but it’s definitely a better possibility today than a month ago.

If Republicans flip both seats, it’ll be bad night for the DFL and for Nancy Pelosi.

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Stewart Mills nailed it in this article about the impact outside money has on races:

Every day of his 8th Congressional District campaign, he said, he hears evidence of a backlash of reaction from viewers to independent expenditure messages made by outsiders. “They know nothing about this district and they certainly know nothing about me,” Mills said earlier this month at the Crow Wing County Republican Victory Office in Baxter.

The DCCC’s ads sound like Nancy Pelosi’s superPAC ads, which sound almost identical to the ads Rick Nolan is running.

Just off the top of my head, I’ll come pretty close to the script. “Stewart Mills inherited his money. He opposed middle class tax cuts so that wealthy billionaires and multinational corporations could keep their tax breaks.” If that sounds familiar, it’s because it’s only slightly different than the cookie cutter ad the DCCC is running against Torrey Westrom. The only difference between the two ads is that the DCCC’s ad against Torrey Westrom accuses Westrom of essentially masterminding the state government shutdown in 2011 while the DCCC’s ad against Stewart Mills is that he’s a rich and out of touch and that he that wants to go to Washington to protect his rich friends’ tax breaks.

He said his own message of a consumer based health insurance solution and a reining in of regulatory overreach is resonating with Republicans and independents alike. “I endeavor to run a very issues focused campaign,” Mills said. “Our message agrees with them.”

Despite the Democrats’ claim that people like the ACA, Mills is using the Affordable Care Act effectively to his advantage. Running against the EPA is another winner in the Eighth, too. Miners know that the federal government, especially the EPA and the US Forest Service, are preventing PolyMet from getting built. That’s a hot button issue if ever I heard of one for the Eighth District.

He wants a health care insurance solution that’s comprehensive. He said he favors the aspect of the Affordable Care Act in which people can’t be rejected for insurance because of pre-existing conditions. He rejects his opponent’s call for a single payer health care system.

“Consumerism works,” Mills said. “Socialism doesn’t.”

Because Mills has run Mills Fleet Farm’s health insurance program, he’s got instant credibility on the issue. Nolan didn’t try challenging him on health care during last week’s debate because he knows Mills is loaded with ammunition to blister Nolan on Nolan’s health care policies.

If the DCCC and Pelosi’s superPAC continue with the ads they’re currently running, there will be an anti-Nolan backlash. That wouldn’t be pretty for Nolan.

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I just published this post to highlight the DCCC’s campaign ad smearing Stewart Mills. Here’s the centerpiece of the DCCC’s smear campaign against Mills:

“Stewart Mills III caught a big inheritance and a job at the family business that pay half-a-million year. But in Congress, Mills will leave you on the hook for higher taxes because Mills opposed tax cuts for the middle class – even as he wants to give another huge tax break to millionaires like himself.”

Next, let’s compare that DCCC lie against Stewart Mills with the lie the DCCC is telling about Torrey Westrom:

“Westrom led the charge to shutdown Minnesota’s government. Why? Because he wouldn’t let go of tax breaks for millionaires.

Here’s Poligraph’s verdict against the DCCC’s lie against Torrey Westrom:

The 2011 government shutdown happened because Gov. Mark Dayton and the Republican controlled Legislature could not agree on a budget to close the state’s $5 billion deficit. Dayton wanted to raise taxes on Minnesota’s top earners (which he did in the last legislative session), but Republicans objected.

That’s true but incomplete. Poligraph’s verdict left out the fact that Republicans were prepared to pass a lights-on bill that would’ve avoided a shutdown while Republicans negotiated a budget solution with Gov. Dayton. Poligraph’s verdict also left out the fact that the budget Gov. Dayton signed after the longest shutdown in state history was the budget he could’ve signed at the end of the regular legislative session.

Further, the budget that the GOP legislature passed never, at any point, included tax cuts for any income group. PERIOD.

The DCCC’s ad is a lie. They’ve done the research on the 2011 budget that Gov. Dayton signed. Their researchers kept track of the bills and amendments that Republicans offered. I triple-dog dare the DCCC to cite the HF/SF number or the amendment offered by Torrey Westrom or anyone in the House or Senate that would’ve cut millionaire’s taxes.

They won’t accept that offer because they know a ‘millionaire’s tax cut’ bill doesn’t exist, especially in Minnesota.

Whether it’s the DCCC, ABM or another of the DFL ‘alphabets’, the script remains the same. The script isn’t the script if it doesn’t lie in accusing Republicans of wanting to cut millionaires’ taxes. I can’t say that that accusation is fictional because the definition of fiction is “something feigned, invented, or imagined; a made-up story.” The DCCC doesn’t engage in fiction. It just lies through its teeth. Here’s the definition of lies:

a false statement made with deliberate intent to deceive; an intentional untruth; a falsehood.

That’s what the DCCC and ABM do with frightening regularity.

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According to MPR’s article, the DCCC’s latest ad attacking Stewart Mills doesn’t get much right:

The closest the DCCC ad comes to correct is in its claims about Mills personal wealth.

After that, the DCCC gets its facts wrong. Mills said he opposed the Cash for Clunkers program, but that has nothing to do with opposing middle class tax cuts. And while Mills has talked around the issue of tax reform, giving few details on what he would do, the DCCC makes some assumptions about how Mills would vote on tax cuts for the wealthy if he were elected to Congress.

For leaving out critical details, this ad is misleading at best.

That’s MPR’s verdict. Here’s their unabridged version:

In the DCCC’s latest ad, a Mills stand-in hops on his yacht, and motors off into the sunset:

“Stewart Mills III caught a big inheritance and a job at the family business that pay half-a-million year. But in Congress, Mills will leave you on the hook for higher taxes because Mills opposed tax cuts for the middle class – even as he wants to give another huge tax break to millionaires like himself.”
This ad enters rough waters.

The Evidence

Mills is the Vice President of Mills Fleet Farm, his family’s business where Mills has spent his career. According to financial disclosure documents, Mills was paid more than $500,000 to do that job in 2013, and has company assets into the tens-of-millions.

To back up its claim that Mills opposes tax cuts for the middle class, the DCCC points to a January 2014 Start Tribune profile of the 8th district race. Mills told the Star Tribune that the Cash for Clunkers program, which paid people to turn in their old gas guzzlers, was “another failed example of Washington, D.C., trying to legislate the free market.”

What does Cash for Clunkers have to do with middle class tax cuts? Nothing.

Whether it’s the DCCC, the Alliance for a Better Minnesota or Nancy Pelosi’s House Majority PAC, the script doesn’t change. Candidate fill-in-the-blank wants to give millionaires tax breaks while voting against tax cuts for the middle class. The other thing that doesn’t change is whether it’s a lie. Poligraph is right. The DCCC ad gets it right that Stewart Mills has personal wealth. After that, they’re pretty much lying through their teeth. So is Rick Nolan, who lifted a big part of the DCCC’s script and put it into his ad attacking Stewart Mills.

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Despite Poligraph’s opinion about a recent DCCC attack against Stewart Mills, the DCCC’s attack is mostly BS. Here’s what the DCCC press release said:

“Millionaire Stewart Mills III has taken thousands of dollars in campaign contributions from the health insurance industry, and now he wants to put the insurance companies back in charge to deny care to people with-pre-existing conditions and kick kids off their parents’ plans,” a DCCC press release states.

PoliGraph admitted that the DCCC’s first claim is BS:

According to Mills’ campaign finance records, he’s gotten $1,000 from the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association PAC, and that’s it.

Apparently, the DCCC needs to return to grade school English. Apparently, they didn’t learn that thousands is plural for 1,000. Apparently, the DCCC didn’t learn that 1,000 is singular for thousands. Either that or they’re just lying through their teeth, which is a distinct possibility.

Here’s the part where PoliGraph is wrong:

The DCCC also claims that Mills wants to scrap popular parts of the Affordable Care Act, including a provision that prevents insurance companies from rejecting patients with pre-existing conditions and another provision that allows children to stay on their parents’ plans until they turn 26.

Here, the DCCC is on stronger footing.

First, saying that the DCCC “is on stronger footing” isn’t saying much considering the fact that they were totally wrong about the DCCC’s first statement. Further, the DCCC’s claim is false. Here’s why:

Campaign spokeswoman Chloe Rockow says Mills isn’t opposed to making sure young adults and those with pre-existing conditions have access to health insurance; he just thinks there are better ways of doing it.

For instance, Mills wants to strengthen privacy rules for people with pre-existing conditions and to reinstate the Minnesota Comprehensive Health Association, which is a special health insurance program for people with pre-existing conditions who can’t get insurance elsewhere.

In other words, Stewart Mills wants people with pre-existing conditions to get insurance. He just prefers a different method of getting people with PECs that coverage.

The DCCC said that Mills wants “to deny care to people with-pre-existing conditions.” That’s verifiably false. Period.

The title to PoliGraph’s article is “DCCC Mills claim half wrong, half right”. The article’s accurate title should be “DCCC Mills claim almost entirely wrong.” Mills didn’t take thousands of dollars from health insurance companies and he doesn’t want to deny health insurance to people with pre-existing conditions.

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TakeAction Minnesota’s latest press release instructs the press to investigate Stanley Hubbard:

Statewide people’s organization TakeAction Minnesota, which has offices in Duluth and Grand Rapids, issued the following statement regarding a political TV ad running in the 8th Congressional District which was pulled off the air by Hubbard Broadcasting last week in a flurry of controversy:

“The real story isn’t about Stewart Mills or Rick Nolan. The real story is about corporate conservatives limiting political dialogue and eroding free speech. It’s about a billionaire, Stanley Hubbard, protecting certain candidates who protect wealth at the expense of working people. It’s about corporate conservatives and media conglomerates owned and run by billionaires like Stanley Hubbard and the Koch Brothers protecting candidates for their own economic gain. How concentrated wealth increasingly controls public discourse at the expense of people. You can swap in any corporate conservative candidate you want for Stewart Mills.

“There are several important questions voters and the media should be asking. Why did the ad run in the first place? When and why was it decided that it must be pulled down? Did someone from the Mills campaign see it was running and call in a favor from Hubbard? Did Stanley Hubbard himself see the ad and decide it was damaging to Mills? Did someone from Hubbard’s friends connected to the Koch Brothers decide it needed the ax?

It’s understatement to say that the ad they’re talking about didn’t enhance public dialogue. It’s defamatory and dishonest. Saying that it’s highly edited and spliced is understatement. These 128 words that Stewart Mills said:

What happened in the last round of elections, where you had folks saying that ‘the wealthy, the wealthy are not paying their fair share, that there’s all these loopholes and they don’t pay any taxes and we have to make them pay more. Well, you know what? I’m gonna speak for myself and then I’m going to allude to a few others here. We’ve paid for all of our taxes. We reinvest the money we make into our business.

How come we are not generating the jobs in Northeastern Minnesota that we otherwise would? Well I can tell you why. Because the overwhelming group of people that run businesses, that have the ability to employ people are taxed at that personal rate. They are the villains, they’re the bad guys. They’re the ones that quote are not paying their fair share. They’re the ones quote that ‘the 2%, the 1%, whatever percent you want.

To be singled out as a deadbeat is personally offensive.

turned into this 26-word sentence he didn’t say:

…folks saying that ‘the wealthy, the wealthy are not paying their fair share…the 2%, the 1%, whatever percent you want…is personally offensive.

Next, let’s answer some of TakeAction Minnesota’s questions, starting with this one:

Why did the ad run in the first place?

To smear Stewart Mills. It isn’t a coincidence that this smear campaign started after the DCCC put Nolan on their version of endangered incumbents list and after the Cook Report changed their rating of the race from Leans Democratic to toss-up.

Rick Nolan is a deeply flawed candidate running a terrible, 1-issue race. It isn’t a coincidence that Nolan’s campaign is focusing on Mills “representing the 1-percent.”

Q2: When and why was it decided that it must be pulled down?

After attorneys from the Mills campaign a) notified KSTP and WDIO of the defamatory nature of the ad and b) reminded them that the TV stations weren’t protected from running the ad:

The false ad bankrolled by AFSCME/House Majority PAC against Stewart Mills does not constitute a “candidate use.” Under Columbia Broadcasting Sys., Inc. v. Democratic Nat’l Comm., 412 U.S. 94 (1973), and Nat’l Conservative Political Action Comm., 89 FCC 2d 626 (1982), your station is not obligated to air any advertisements from third parties, such as the AFSMCE/House Majority PAC, as third parties have no guaranteed right of access to air their advertisements on your station. Thus, broadcasting stations are not protected from legal liability for airing a false and misleading advertisement sponsored by the AFSCME/House Majority PAC. Moreover, broadcast licensees have a legal responsibility to review and to eliminate any false, misleading, or deceptive materials contained in advertising.

KSTP and WDIO pulled the ad when they saw that the ad was defamatory and they weren’t protected from having a lawsuit filed against them.

Q3: Did someone from the Mills campaign see it was running and call in a favor from Hubbard?

This is pure speculation intended to take the spotlight off the fact that Rick Nolan didn’t support mining jobs on the Range until the political pressure forced him into supporting creating mining jobs.

It isn’t a DFL conspiracy theory without throwing in this boogeyman:

Did someone from Hubbard’s friends connected to the Koch Brothers decide it needed the ax?

The paranoid rantings and the conspiracy theory just wouldn’t be complete without a reference to the Koch Brothers.

Now it’s time to ask TakeAction Minnesota this straightforward question: How can an organization that’s a major part of the DFL’s messaging and GOTV machine benefit from our nation’s tax laws? After all, TakeAction Minnesota’s facebook page states pretty clearly that they’re a nonprofit. Their member organizations page is filled with DFL front organizations. Their every action is, by Al Franken’s definition, political.

Simply put, TakeAction Minnesota’s public call for an investigation into Stanley Hubbard and the Koch Brothers is both a farce and a gimmick. This DFL front group’s questions are illegitimate because TakeAction Minnesota knows that the Pelosi ad was pulled because it was defamatory.

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This Strib article certainly can’t help Rick Nolan:

Republicans on Friday slammed Democratic Rep. Rick Nolan for planning a fundraiser with Peter Yarrow, the singer from the 1960s band Peter, Paul and Mary, who admitted in 1970 to having improper relations with a 14-year-old girl.

Rep. Nolan must be totally stupid for planning a fundraiser with this pervert. “Having improper relations with a 14-year-old” is timid language. Mr. Yarrow should still be in prison for statutory rape.

What’s interesting is that Nolan’s campaign didn’t respond to the Strib reporter:

Nolan’s spokeswoman deferred comments to the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.

“This is a desperate attempt from Stewart Mills to distract from the fact that he is personally offended when millionaires like himself are asked to pay their fair share,” said Brandon Lorenz, in an emailed statement.

If Rep. Nolan and the DCCC thinks that playing the class warfare card will deflect attention away from Peter Yarrow’s stench, they’re fools. If anyone’s desperate, it’s Nolan’s campaign and the DCCC.

Stewart Mills just was endorsed this weekend. According to people attending Saturday’s convention, Mills gave a great speech. Most importantly, these activists reported, the party’s support for Stewart Mills is enthusiastic. They think they’ve found a great candidate who’s got a fantastic message and who’s got a great fundraising machine.

Something else that’s interesting is what the Strib’s article didn’t include. Here’s part of Yarrow’s Wikipedia file:

In 1970, Yarrow was convicted of, and served three months in prison for, taking “improper liberties” with a 14-year-old girl who went with her 17-year-old sister to Yarrow’s hotel room seeking an autograph.

Why didn’t the Strib include this in their article? Saying that Yarrow admitted that he’d had “improper relations” with a 14-year-old isn’t the same as saying the pervert was convicted of a crime that included a prison sentence.

I’d be suprised if Nolan doesn’t disinvite Yarrow from the fundraiser. If he doesn’t, his political opponents will have a field day with him.
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Rep. Steve Israel’s op-ed is long on whining. The message that comes through clearly is that he doesn’t like it that Republicans put together a strategy for highlighting the ACA’s multitude of shortcomings:

New Yorkers have two ways of looking at a problem. You can ask, “What went wrong, and who do we blame?” or you can roll up your sleeves and ask, “What went wrong, and how do we fix it?”

If anyone in America had any question about which question congressional Republicans would ask, we now have an answer: House Republicans engineered a 17-page playbook detailing how to sabotage and repeal the Affordable Care Act so they can score political points. In this lengthy manual, however, Republicans didn’t offer a single idea for solutions, for helping constituents enroll in health care or understand their benefits. Rather, the entire handbook is a tactical guide to tearing down the law.

I’m impressed with the GOP’s playbook. What’s clear is that they’re effectively attacking the Democrats and the Affordable Care Act with statistics, personal anecdotes and op-eds.

Additionally, this isn’t a policy document on how to fix the Affordable Care Act’s multitude of shortcomings. It’s a playbook for attacking the Democrats while they’re especially vulnerable.

No DCCC op-ed is complete without a healthy dose of Democratic demagoguery. This blast of BS satisfies that ‘requirement':

Republicans have no playbook to create jobs, they have no playbook to build infrastructure, they have no playbook to pass immigration reform, they have no playbook to pass a budget and they have no playbook to propose a better health care system.

Their only playbook is to take us back to a system that didn’t work, that led hardworking people into bankruptcy and gave insurance companies unchecked power to deny care and drop coverage. Democrats, on the other hand, are going to relentlessly remind Americans that one party is willing to fix the Affordable Care Act and that one party, the Republican Party, wants to repeal the law and put insurance companies back in charge.

To quote a friend of mine, those paragraphs are more full of BS than a Christmas goose. The DCCC, like President Obama and the DNC, can’t talk without piling on the BS. That’s why people don’t trust President Obama anymore. He’s repeatedly lied to the American people about keeping their plan if they liked it. Now that he’s been caught lying, President Obama’s apologists have started rationalizing those promises away, saying that you can’t reform the health care system without significant changes.

That’s indisputably true but that isn’t the point. What’s equally true is that the ACA couldn’t have passed had President Obama told the American people that they could keep their plan if they liked it and if his HHS secretary approved of people’s plans.

Next, the GOP plan for creating jobs is equal parts repealing the ACA, expanding oil, coal and natural gas exploration and cutting EPA regulations that are killing industries.

Third, there’s one party, the Democratic Party, that’s trying its best to paint the Affordable Care Act as fixable, which it isn’t, while the other party, the GOP, predicted about the cancellation notices, the crashed website, the rising premium prices. Democrats call that being mean-spirited. Truth-seeking people call that getting it right.

If Democrats don’t want to get tagged over the Affordable Care Act every few minutes, they should worry first about doing right by the American people, not about how news affects them politically. No op-ed would be complete without them lying. Here’s Israel’s lie-infested trash:

Because when Americans see Republicans in Congress sharing an anecdote or holding a hearing, they can know it is designed to do one thing: Take the country back to the dark days when our health care system didn’t work.

The “dark days when our health care system didn’t work” is now. It isn’t that the system worked perfectly before the Democrats shoved the ACA down Americans’ throats. It’s that that system worked significantly better than it’s working under the Affordable Care Act. Republicans have offered their own plans, which Democrats have refused to consider. It isn’t Republicans’ fault that Democrats, starting with Harry Reid and President Obama, are the obstructionists in DC.

Rep. Israel’s statements are misleading, incomplete or verifiably false. In other words, they’re what’s expected from Democratic leadership.

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