Categories

Archive for the ‘Activism’ Category

Few apolitical people know that the Democratic Party has put in place a system that chills political involvement and that buys elections. I have proof that both statements are true. Starting with buying elections, this story proves that the DFL broke Minnesota’s campaign lawss and bought 11 Senate seats:

The Republican Party of Minnesota began filing complaints in October 2012, charging that DFL campaign materials were wrongfully listed as independent expenditures, but the materials were not because the candidates were actively engaged in photo shoots in producing the print ads, thereby breaching the legal wall between candidates and independent expenditures.

For those that want to argue that this is just Republican sour grapes, I’d ask them to explain this:

The Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board Tuesday, Dec. 17, fined the Minnesota DFL Senate Caucus $100,000 for wrongfully working with 13 of its candidates in the 2012 election.

The $100,000 civil penalty is among the biggest in state history.

These sitting senators should be kicked out of the Senate for their actions. Further, they should be fined for their actions, as should the DFL Senate Caucus for their actions. Finally, there should be a special election to replace Democrats that broke the law.

If it’s a financial hardship for these Democrats, good. I’m not interested in making their lives comfortable. I’m interested in making examples of them. They’ve lost the right to be called public servants. They’ve earned the right to be called lawbreakers. These Democrats have earned the right to be considered unethical politicians.

While buying elections is a serious thing, it’s trivial compared with the political witch hunt that’s happening in Wisconsin:

MADISON, Wis. – Conservative targets of a Democrat-launched John Doe investigation have described the secret probe as a witch hunt.

That might not be a big enough descriptor, based on records released Friday by a federal appeals court as part of a massive document dump.

Attorneys for conservative activist Eric O’Keefe and the Wisconsin Club for Growth point to subpoenas requested by John Doe prosecutors that sought records from “at least eight phone companies” believed to serve the targets of the investigation. O’Keefe and the club have filed a civil rights lawsuit against John Doe prosecutors, alleging they violated conservatives’ First Amendment rights.

While there’s no doubt Democrats will deny a connection between the IRS-TEA Party scandal and this witch hunt, they’re too similar in intent to ignore. Here’s what John Chisholm, the Milwaukee County prosecutor leading this witch hunt, obtained through his pre-dawn paramilitary raids:

Court documents show the extraordinary breadth of the prosecutors’ subpoena requests.

They sought phone records for a year-and-a-half period, “which happened to be the most contentious period in political politics,” the conservatives note. They note that prosecutors did not pursue the same tactics with left-leaning organizations that pumped tens of millions of dollars into Wisconsin’s recall elections, in what certainly appeared to be a well-coordinated effort.

Among other documents, prosecutors sought “all call detail records including incoming and outgoing calls,” “billing name and information,” “subscriber name and information including any application for service,” according to the conservatives’ court filing.

In other words, these Democrat prosecutors wanted to intimidate people they didn’t agree with. They used tactics third world dictators use to intimidate the citizenry:

Chisholm, a Democrat, launched the dragnet two years ago, and, according to court documents, with the help of the state Government Accountability Board, the probe was expanded to five counties. The John Doe proceeding compelled scores of witnesses to testify, and a gag order compelled them to keep their mouths shut or face jail time. Sources have described predawn “paramilitary-style” raids in which their posessions were rifled through and seized by law enforcement officers.

This isn’t just a fishing expedition. It’s a message from Democrats to Republicans that they’ll use their offices to intimidate their political enemies. It’s a message from Democrats that they’re weaponizing government agencies.

This isn’t just happening in Wisconsin. It’s happened in Texas, too, where a Democrat with a penchant for getting highly intoxicated abused her office to indict Gov. Rick Perry for doing what other governors have done since the founding of their respective states. She indicted him because he vetoed a bill cutting off funding for her office.

It isn’t coincidence that Scott Walker and Rick Perry are considered potential presidential candidates. In fact, I’d argue that Chisholm launched his fishing expedition into Gov. Walker to defeat him so he can’t run for president.

Check back later today for Part II of this series.

Technorati: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

It’s amazing that Charlie Weaver has any Republican friends left. I wouldn’t show my face for a month if I’d said this BS about the Dayton/DFL economy:

“The economy is pretty strong,” said Charlie Weaver, a veteran of state Republican politics and executive director of the Minnesota Business Partnership, which represents the state’s largest corporations. “We have a low unemployment rate — one of the lowest in the country,” he said.

A former top aide under Gov. Tim Pawlenty, Weaver predicted that Republican candidates, particularly Dayton’s challenger, will be forced to find other issues as contrasts with Democrats.

Far too often, this is what happens when a Republican gives up his principles to become a lobbyist. What happened here is Charlie Weaver, lobbyist, said something Charlie Weaver, conservative, wouldn’t get caught dead saying.

Weaver’s statement is a combination of fiction and professional self-preservation. It’s impossible for an honest person to look at the July jobs report and conclude the economy is strong. July’s jobs report just confirmed the fact that Minnesota’s economy sucks:

Minnesota lost 4,200 jobs in July, disappointing news in a year so far of tepid job growth for the state. The unemployment rate remained at 4.5 percent, according to figures released Thursday by the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development. The U.S. unemployment rate in July was 6.2 percent.

June’s job gains were also revised downward by 3,600, driving home the point that over the first seven months of the year Minnesota’s job market has been stuck in neutral. After adding 41,900 positions from August to December 2013, the state has added only 2,900 jobs since January. Some 133,000 Minnesotans are officially unemployed, and thousands more are working part-time jobs when they would rather work full time.

Isn’t Mr. Weaver troubled by the fact that one-third of the jobs created in the past year are government jobs? If he isn’t, why isn’t he? Certainly, Mr. Weaver is smart enough to know that government confiscates people’s money. Certainly, he knows that government doesn’t create wealth.

Over the last 6 months, revenues have fallen significantly short of projections. In July, it fell short of projections by 6.6%. This constitutes a trend. That isn’t a one-time blip.

What’s particularly disgusting is that Charlie Weaver is hurting Jeff Johnson’s campaign whenever he lies about the strength of the Dayton/DFL economy. Months of terrible jobs reports, combined with revenues consistently falling short of projections, aren’t the statistics that you get from a booming economy. Yes, 2,900 jobs created in 7 months is pathetic. By comparison, St. Cloud created 2,894 jobs in 12 months.

Over the past 12 months, 68,344 jobs were created in Minnesota. A total of 46,339 jobs were created in Minneapolis-St. Paul, followed by St. Cloud with 2,894, Mankato with 1,236, Duluth-Superior with 1,145 jobs followed by Rochester with 1,054 jobs. That’s a total of 52,668 jobs created in those cities.

Noticeably missing from the list are Moorhead, Brainerd, Monticello, Hutchinson, Willmar and any Iron Range cities. Mr. Weaver, isn’t it important to creat jobs in those cities, too? Apparently, Gov. Dayton doesn’t think so. Apparently, Gov. Dayton and Mr. Weaver think it isn’t important to create jobs in northern Minnesota cities not named Duluth.

I’m pretty certain that people in Forest Lake, Grand Rapids, Alexandria, Pierz and Little Falls think it’s important to create jobs in their towns. I’m pretty certain that they’d love seeing new businesses starting up in their cities.

Here’s the dirty little secret Charlie Weaver doesn’t want anyone to know. He isn’t looking out for Main Street Minnesota. He’s looking out for big corporations. This isn’t a criticism of big corporations. I appreciate any company that employs lots of people. It’s merely highlighting the fact that big corporations have the resources to comply with Gov. Dayton’s and the DFL’s regulations and tax code.

Small businesses, the kind found throughout the 6th, 7th and 8th districts, find it difficult to create wealth and expand their companies. If you only care about the Twin Cities, which Mr. Weaver apparently does, then Minnesota’s economy might look ok.

If you care about statewide prosperity, though, which Jeff Johnson does, then Minnesota’s economy isn’t doing well.

If Mr. Weaver wants to peddle Gov. Dayton’s BS that Minnesota’s economy is “pretty strong”, then he’d better expect me to highlight the truth about Minnesota’s job creation statistics. He’d better be prepared to be called out for his BS.

Technorati: , , , , , , , , , , ,

This morning’s @Issue was offensive to informed voters. It started with Tom Hauser sleepily repeating the discredited DFL talking point that jobs are “coming back.” It continued when Sarah Janacek called ABM’s ads against Jeff Johnson “outside money.” Retread political hack Don Betzold kept the misinformation going by saying that “it’s too early to tell” what insurance rates will be.

Let’s start with Hauser repeating the DFL line about jobs. It’s BS. They aren’t coming back. That’s just the DFL lying through its teeth. This year, the Dayton/DFL economy has created 2,900 jobs in 7 months. The Dayton/DFL economy lost 4,200 jobs in July. The revenue projection for July was off by 6.6%, coming in $69,000,000 short of MMB’s projection.

That isn’t proof of a Minnesota economic recovery. It isn’t proof that the Dayton/DFL policies are taking us in the right direction. It’s proof that they’re failing, especially when you consider the fact that one-third of the jobs created in the last 12 months were government jobs.

It’s sad to see Sarah Janacek make foolish statements like calling ABM “outside money.” She knows better than that. She knows that ABM is funded by Alida Messinger, the public employee unions and community organizing organizations with deep ties to the DFL.

In short, ABM is the DFL’s messaging unit. Pretending that they’re an arms-length distant organization just isn’t being honest with people. Further, Ms. Janacek shouldn’t be that gentle with ABM. They’re a disgusting organization that specializes in smear campaigns. ABM is devoid of virtue and honesty. They should be treated like the parasitic political hatchet organization that they are.

Let me repeat this message to timid GOP pundits like Ms. Janacek: ABM should be exposed and ridiculed for being dishonest and untrustworthy. Tip-toeing around ABM’s disgusting tactics gives them a legitimacy they didn’t earn.

Finally, Don Betzold should’ve been criticized for saying that he didn’t know what insurance premiums would be. If he actually doesn’t know, then he should be put out to pasture. If he knows, he should be exposed as a political hack repeating the DFL’s talking points.

Honesty matters in messaging and reporting. That’s why Tom Hauser and Sarah Janacek should be criticized for their timid, misinformed statemenets.

The lone bright spot was Brian McClung. Brian was well-informed and confident in his presentation of important information.

The AFL-CIO of Minnesota should simply change its name. They aren’t a union representing “working families.” Based on their announcement, they’re just another DFL front group. Look at their endorsement list:

Governor & Lieutenant Governor
Governor Mark Dayton & Tina Smith (DFL)

United States Senate
Senator Al Franken (DFL)

Secretary of State
Steve Simon (DFL)

United States House of Representatives
District 1 – Congressman Tim Walz (DFL)
District 2 – Mike Obermueller (DFL)
District 3 – Sharon Sund (DFL)
District 4 – Congresswoman Betty McCollum (DFL)
District 5 – Congressman Keith Ellison (DFL)
District 6 – Joe Perske (DFL)
District 7 – Congressman Colin Peterson (DFL)
District 8 – Congressman Rick Nolan (DFL)

Minnesota House of Representatives
1A Bruce Patterson (DFL); 1B Eric Bergeson (DFL);
2A Rep. Roger Erickson (DFL); 2B David Sobieski (DFL);
3A Rep. David Dill (DFL);3B Rep. Mary Murphy (DFL)
4A Rep. Ben Lien (DFL);
5A Rep. John Persell (DFL),5B Rep. Tom Anzelc (DFL)
6A Rep. Carly Melin (DFL); 6B Rep. Jason Metsa (DFL)
7A Jennifer Schultz (DFL); 7B Rep. Erik Simonson (DFL)
8A Jim Miltich (DFL); 8B Jay Sieling (DFL)
9A Dan Bye (DFL); 9B Al Doty (DFL)
10A Rep. John Ward (DFL); 10B Rep. Joe Radinovich (DFL)
11A Rep. Mike Sundin (DFL)
12B Gordon Wagner (DFL)
13A Emily Jensen (DFL)
14A Dan Wolgamott (DFL); 14B Rep. Zach Dorholt (DFL)
15A Dale James Rittenour Jr. (DFL); 15B Brian Johnson (DFL)
16A Laurie Driessen (DFL); 16B James Kanne (DFL)
17A Rep. Andrew Falk (DFL); 17B Rep. Mary Sawatzky (DFL)
19B Jack Considine (DFL)
20B Rep. David Bly (DFL)
21A Lynn Schoen (DFL); 21B Mark Schneider (DFL)
22A Diana Slyter (DFL); 22B Cheryl Avenel-Navara (DFL)
23A Pat Bacon (DFL)
24A Beverly Cashman (DFL); 24B Rep. Patti Fritz (DFL)
27B Rep. Jeanne Poppe (DFL)
31B J. D. Holmquist (DFL)
32A Paul Gammel (DFL); 32B Laurie Warner (DFL)
33A Todd Mikkelson (DFL)
34B David Hoden (DFL)
35A Peter Perovich (DFL)
36A Jefferson Fietek (DFL)
37B Susan Witt (DFL)
38A Pat Davern (DFL); 38B Greg Pariseau (DFL)
39A Tim Stender (DFL); 39B Tom DeGree (DFL)
40A Rep. Mike Nelson (DFL); 40B Rep. Debra Hilstrom (DFL)
41A Rep. Connie Bernardy (DFL); 41B Rep. Carolyn Laine (DFL)
42A Rep. Barb Yarusso (DFL); 42B Rep. Jason Isaacson (DFL)
43A Rep. Peter Fischer (DFL); 43B Rep. Leon Lillie (DFL)
44A Audrey Britton (DFL)
45A Rep. Lyndon Carlson (DFL); 45B Rep. Mike Freiberg (DFL)
46B Cheryl Youakim (DFL)
47A Matt Gieseke (DFL)
48A Rep. Yvonne Selcer (DFL); 48B Joan Howe-Pullis (DFL)
49A Rep. Ron Erhardt (DFL); 49B Rep. Paul Rosenthal (DFL)
50A Rep. Linda Slocum (DFL); 50B Rep. Ann Lenczewski (DFL)
51A Rep. Sandra Masin (DFL); 51B Rep. Laurie Halverson (DFL)
52A Rep. Rick Hansen (DFL); 52B Rep. Joe Atkins (DFL)
53A Rep. JoAnn Ward (DFL); 53B Kay Hendrikson (DFL)
54A Rep. Dan Schoen (DFL); 54B Don Slaten (DFL)
55A Jay Whiting (DFL)
56B Rep. Will Morgan (DFL)
57B Denise Packard (DFL)
58A Amy Willingham (DFL); 58B Marla Vagts (DFL)
59A Rep. Joe Mullery (DFL); 59B Rep. Ray Dehn (DFL)
60A Rep. Diane Loefffler (DFL); 60B Rep. Phyllis Kahn (DFL)
61A Rep. Frank Hornstein (DFL); 61B Rep. Paul Thissen (DFL)
62A Rep. Karen Clark (DFL); 62B Rep. Susan Allen (DFL)
63A Rep. Jim Davnie (DFL)
64A Rep. Erin Murphy (DFL); 64B Dave Pinto (DFL)
65A Rep. Rena Moran (DFL); 65B Rep. Carlos Mariani (DFL)
66A Rep. Alice Hausman (DFL); 66B Rep. John Lesch (DFL)
67A Rep. Tim Mahoney (DFL); 67B Rep. Sheldon Johnson (DFL)

I wouldn’t have been shocked if 90% of the politicians that the AFL-CIO endorsed were Democrats. It’s stunning, though, to see that every candidate that they endorsed is a Democrat. Shar Knutson’s statement is utter fantasy:

“The 2013 and 2014 legislative sessions were some of the most productive sessions for working people in a generation.” said Minnesota AFL-CIO President Shar Knutson. “Their focus on middle class values like investing in education and job creation is working as Minnesota’s economy continues to strengthen.”

This legislature didn’t “invest in education.” They spent money on Education, which is the teacher’s union. There’s a big difference between the two things.

In fact, lower income families in the inner city are running from schools where these ‘investments’ were supposedly made. Further, the DFL legislature tried imposing a total moratorium on frack-sand mining, which would create hundreds of middle class jobs.

The AFL-CIO should stop pretending that it isn’t a DFL front organization. They should change their name to the DFL-CIO.

Technorati: , , , , ,

Bill Hanna’s article highlights what’s wrong with today’s DFL:

Gov. Mark Dayton says a far-reaching Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Superior National Forest regarding potential copper/nickel/precious metals ventures is totally unnecessary. So, too, do Minnesota U.S. Sens. Al Franken and Amy Klobuchar and 8th District U.S. Rep. Rick Nolan.

It would be a waste of time and money and energy, say those Democratic office holders, because it would duplicate what is already being done as far as environmental review for both the PolyMet and Twin Metals projects. And Congressman Nolan goes further to say the issue was already settled with the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Act in 1978 that allowed mining in the Superior National Forest.

But it’s not that clear, according to a U.S. Forest Service official. There is not even a timeline set up to decide whether the USFS will drop the PEIS request by environmentalists or move ahead with it. In a telephone interview with the Mesabi Daily News on Thursday, USFS Public Affairs Officer Kris Reichenbach in Duluth said there “is no immediate reason to push this” one way or another.

“This is not something to rush into. We are still evaluating our options. We are not at a point of making a decision. I am not aware of a timeline,” Reichenbach said.

What’s wrong with today’s DFL is that Democrat politicians’ voices aren’t as powerful, apparently, as the environmental activists’ voices.

It’s time for Dayton, Franken, Klobuchar and Nolan to hold a press conference on the mining issue. It’s time they told the environmental activist wing of the DFL that they’re putting a higher priority on creating high-paying jobs than they’re putting on preserving supposedly pristine wilderness like this:

These environmental activists aren’t fighting to save pristine wilderness. They’re fighting to control people’s lives.

Apparently, these Democrat politicians won’t stand up to them and tell them to take a hike. Apparently, these Democrat politicians think it’s more important to not ruffle the environmental activists’ feathers than it is to create jobs on the Iron Range. (Might that be because they want the environmental activists’ campaign contributions?)

In the end, it’s my opinion that these sorry excuses for politicians will flap their gums for a little while. They won’t ruffle the environmental activists’ feathers. Then they’ll exit stage left (where else?) once people stop paying attention.

They should all be astronomy majors because they’re only good at taking up space. If families want DFL politicians to fight for them, they’re out of luck. These DFL politicians won’t fight for people if they aren’t part of a special interest group.

It’s sad that these DFL politicians will fight for special interest groups but they won’t fight for families. This isn’t Hubert Humphrey’s DFL.

Technorati: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

After writing this post, I read TakeAction Minnesota’s statement to the end. If I hadn’t, I would’ve missed the Democrats’ explanation of the Pelosi/AFSCME PEOPLE defamatory ad:

The ad was edited to fit a standard TV time slot, not to change the content of Mills’ positions on issues.

That’s ridiculous. The Democrats’ ad wasn’t edited. It was spliced together from 3 separate paragraphs to create a sentence Stewart Mills never said. Here’s Dictionary.com’s definition of edit:

to prepare (text) for publication by checking and improving its accuracy, clarity, etc.

This wasn’t editing according to that definition. What the Democrats did didn’t improve Stewart’s statement’s accuracy or clarity. It created a sentence Stewart didn’t say. This is easily illustrated by the fact that the first 10 words of the fictional sentence came from a of the sentence 11 minutes into the video. The next 10 words from the fictional sentence came from a sentence almost 15 minutes into the video. The final 3 words of the fictional sentence came from a sentence 12 minutes into the video.

The first 10 words came from a paragraph talking about the 2012 election. The next 10 words came from a paragraph where Stewart talked about why jobs weren’t getting created on the Range. The final 3 words came from a sentence where Stewart said that he’s personally offended that this Democrat front group called him a deadbeat for not paying his taxes.

When Democrats splice together 3 partial sentences to create a fictional sentence, it’s verifiable proof that Democrats will throw everything at Stewart Mills between today and Election Day. That’s why the Mills campaign put out this e-letter:


Stewart was right when he said that his Democratic opponents “are shameless and they’ll do anything to win.” That’s who they are. They should be forewarned, though, by this sentence:

I won’t belabor the point except to say that now we know how our opponents operate and we are acutely aware of their sleazy tactics.

Stewart knows that the race is at a critical juncture. He won’t hesitate if taking decisive action is required. It’s apparent that he’s trying to get ahead of this problem by revving up his fundraising machine. That way, he’ll have the ammunition to put Ms. Pelosi, Rick Nolan and the Democrat front groups in their place.

It’s one thing to play hardball politics. This isn’t hardball politics. It’s dirty politics. Expect dumptruck loads more of this stuff during the next 3 months.

Technorati: , , , , , , , ,

TakeAction Minnesota’s latest press release instructs the press to investigate Stanley Hubbard:

Statewide people’s organization TakeAction Minnesota, which has offices in Duluth and Grand Rapids, issued the following statement regarding a political TV ad running in the 8th Congressional District which was pulled off the air by Hubbard Broadcasting last week in a flurry of controversy:

“The real story isn’t about Stewart Mills or Rick Nolan. The real story is about corporate conservatives limiting political dialogue and eroding free speech. It’s about a billionaire, Stanley Hubbard, protecting certain candidates who protect wealth at the expense of working people. It’s about corporate conservatives and media conglomerates owned and run by billionaires like Stanley Hubbard and the Koch Brothers protecting candidates for their own economic gain. How concentrated wealth increasingly controls public discourse at the expense of people. You can swap in any corporate conservative candidate you want for Stewart Mills.

“There are several important questions voters and the media should be asking. Why did the ad run in the first place? When and why was it decided that it must be pulled down? Did someone from the Mills campaign see it was running and call in a favor from Hubbard? Did Stanley Hubbard himself see the ad and decide it was damaging to Mills? Did someone from Hubbard’s friends connected to the Koch Brothers decide it needed the ax?

It’s understatement to say that the ad they’re talking about didn’t enhance public dialogue. It’s defamatory and dishonest. Saying that it’s highly edited and spliced is understatement. These 128 words that Stewart Mills said:

What happened in the last round of elections, where you had folks saying that ‘the wealthy, the wealthy are not paying their fair share, that there’s all these loopholes and they don’t pay any taxes and we have to make them pay more. Well, you know what? I’m gonna speak for myself and then I’m going to allude to a few others here. We’ve paid for all of our taxes. We reinvest the money we make into our business.

How come we are not generating the jobs in Northeastern Minnesota that we otherwise would? Well I can tell you why. Because the overwhelming group of people that run businesses, that have the ability to employ people are taxed at that personal rate. They are the villains, they’re the bad guys. They’re the ones that quote are not paying their fair share. They’re the ones quote that ‘the 2%, the 1%, whatever percent you want.

To be singled out as a deadbeat is personally offensive.

turned into this 26-word sentence he didn’t say:

…folks saying that ‘the wealthy, the wealthy are not paying their fair share…the 2%, the 1%, whatever percent you want…is personally offensive.

Next, let’s answer some of TakeAction Minnesota’s questions, starting with this one:

Why did the ad run in the first place?

To smear Stewart Mills. It isn’t a coincidence that this smear campaign started after the DCCC put Nolan on their version of endangered incumbents list and after the Cook Report changed their rating of the race from Leans Democratic to toss-up.

Rick Nolan is a deeply flawed candidate running a terrible, 1-issue race. It isn’t a coincidence that Nolan’s campaign is focusing on Mills “representing the 1-percent.”

Q2: When and why was it decided that it must be pulled down?

After attorneys from the Mills campaign a) notified KSTP and WDIO of the defamatory nature of the ad and b) reminded them that the TV stations weren’t protected from running the ad:

The false ad bankrolled by AFSCME/House Majority PAC against Stewart Mills does not constitute a “candidate use.” Under Columbia Broadcasting Sys., Inc. v. Democratic Nat’l Comm., 412 U.S. 94 (1973), and Nat’l Conservative Political Action Comm., 89 FCC 2d 626 (1982), your station is not obligated to air any advertisements from third parties, such as the AFSMCE/House Majority PAC, as third parties have no guaranteed right of access to air their advertisements on your station. Thus, broadcasting stations are not protected from legal liability for airing a false and misleading advertisement sponsored by the AFSCME/House Majority PAC. Moreover, broadcast licensees have a legal responsibility to review and to eliminate any false, misleading, or deceptive materials contained in advertising.

KSTP and WDIO pulled the ad when they saw that the ad was defamatory and they weren’t protected from having a lawsuit filed against them.

Q3: Did someone from the Mills campaign see it was running and call in a favor from Hubbard?

This is pure speculation intended to take the spotlight off the fact that Rick Nolan didn’t support mining jobs on the Range until the political pressure forced him into supporting creating mining jobs.

It isn’t a DFL conspiracy theory without throwing in this boogeyman:

Did someone from Hubbard’s friends connected to the Koch Brothers decide it needed the ax?

The paranoid rantings and the conspiracy theory just wouldn’t be complete without a reference to the Koch Brothers.

Now it’s time to ask TakeAction Minnesota this straightforward question: How can an organization that’s a major part of the DFL’s messaging and GOTV machine benefit from our nation’s tax laws? After all, TakeAction Minnesota’s facebook page states pretty clearly that they’re a nonprofit. Their member organizations page is filled with DFL front organizations. Their every action is, by Al Franken’s definition, political.

Simply put, TakeAction Minnesota’s public call for an investigation into Stanley Hubbard and the Koch Brothers is both a farce and a gimmick. This DFL front group’s questions are illegitimate because TakeAction Minnesota knows that the Pelosi ad was pulled because it was defamatory.

Technorati: , , , , , , , , ,

While writing this post, I thought about the Democratic Party’s disgusting tactics. First, here’s what caught my attention:

But his billionaire friends at Hubbard Broadcasting won’t air an ad that uses his own words to call him out.

And here’s the kicker: the owner of Hubbard Broadcasting, Stanley Hubbard, is a major donor to Mills’ campaign and a friend of the Koch brothers. When a media station owned by someone who has maxed out to a candidate is keeping voters from knowing where that candidate stands, something’s not right.

TakeAction Minnesota is one of the DFL’s front organizations. They, along with organizations like the Alliance for a Better Minnesota and AFSCME PEOPLE, specialize in smearing Republican candidates. In this instance, they’re unloading both barrels on Stewart Mills.

There’s more to this than just a smear campaign.

That’s bad enough but that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Let’s remember that Al Franken enthusiastically signed a letter to the IRS telling them to crack down on TEA Party organizations. We know that the IRS and other government agencies made life a living hell for Catherine Engelbrecht.

The DFL, like the Democratic Party nationally, is the party that’s deployed ‘weaponized government’ to harass people that don’t agree with them. They used the IRS, OSHA and the ATF to harass TEA Party organizations. They’ve used the EPA to intimidate private property owners.

It isn’t a stretch to think that the DFL might organize a boycott of KSTP. Further, it isn’t a stretch to think that Sen. Franken’s friend Chuck Schumer might ask the FCC to look into KSTP’s broadcast license. They unleashed the IRS against the TEA Party. Why wouldn’t these senators use other government agencies to harass their political enemies?

Just the threat of a boycott by the DFL would have a chilling effect on stations. Having advertisers leave their station because TakeAction Minnesota and other DFL front groups is a threat stations would have to take seriously.

While this would be the first time that TakeAction Minnesota has organized a boycott against a business, it’s old hat for AFSCME:

Last month, Dawn Bobo, owner of Village Dollar Store in Union Grove, Wis., was asked to display a pro-union sign in her window. Ms. Bobo, a self- described conservative Republican, refused and received a letter from the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees asking her to reconsider. “Failure to do so will leave us no choice but do [sic] a public boycott of your business,” the letter said.

It isn’t coincidence that AFSCME PEOPLE (Public Employees Organized to Promote Legislative Equality) is running the same defamatory ad that got pulled from KSTP and WDIO.

Why would anyone think that these thugs wouldn’t attempt to intimidate businesses into not criticizing DFL front groups when they run their smear campaigns? Contrary to Mitt Romney’s statements, these aren’t “nice people we simply disagree with.” These Democratic front groups are despicable, dishonest people that can’t be trusted because they won’t hesitate to use government as a weapon against their political enemies.

Technorati: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

TakeAction Minnesota’s fundraising email is clear proof that DFL front groups a) don’t care about the truth and b) won’t hesitate in smearing anyong they think of as a threat to their power. Here’s their latest fundraising e-letter:

Dear Gary,

In a 2013 speech, 8th district congressional candidate Stewart Mills said that all the talk about the rich not paying their fair share and corporations dodging taxes singled him out as a deadbeat, and was “personally offensive.”

But his billionaire friends at Hubbard Broadcasting won’t air an ad that uses his own words to call him out.

And here’s the kicker: the owner of Hubbard Broadcasting, Stanley Hubbard, is a major donor to Mills’ campaign and a friend of the Koch brothers. When a media station owned by someone who has maxed out to a candidate is keeping voters from knowing where that candidate stands, something’s not right.

We’re getting ready to launch a door-to-door canvass across the district to reach out to voters and give them the facts about where Stewart Mills stands and talk about what really matters to working families.

Mills doesn’t think that he and his fellow millionaires should have to pay more in taxes and he doesn’t support raising the federal minimum wage. Billionaires like Stanley Hubbard shouldn’t get to decide whether or not voters know the truth – but you and I both know that, as long as they own the media, they have an outsized voice in our elections.

That’s where you come in.

Thanks for standing with us,
Dan and the whole TakeAction Minnesota team

Mr. McGrath’s distortions are noteworthy. First, the ad was shut down because the ad, which was initially paid for by Nancy Pelosi’s PAC, is an outright distortion that I wrote about in this article. Here’s what Stewart Mills actually said:

What happened in the last round of elections, where you had folks saying that ‘the wealthy, the wealthy are not paying their fair share, that there’s all these loopholes and they don’t pay any taxes and we have to make them pay more. Well, you know what? I’m gonna speak for myself and then I’m going to allude to a few others here. We’ve paid for all of our taxes. We reinvest the money we make into our business.

How come we are not generating the jobs in Northeastern Minnesota that we otherwise would? Well I can tell you why. Because the overwhelming group of people that run businesses, that have the ability to employ people are taxed at that personal rate. They are the villains, they’re the bad guys. They’re the ones that quote are not paying their fair share. They’re the ones quote that ‘the 2%, the 1%, whatever percent you want.

To be singled out as a deadbeat is personally offensive.

Pelosi’s PAC took those 128 words and turned them into this 26-word sentence:

…folks saying that ‘the wealthy, the wealthy are not paying their fair share…the 2%, the 1%, whatever percent you want…is personally offensive.

Honest, thoughtful people would see that Ms. Pelosi and other Democratic front groups like TakeAction Minnesota didn’t just take Stewart Mills’ words out of context. They spliced his words together to create a sentence he didn’t say.

Minnesota has an option this November. If they vote Democrat, they’re voting for the political party that a) didn’t hesitate in smearing Republicans, b) didn’t hesitate in smearing media companies who have a legal obligation to the public and c) had to run a massive smear campaign on multiple levels because they couldn’t run on their accomplishments.

Here’s KSTP’s legal obligation:

The false ad bankrolled by AFSCME/House Majority PAC against Stewart Mills does not constitute a “candidate use.” Under Columbia Broadcasting Sys., Inc. v. Democratic Nat’l Comm., 412 U.S. 94 (1973), and Nat’l Conservative Political Action Comm., 89 FCC 2d 626 (1982), your station is not obligated to air any advertisements from third parties, such as the AFSMCE/House Majority PAC, as third parties have no guaranteed right of access to air their advertisements on your station. Thus, broadcasting stations are not protected from legal liability for airing a false and misleading advertisement sponsored by the AFSCME/House Majority PAC. Moreover, broadcast licensees have a legal responsibility to review and to eliminate any false, misleading, or deceptive materials contained in advertising.

KSTP and WDIO could’ve kept running Pelosi’s disgustingly dishonest ad…if they wanted to lose a high dollar lawsuit.

That Stan Hubbard has contributed to Republicans isn’t news any more than Alida Messinger contributing to the DFL is news. What’s different here is that this DFL front organization knows the facts behind the Pelosi ad getting tossed. Rather than admitting that Pelosi’s ad is dishonest, TakeAction Minnesota is engaging in a nasty smear campaign against a media outlet they don’t like.

Technorati: , , , , , , , , , , ,

The late Jim Oberstar submitted a bill in 2010 to amend the Clean Water Act so that the EPA would have jurisdiction over every drop of water anywhere in the United States. If you think that’s hyperbole, you’d better think again:

The “waters of the U.S.” issue is back. H. R. 5088, America’s Commitment to Clean Water Act (ACCWA), was recently introduced by House Committee of Transportation Chairman Jim Oberstar (D-Minn.)

Like Oberstar’s previous bill, ACCWA does two things. First, it eliminates the term “navigable” from all sections of the Clean Water Act (CWA). The term “navigable waters of the U.S.” is used more than 80 times in the CWA. NACo continues to oppose the removal of “navigable” from the act, because of the danger its absence poses to years of hard-won jurisdictional parameters.

Second, ACCWA removes the reference to “activities affecting” those waters and redefines “waters of the U.S.” by using a hybrid of current agency regulatory definitions. While ACCWA uses language based on existing agency regulations for a “water of the U.S.,” it is not identical to existing regulations. Furthermore, certain sections of the existing regulations were deleted and new language was added to the “waters of the U.S.” definition in ACCWA.

This is important because Oberstar’s bill didn’t go anywhere in 2010 and because the Obama administration is attempting to implement these changes through an EPA regulation:

Today, Torrey Westrom submitted comments to the Environmental Protection Agency over the EPA’s proposed rule to redefine “waters of the U.S.” – or navigable waters – under the Clean Water Act.

The new rule would redefine navigable waters as any body of water that is adjacent to or near a larger downstream water source, making it subject to federal regulations and permitting. The rule would also allow the EPA to seek comment on other waters, which could later be subject to regulation as well.

Sen. Westrom submitted this comment:

The Environmental Protection Agency’s latest proposal to change the definition of ‘navigable waters’ under the Clean Water Act is a naked attempt to expand their own authority beyond the scope of the law and will have devastating consequences for Minnesota’s farmers, families, land owners and small business owners.

Congress was clear when it passed the Clean Water Act that the EPA’s authority would cover ‘navigable’ waters, but this new rule will extend the EPA’s authority to everything from small ponds to ditches in fields. This is government overreach, pure and simple. Federal officials are throwing the legal definition to the wayside and creating nearly limitless regulatory authority, which will hurt our communities. Any changes should be made through the legislative process, where voters can keep government accountable, rather than through a federal agency’s rule making.

Farmers and small business owners in places like where I live in Elbow Lake, and our surrounding agriculture communities in northwest Minnesota, cannot afford any more burdensome regulations handed down from the federal government. After a historically harsh winter and with a sluggish economy, the last thing America’s agriculture sector needs is unnecessary burden that will stifle business. We know our towns, down to the ponds and ditches in our fields, better than any unelected bureaucrat from Washington.

The EPA should ditch the proposed rule, which will harm farming communities and families.”

This is the key paragraph from Sen. Westrom’s comment:

Congress was clear when it passed the Clean Water Act that the EPA’s authority would cover ‘navigable’ waters, but this new rule will extend the EPA’s authority to everything from small ponds to ditches in fields. This is government overreach, pure and simple. Federal officials are throwing the legal definition to the wayside and creating nearly limitless regulatory authority, which will hurt our communities. Any changes should be made through the legislative process, where voters can keep government accountable, rather than through a federal agency’s rule making.

Democrat front groups are undoubtedly cheering the EPA’s proposed rule. These Democrat front groups, like the Sierra Club, the Nature Conservancy and other like-minded environmental activist organizations want the federal government to have jurisdiction over every drop of water in the US, regardless of whether it’s navigable water that forms the border between Minnesota and Wisconsin or whether it’s a low spot on private property in Idaho that occasionally has water in it.

The Clean Water Act, aka the CWA, specified which waters were covered by the Act. Because the CWA was passed by Congress and signed by the President, the legislation’s scope is limited. If they’d wanted the federal government to control all of the water in the United States, they should’ve written that into the bill. That’s where the Sierra Club’s, the Nature Conservancy’s and the League of Conservation Voters’ plan falls apart.

Had that been written into the text of the CWA, people would’ve been outraged.

Further, the executive branch isn’t allowed to change the clearly written language of a signed bill. Only the legislative branch is allowed to do that. The executive branch’s responsibility is to “faithfully execute” the laws that Congress enacts. If they don’t like specific provisions in a law, their only constitutionally sanctioned option is to talk Congress into changing that language.

Sen. Westrom is right in criticizing the federal government’s plan to govern through executive fiat. This isn’t a kingdom. It’s a constitutional republic with a clearly written Constitution.

Frankly, I don’t care if the EPA likes or hates the CWA. Their chief responsibility isn’t predicated on whether they like or hate a bill. Their chief responsibility is to faithfully execute the laws that are on the books, not the laws they wished were on the books.

Technorati: , , , , , , , , , , ,