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After reading Doug Wardlow’s op-ed, which was published by the Duluth News Tribune, it’s becoming crystal clear that Doug Wardlow would make an outstanding attorney general. It’s equally clear that Keith Ellison isn’t interested in protecting Minnesotans.

In his op-ed, Wardlow highlights his priorities, saying “Meanwhile, even though the attorney general is Minnesota’s chief law enforcement officer, the criminal law division within the office has been ignored and downsized. But Minnesota has statewide problems that need to be tackled, like the terrible sex trafficking that occurs in our state and the opioid epidemic.”

Mike Hatch and Lori Swanson loved paying attention to high profile lawsuits but they didn’t do a good job with crime. It’s apparent that stopping crime and beefing up the criminal division within the OAG will be Wardlow’s highest priority.

Playing politics means fewer resources for law and order and has disastrous results. For example, we know the number of children being trafficked is astronomically high. According to a study, each month in Minnesota, hundreds of children, usually young girls, are trafficked multiple times a day. But the arrests of the human-traffickers behind this great evil are far too low, and the number of convictions of these criminals is even lower.

That’s because county attorneys, on the front lines with local law enforcement, are starved of resources. When it comes to statewide criminal enterprises, our county attorneys need coordination, assistance, and leadership from the state attorney general. That’s why, on day one, I will start rebuilding the office’s criminal law division.

Let’s stop this horrific crime against young girls. It’s long past time to permanently shut this type of crime down.

That won’t be a priority with Keith Ellison. Ellison’s already promised to file lawsuit after lawsuit against President Trump. Stopping sex trafficking isn’t on Ellison’s list of priorities.

It’s time to elect an AG whose priorities include stopping sex trafficking and opioid abuse.

Further, it’s time to reject a politician who can’t control himself:

Keith Ellison’s multiple character flaws are proof that he isn’t fit to be Minnesota’s top law enforcement officer. This weekend, William Davis, his top attack dog, gave us another reason to reject Ellison and end Ellison’s political career.

This weekend, Davis left a nasty reply to this Facebook post:

What a disgusting directive. What’s amazing is that Davis still has a job as I write this article. If a Republican had written this, the MSM would’ve been all over this like white on rice.

Because it was written by a Democrat mobster, the only sound we’ll hear is that of crickets. Like one of my frequent commenters often reminds us, if the Democrats didn’t have double standards, they wouldn’t have any standards. Well put.

The difference between Ellison and Doug Wardlow is starting to show itself. In the next post, I’ll explain why Doug Wardlow needs to be our next AG.

It’s understatement to say that Keith Ellison has chutzpah to spare. This week, Ellison criticized Doug Wardlow for being a mouthpiece for special interest groups while speaking at the Minnesota AFL-CIO headquarters.

While at the AFL-CIO headquarters, Ellison said “The special interests already have high-powered lawyers on their side. They don’t need another one in the Minnesota Attorney General’s Office.”

To his credit, Wardlow hit back hard, saying “Keith Ellison, he wants to talk about anything other than the domestic abuse allegations against him.” With the judge just unsealing Ellison’s divorce records this past Thursday, rest assured that this wasn’t Ellison’s best week in politics ever.

Then again, Ellison hasn’t had many good weeks lately. He certainly didn’t have a great week when Karen Monahan accused him of sexual assault. Ellison definitely didn’t have a great week when various bloggers highlighted the fact that Ellison has frequently supported cop-killers.

Ellison not only supports special interest organizations. He couldn’t thrive without their support.

In the past, Ellison was a politician in the minority, a bomb-thrower. This time, he’s running to become Minnesota’s chief law enforcement officer. John Hinderaker summed things up beautifully in this post, titled “Who wants a pro-crime attorney general”?

If you want a pro-law enforcement attorney general in Minnesota, the only choice is Doug Wardlow:

Click on this link if you want to permanently retire Keith Ellison from politics.

After Jessie van Berkel’s article, Doug Wardlow is going on the offensive in his campaign against Keith Ellison. Wardlow’s campaign is going on the offensive with this ad:

Here’s a partial transcript of Wardlow’s ad:

NARRATOR: Extreme Keith Ellison voted against the Farm Bill and supports radical environmental policies that hurt Minnesota farmers and workers. Extreme Keith Ellison supported cop-killers, open borders and has said he’s against the Second Amendment. Even worse, Extreme Keith Ellison has been accused of domestic violence by multiple women.

Think about this — Keith Ellison wants to be Minnesota’s chief law enforcement officer but he disagrees with the Bill of Rights and he thinks that he can beat up women without getting punished. What type of idiot liberal thinks that makes sense?

Let me rephrase that. What idiot liberal other than the ones serving on the Senate Judiciary Committee thinks that ignoring the Constitution and beating up women is ok? In Karen Monahan’s case, she provided proof of Ellison’s assault. She didn’t wait 30+ years to make the accusation. She immediately reported it to the proper authorities. Medical personnel have verified her injuries.

Keith Ellison is devoid of character plus he thinks he’s above the law. Why would we elect that type of dirtbag? Instead, let’s elect Doug Wardlow. With him, we know he won’t support cop-killers or beat up women.

Thursday night, C-cubed and Red Hat events are holding an event at the Tuscan Center. The subjects for the event will be “Crime & Terrorism A local & National Perspective.” Confirmed to attend are Philip Haney and Dave Bentrud. Mr. Haney is the co-author of the book titled “See Something, Say Nothing.” He is a former whistleblower who worked in the US Department of Homeland Security.

If you don’t know much about him, this article will provide you with a ton of important information about Mr. Haney and the important responsibilities he was tasked with at the DHS.

Haney will provide insights into federal counterterrorism efforts.

Dave Bentrud is currently the Police Commissioner of the Waite Park Police Department. He’s also running to become the next sheriff of Stearns County. Chief Bentrud will provide insights into law enforcement strategies to keep crime as low as possible.

The doors open at 6:30 pm, with Mr. Haney’s presentation starting at 7:00 pm. The crime/law enforcement forum starts at 7:30 pm. PS- This video will help people understand Mr. Haney:

This article has to be seen as helpful to Republicans running for the Minnesota House of Representatives.

According to J. Patrick Coolican’s article, “Recent union endorsements provide clues about the direction of both organized labor and the two parties. The carpenters and their 11,000 Minnesota members endorsed 48 DFL candidates and 30 Republican candidates for the Minnesota House, but the GOP can be happy that incumbents in key swing districts got the nod, like Reps. Sandy Layman, Jim Knob­lach, Randy Jessup and Keith Franke.”

I’m represented by Jim Knoblach so this naturally caught my attention. Jim’s running against Dan Wolgamott, the carpetbagger who got into electoral politics (as near as I can tell anyway) in 2014 when he ran for the seat in HD-14A, which is the west side of St. Cloud, Waite Park and St. Augusta. He was defeated by Tama Theis that year. In 2016, Wolgamott ran for the open Senate seat in SD-14 when John Pederson decided not to seek re-election. In 2016, Wolgamott lost to Jerry Relph, who is now my state senator.

This year, Wolgamott moved to the east side of St. Cloud so he could challenge Jim Knoblach for the HD-14B seat. Apparently, the unions smelled a carpetbagger in Wolgamott and rejected him. It’s also clear that they like Jim Knoblach’s history of supporting projects like the Line3 Pipeline Replacement Project and other projects vital to the construction unions.

Just recently the Minnesota Fraternal Order of Police endorsed Republican state Sen. Karin Housley against U.S. Sen. Tina Smith, and Republican Pete Stauber, a retired police officer, in his race for Congress against Joe Radinovich. The Minneapolis Police Federation endorsed Republican Doug Wardlow in his race for attorney general against U.S. Rep. Keith Ellison.

It isn’t surprising that police don’t like Keith Ellison, especially considering the fact that he’s supported cop killers. That isn’t the only thing that’s hurting Ellison.

Anyone that thinks that Keith Ellison is a law-abiding citizen apparently isn’t paying attention. First, Ellison is credibly accused of physically abusing a recent girlfriend. This is made more credible in the court of public opinion because he’s praised and supported cop-killers in the not-that-distant-past.

In his post, Scott Johnson wrote “Ellison publicly supported the Haaf murder defendants. In February 1993, he spoke at a demonstration for one of them during his trial. Ellison led the crowd assembled at the courthouse in a chant that was ominous in the context of Haaf’s cold-blooded murder: “We don’t get no justice, you don’t get no peace.’ Ellison’s working relationship with Sharif Willis came to an end in February 1995, when Willis was convicted in federal court on several counts of drug and gun-related crimes and sent back to prison for 20 years.” Then Johnson added this:

Ellison’s support for the murderers of Officer Haaf was not a one-off. In February 2000 Ellison spoke at a fundraiser sponsored by the Minnesota chapter of the old National Lawyers Guild, on whose steering committee he had served. The chapter was raising funds for former Symbionese Liberation Army member Kathleen Soliah after her apprehension in St. Paul (under the name “Sara Jane Olson”). The National Lawyers Guild is of course the old Communist front group, though it has survived the fall of the Soviet Union.

In October 2001, Soliah/Olson pleaded guilty to two counts of possessing explosives with intent to commit murder in the long-pending Los Angeles case. In January 2002 Soliah/Olson and four other SLA members were charged with the murder of Myrna Opsahl in Sacramento in the Crocker National Bank case. Soliah/Olson’s participation in the SLA’s Crocker National Bank robbery/murder had long been a matter of public record. Soliah/Olson pleaded guilty to the murder charge in November 2002.

Keith Ellison hasn’t stood with law enforcement in virtually forever. Compare that with this proud endorsement statement of Doug Wardlow:

If we’re electing the chief law enforcement officer in the state, shouldn’t we ignore a candidate who essentially ignores Minnesota’s law enforcement officers? BTW, this isn’t even close to the comprehensive list of cop-killers that Keith Ellison has supported.

Finally, anti-Semitism is a crime, too. There’s no bigger anti-Semite than Louis Farrakhan. Guess what? Keith Ellison and Louis Farrakhan are friends. Surprised? I’m not.

Tim Pawlenty’s flier is causing quite a stir. It’s definitely gotten under the skin of Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey.

The flier “features several uniformed Minneapolis officers standing next to the candidate for governor in front of two squad cars.” Frey “said the mailer may have violated two city policies, calling it an unauthorized use of the Minneapolis police trademark and citing a prohibition on officers other than the union president or a designee appearing in a political advertisement.” That isn’t what’s bothering Frey the most, though.

According to the article, “Tensions are already high among the union, Frey and the City Council. Frey noted that the flier, among other claims, includes Pawlenty’s promise to crack down on so-called “sanctuary” policies meant to separate local police officers from enforcing federal immigration laws.”

“Our policy preventing MPD officers from asking about immigration status is not an advisory guideline that can be selectively ignored,” Frey said. “It is a city law that cannot be reversed by Bob Kroll or any political candidate. They don’t speak for the city. So let me make it clear: Our separation ordinance will be enforced no matter who occupies the office of governor or who is leading the police union.”

Mayor Frey apparently is under the impression that sanctuary city laws are constitutional. If he wants to pick that fight, I’m betting that a Pawlenty administration would be more than happy to have that fight.

Council Member Steve Fletcher said police appearing in the advertisement are “explicitly undermining that separation ordinance,” and questioned whether it would make people less likely to report crimes to police. “We want to preserve the intention that Minneapolis police are acting in accordance with city values,” Fletcher said. “And when they wear the uniform to assert a different set of values, they undermine public trust in their mission.”

The government can’t tell anyone that they can’t express their political opinions. There’s a strong case that can be made that this ordinance violates these officers’ First Amendment rights. Again, I’m betting that a Pawlenty administration would be happy to help with that fight.

In 2006, then-Attorney General Mike Hatch got fined for using official OAG stationery in inviting people to a Hatch for Governor fundraiser. In that case, the candidate used government resources to further his campaign. In this instance, the candidate merely is showing that “Tim Pawlenty is endorsed by the Police Officers Federation of Minneapolis.”

Politically speaking, this is a win-win situation for Pawlenty. It’s a win in the sense that this police officer federation endorsed him. It’s a win because Mayor Frey’s complaint elevates the profile of that flier. Here’s the flier in question:

It’s apparent that Erin Murphy hasn’t thought about crime from a police officer’s perspective. That’s totally apparent after reading this article. First, Jeff Johnson said “I watched the body camera footage from the Thurman Blevins shooting today. It shows clearly that Blevins was carrying a gun and that the Minneapolis officer involved did everything he could to convince Blevins to surrender before firing his weapon. Serving our communities as a police officer is one of the hardest jobs in America today and we shouldn’t second-guess the very difficult decisions they make until we have all of the facts.”

Gov. Pawlenty issued a statement, saying “The actions of the Minneapolis police officers involved in the shooting of Thurman Blevins were clearly appropriate. Police officers protect our communities at extreme risk to themselves every day. We support and appreciate them. Those who claimed Blevins did not have a weapon or that officers acted improperly owe the officers an apology.”

Next, compare those statements with what Erin Murphy said:

As I watched the body camera footage of Thurman Blevins death, I was struck not only by the end of his life and the hard questions it raises, but by the beginning of the video. From the first moment officers are on scene they are loudly swearing, and threatening a man who appears to be sitting on a curb with a woman and child. From the first moment the police are shouting, scaring him, pushing him, and engaging in a way that led to the awful ending of his life.

He ran, yes. He was armed, yes. He reportedly was drunk and had fired shots, yes. All of those things might have led to his death, but none of them had to. I don’t understand why calmly starting a conversation wasn’t an option or wouldn’t have been a better course.

I don’t know much about Thurman Blevins. Had the officers approached the situation differently he might be in jail right now for firing his weapon into the sky and ground, or could be sitting on that curb with his family enjoying a morning off. I don’t know.

When a man (or woman) wields a gun, that officer has a responsibility to protect himself/herself and their partner. That isn’t a situation where the officers have a ton of options. It’s literally a kill-or-be-killed situation.

Notice how Rep. Murphy blames the officers, not Mr. Blevins. Rep. Murphy, if you were faced with this life-or-death situation, would you take a pacifist’s approach? Would you let a person who has a gun wave it around? If that’s truly what you’d do, there’s a high probability that you’d be shot. Further, by taking the pacifist’s approach, you’d put your partner’s life in jeopardy, too.

This story is troubling:

More protests are expected in Minneapolis over the decision not to charge officers involved in the June 23 deadly shooting of Thurman Blevins. The two Minneapolis officers involved say he pointed a gun at them during a short chase. CBS News’ Dean Reynolds spoke to Blevins’ sister and cousin who dispute the officers’ version of events. Blevins’ sister Darlynn and cousin Sydnee Brown admitted he had a gun on him but say he was scared for his life when he ran from police.

“It was the way that they approached him when they came out of the vehicle,” Darlynn said. “I mean, who else is not going to run if somebody is behind me telling me ‘I’m going to shoot you. I’m going to kill you.'”

First, here’s the police body cam video:

Then there’s this interview of Blevins’ family:

Let’s state something here emphatically. Gov. Dayton’s reckless statements after the Philando Castile shooting contribute each day to the tension between minority communities and police officers. Gov. Dayton said that “Would this have happened if those passengers, the driver were white? I don’t think it would have.” Since that day, tensions have escalated. Rep. Murphy’s statements just further escalate the tensions.

That’s inexcusable.

The St. Cloud Times’ Nora Hertel should be applauded for applying an excruciating amount of scrutiny during Keith Ellison’s visit to St. Cloud this week. It’s a safe bet he won’t grant her an exclusive interview after she put the screws to Mr. Ellison. Check this out.

For instance, we found out that “Ellison told a friendly audience in St. Cloud [aka CAIR-MN] that it’s difficult to get legislation passed in Washington D.C. now, while state attorneys general are on the front lines of protecting people’s rights.”

Later, we found out that Ellison “shared his platform and took questions from the small group Friday at New York Gyro on Third Street North. Ellison has served in Congress for 12 years and practiced law long before that.” Still later, when asked about his views on law enforcement, Ellison replied that “Like fire service and public utilities, public safety services should be delivered fairly, Ellison said. He supports a number of reforms including: allowing felons to vote, decriminalizing marijuana, training police on de-escalation and implicit bias. He supports drug courts and wants to treat addiction as a medical, rather than a law enforcement, problem.”

In other words, Ellison’s priority would be to teach the police to stop being racists and to stop shooting innocent minorities when these minorities are given fair, specific instructions by law enforcement officers.

According to the Kirwan Institute, the definition of implicit bias “refers to the attitudes or stereotypes that affect our understanding, actions, and decisions in an unconscious manner. These biases, which encompass both favorable and unfavorable assessments, are activated involuntarily and without an individual’s awareness or intentional control. Residing deep in the subconscious, these biases are different from known biases that individuals may choose to conceal for the purposes of social and/or political correctness. Rather, implicit biases are not accessible through introspection.”

Let’s understand this. Implicit bias resides “deep in the subconscious”, meaning that they “aren’t accessible through introspection.” Further, these biases “are activated involuntarily and without an individual’s awareness or intentional control.”

If we don’t know that these traits exist and they’re “activated involuntarily”, how are we supposed to prevent them? That’s assuming that they actually exist, which I’m skeptical of, at least to the extent that Mr. Ellison says they exist.

Left out of Ms. Hertel’s article is Mr. Ellison’s extensive (and disturbing) interview with radical Rabbi Michael Lerner:

Treating Ellison like he’s just another political candidate ignores Mr. Ellison’s support of cop killers. In his past, Ellison has questioned detectives investigating cop killers like Kathleen Soliah:

At the event, Ellison told the Pioneer Press he believed the prosecution of Olson was political. In his speech, Ellison noted he didn’t know much about the SLA and he thought Olson was being prosecuted in the court of public opinion because of some of her political beliefs.

“I’m a supporter of anybody who’s subject to political prosecution based on their being in a vilified group,” he told the Pioneer Press. “Your chances of getting a fair trial are low. I’ve been waiting for the evidence against her. I don’t think they would not cheat to prosecute this woman.”

Here’s what he said about Assata Shakur and Bernadine Dohrn:

Ellison also spoke favorably of convicted cop killer Assata Shakur and expressed his opposition to any attempt to extradite her to the United States from Cuba, where she had fled after escaping prison.

“I am praying that Castro does not get to the point where he has to really barter with these guys over here because they’re going to get Assata Shakur, they’re going to get a whole lot of other people,” Ellison said at the event, which also included a silent auction and speech by former Weather Underground leader Bernardine Dohrn. “I hope the Cuban people can stick to it, because the freedom of some good decent people depends on it.”

Summarizing, Ellison thinks that cop killers are misunderstood civil rights heroes and that police officers are racists. Is that the type of man we want leading law enforcement? Is that the type of man we want harassing law enforcement? I don’t think so.