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In his campaign to become the next chair of the DNC, Rep. Keith Ellison wrote this op-ed, which Time Magazine published. It’s a publication from La-La-Land.

For instance, Rep. Ellison wrote “Take labor protection and environmentalism, two core Democratic values. Republicans claim you can’t both have clean air and grow jobs. This too is a false choice.
Unions and environmental groups recognized this ten years ago when they formed the Blue-Green Alliance to build a clean, fair economy for all. You don’t often think ‘environmentalist’ when you hear ‘steelworker.’ But David Foster, their first Executive Director, left his post with United Steelworkers District 11 in Minnesota to take on the task of bridging the divides he often saw with environmental advocates. In fact, the two current co-chairs are Leo W. Gerard, the International President of the United Steelworkers, and Michael Brune, the Executive Director of the Sierra Club. The Democratic Party needs to follow the lead of folks like David, Leo and Michael by showing where we can find common ground and standing up to attempts to drive us apart.”

While it’s true that union leadership signed off on this coalition, the rank-and-file didn’t. That’s why President Trump won the votes of tons of white working class voters. There are a handful of union leaders, compared with hundreds of thousands of union workers. It isn’t difficult to do the math.

Rep. Ellison didn’t help the Democrats’ cause when he wrote “We are the party that fights to raise the minimum wage, guarantee high-quality education, and provide affordable health care.” Blue collar workers are infinitely more worried about creating high-paying job than they’re worried about raising the minimum wage. The minimum wage simply isn’t a rallying cry.

What we need is a Democratic Party that is willing to listen to everyone and organize conversations that bring people together.

This is coming from the party that’s shouted down dissenting voices like Bill Kristol, Ann Coulter and other conservatives. This is coming from the party whose activists blocked traffic (multiple times) on major Minnesota highways. That’s rich.

It’s who we are. And it’s how we take our country back.

Here’s the truth: It isn’t the Democrats’ country anymore. Their contamination is pretty much restricted to areas of urban blight and college campuses. Finding Democrats in rural areas is as easy as finding capitalists in Vermont and Massachusetts.

By not confirming President Trump’s national security team the first day in office, Democrats are signaling that their resistance, aka their political stunt, takes precedence over national security. That’s a disgusting signal to send.

It’s one thing to not confirm Rex Tillerson immediately. There were legitimate questions about him. It’s quite another to not confirm Jeff Sessions as AG or Mike Pompeo as the director of the CIA. There weren’t any questions about whether Mssrs. Sessions and Pompeo were qualified.

Michelle Goldberg of Slate Magazine insists that “The Trump Resistance will be led by angry women.” That’s possible, though I’m a bit skeptical of that prediction. Right now, it’s being run by idiots like Chuck Schumer, Keith Ellison and Hollywood ‘stars’ like Madonna and Ashley Judd.

Why would anyone think that (I’m stealing a phrase from Rush Limbaugh) this “endless parade of human debris” is the Democrats’ ticket back into America’s hearts? Salena Zito’s column says that President Trump needs to start healing this nation’s divisions. I’d love to see it, though I can’t picture Democrats being a willing partner anytime soon. I can’t picture that after watching this video:

It’s time for Sen. Schumer, House Minority Leader Pelosi, Rep. Ellison and their legion of parasites to stop with the PR stunts and start putting America’s needs first. They can start by telling Sen. Schumer to stop resisting and start confirming President Trump’s nominees to lead his national security team:

To Sen. Schumer: Enough with the shenanigans. Start putting America first for a change.

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It isn’t surprising that the AP is reporting that Keith Ellison will miss Friday’s inauguration of President-Elect Donald Trump. That’s as surprising as reports that Donald Trump is rich.

What makes this information newsworthy, in my opinion, is Rep. Ellison’s statement on why he isn’t attending. The AP quotes him as saying “I will not celebrate a man who preaches a politics of division and hate.”

Presumably, that’s said after offering the ‘I supported Louis Farrakhan’ exemption. This article hits Ellison right between the eyes, saying “In Ellison’s attempt to distance himself from past actions and move up in the Democratic Party he has said that he has ‘long denounced’ Farrakhan and called him ‘a hater,’ but Muhammad said that this is not the Ellison that he knew. Muhammad said that he met with Ellison personally during his years of association with the Nation of Islam and that there was ‘no question’ that Ellison, who at the time went by Keith Ellison-Muhammad, supported Farrakhan’s work.”

This might be the most lucid thing David Schultz has said as a political commentator:

Schultz says the last time the United States had a significant number of lawmakers boycott the presidential inauguration was in March 1861 when Abraham Lincoln took the oath of office. Schultz adds boycotting Trump is a win-win for Ellison specifically because his district is so overwhelming only democratic and because of his goals to become the next Democratic Committee Chair. “I suspect by boycotting this he integrates himself with the real liberals of the party and with the people who are saying what the Democrats really need to do is fight,” said Schultz.

Democrats come across as petty by skipping the inauguration:

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This Washington Post article didn’t highlight what’s actually happening. Abby Phillip’s article starts by saying “A public feud between Donald Trump and Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) seemed to jettison any lingering hopes that the inauguration would temporarily ease partisanship in Washington and instead threatened to widen the rift between the two parties.”

What’s actually happening is that the most hyper-partisan parts of the Democratic Party have jettisoned any spirit of bipartisanship. People like Sen. Manchin will be just fine. In Washington, DC, Rep. Lewis is seen exclusively as a civil rights hero. He’s certainly earned that distinction. Outside the Beltway, though, he’s seen as a partisan hack with a short list of accomplishments. When he told NBC’s Chuck Todd that he didn’t think that Mr. Trump was a legitimate president and that he wouldn’t attend Mr. Trump’s inauguration, he solidified that image. He did nothing to soften his image as a partisan. This video will become what a new generation of Americans will think of Rep. Lewis:

The truth is that the hardline left (think Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Harry Reid, Keith Ellison, John Lewis, John Conyers and Nancy Pelosi) has become totally unhinged. They aren’t capable of rational thinking at this point. When that’s the leadership of the Democratic Party, bipartisanship is virtually impossible. What’s yet to be determined is whether the DLC wing of the Democratic Party will reassert itself and save the Democratic Party from itself. At this point, I’ll predict that will happen but not until after a lengthy civil war for the soul of the Democratic Party.

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This article contains one of the most stunning political quotes I’ve ever read. When I first read it, I immediately reread it to make sure I didn’t misread it.

According to the article, Reps. Keith Ellison, (D-MN), Raul Grijalva, (D-AZ), and Mark Pocan, (D-WI), sent a letter to the Democratic Policy and Communications Committee, saying “As our party deliberates on how best to move forward, the Congressional Progressive Caucus encourages our colleagues to move beyond misguided debates such as whether to aggressively court blue-collar, rural, and inland voters or instead focus on professional, urban, and coastal Democrats.”

As a Republican, I wholeheartedly agree. Aggressively courting blue collar and rural voters is a waste of time for Democrats. Everyone’s seen pictures of the red county-blue county maps. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that 98% of the Democratic Party lives either on the East or Left Coast, big cities or college campuses.

I wrote this post to highlight how much Democrats are in denial after the election. Couple that with this trio’s letter and Corey Booker’s publicity stunt today at Jeff Session’s confirmation hearing and it’s clear that they aren’t willing to stop relying on identity politics or to admit that the Democratic Party is, right now, a niche party. Here’s the video of Booker’s ‘testimony’:

The truth is that Sen. Booker didn’t add anything substantial to the confirmation hearing. This was him taking the opportunity to grab some spotlight to further his presidential ambitions. He came across as a phony. His ‘testimony’ was contrived and poorly delivered. He came across, too, as another windbag politician lacking in sincerity. Finally, his about-face on what he said about being honored to have worked with Sen. Sessions makes him look like a cheap politician.

But I digress. I hope these Democrats keep thinking that they don’t have to moderate their positions. I hope they think the Obama coalition is all they need. That’s how they dug this hole in the first place.

Years ago, the joke was that the most dangerous place to be in Washington, DC was between Sen. Schumer and either a microphone or a TV camera. The truth is that he’s a politician with an oversized ego (by politicians’ standards) who’s about to get trampled by a guy with a 140-character megaphone.

Sen. Schumer talks tough but he isn’t tough. Since taking office as the Senate Minority Leader for at least the next 8 years, he’s talked about delaying the confirmation hearings for 8 of President-Elect Trump’s cabinet officers. This past week, he said that he’d do whatever it takes to stop the confirmation of Trump’s Supreme Court nominee. It’s time for him to sit down and shut up. He’s enhancing his reputation as a blowhard.

Sen. Schumer’s recent appearance on Rachel Maddow’s show didn’t hurt his reputation with the far left. While appearing on Maddow’s show, Sen. Schumer said he’d do his best “to hold the seat open.” That’s coming from a guy who’s insisting on people in his political mainstream. Don’t forget that he’s endorsed Keith Ellison to be the next chairman of the DNC. Ellison isn’t known for being a moderate, meaning we shouldn’t trust Sen. Schumer’s definition of mainstream. Apparently, Sen. Schumer’s definition of mainstream is someone from the far left.

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Keith Ellison is hoping to turn his support of Bernie Sanders, then Hillary Clinton, into a winning message in his bid to become the next chairman of the Democratic National Committee (DNC). At this point, outsiders think Rep. Ellison is the leader to succeed Debbie Wasserman-Schultz as the full-time chair of the DNC. Whether DNC insiders think that is another matter.

Outsiders think that he’s the leader because he’s been endorsed by “Harry M. Reid (NV), who announced his support on Sunday, and Reid’s expected successor, Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-NY). On Monday, Ellison’s list of endorsers also included Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), Sen. Chris Murphy (D-CT), Rep. Raúl Grijalva (D-AZ), Rep. G.K. Butterfield (D-NC), Rep. Joseph Crowley (D-NY) and New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman.”

The article portrays Ellison as a team player, saying “Longtime Clinton aide Neera Tanden, who runs the Center for American Progress, a liberal think tank, worked with Ellison to help draft the Democratic Party’s platform in meetings where she represented Clinton and he Sanders. “I saw him as a very constructive voice in the platform process. And it was very apparent he was working hard to unite the party,” said Tanden, who is staying neutral in the DNC Chair race and not endorsing any candidate.”

I don’t doubt that Ellison has the ability to unite the Democratic Party. That isn’t the Democratic Party’s problem. The Democrats’ biggest problem is that they’re far off the left end. Their other major problem is that they’ll do anything that the environmental activist wing of the Democratic Party wants. That why they’ve alienated blue collar workers like miners and pipeline builders. Until blue collar Democrats insist that the Democratic Party incorporate their agenda into the Party’s agenda, they should make clear that their votes will go to the party that listens to them. Period.

Politics should be, to a certain extent, about which party has actually listened to that constituent group. On that note, it’s impossible to picture Keith Ellison guiding the Democratic Party to be ideologically inclusive. It isn’t difficult picturing the DNC being more ideologically rigid under Ellison, though.

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Salena Zito’s article turns the spotlight on the MSM, aka the Agenda Media, to highlight why the media got this election badly wrong. Early in the article, Salena wrote about the NY Times, saying “Take The New York Times’ public editor’s laudable call for more diversity in the newsroom. ‘The executive editor, Dean Baquet, is African-American,’ Liz Spayd wrote. ‘The other editors on his masthead are white. The staff with the most diversity? The news assistants, who mostly do administrative jobs and get paid the least.'”

Then she made the important recommendation (I’d argue it’s essential) that reporters “need more people who come from a blue-collar background, who perhaps didn’t go to Brown and can be found in a pew on Sunday on a fairly regular basis.”

Yesterday, I wrote this post to highlight the absurdity of E.J. Dionne’s column. He’s totally certain that a Trump administration will be a disaster with a silver lining for Democrats. Last night, on the Kelly File, Nomiki Konst ‘debated’ Marc Thiessen and Guy Benson about whether Democrats were learning the lesson of this election. Konst insisted that it was all drive about the economy.

While there’s no doubt lots of people voted for Donald Trump because they think a billionaire might know a thing or 2 about reviving this pathetic recovery, it’s more than that. Mr. Trump promises to clean up the VA scandal, build a wall on the US-Mexican border, simplify the federal tax system and rein in the out-of-control EPA. In other words, he promised to make their lives better.

Voters didn’t just reject Mrs. Clinton’s message. In battleground state after battleground state, they essentially said ‘are you out of your flipping mind? We’ve suffered through 8 years of this crap and we’re tired of it.’ But I digress.

Benson and Thiessen both talked about how the Democratic Party is incapable of talking to people of faith or blue collar workers. It’s clear that they haven’t learned their lesson because the people who are the 2 ‘finalists’ for DNC chair, Keith Ellison and Thomas Perez, are incapable of connecting with those voters.

Paul Krugman thinks the Trump economic policies will tank. Thomas Friedman thinks that the Obama administration is the best friend Israel has ever had. Other inside-the-Beltway columnists missed the fact that miners and farmers are fed up with the EPA’s regulatory overreach.

It isn’t surprising why some of the biggest punchlines in Mr. Trump’s stump speeches were criticisms of the corrupt media. That was a galvanizing message. It’s what tied the blue collar workers together with the millionaires who built their companies from the ground up.

The journalist who didn’t miss what was happening this election was Salena Zito. This video illustrates why Salena got it right:

This weekend, I spoke with Ed Morrissey. Admittedly, neither of us predicted Trump winning. We both, however, gave Trump a shot at winning going into Election Night. When I told Ed that the common denominator for both of us is that we both listened to Salena Zito, he quickly agreed. We didn’t know that he’d win Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin but we knew that Trump’s message resonated with those economically disenfranchised voters.

If newsrooms don’t start sending their reporters out into the real world, if they don’t put a high priority on building a newsroom with cultural diversity, they’ll continue missing the big stories.

Finally, it’s time to thank Salena for her fantastic reporting. If she doesn’t win a slew of awards for her political reporting, it’ll prove that political editors are clueless.

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Prior to this op-ed, I thought that the Democrats most prone to delusion lived in fever swamps with Keith Ellison, Nancy Pelosi and Babs Boxer as neighbors. Thanks to Stan Greenberg’s op-ed, I have to consider the possibility that the entire Democratic Party is nuts.

Greenberg’s op-ed starts by saying “President Obama will be remembered as a thoughtful and dignified president who led a scrupulously honest administration that achieved major changes.” I’d use lots of terms to describe the Obama administration but scrupulously honest isn’t one of them. Fast and Furious was the personification of dishonesty. Weaponizing the IRS to harass TEA Party organizations isn’t the picture of scrupulously honest, either. Unanimously getting shot down 13 straight times by the Supreme Court for his attempts at executive supremacy doesn’t say scrupulously honest. It says President Obama didn’t respect the rule of law.

Later, Greenberg said that President Obama “rescued an economy in crisis and passed the recovery program, pulled America back from its military overreach, passed the Affordable Care Act and committed the nation to addressing climate change.”

First, President Obama didn’t rescue “an economy in crisis.” TARP, passed during President Bush’s term, started the stabilization. The Federal Reserve’s Quantitative Easing, not President Obama’s stimulus, injected life into the economy. Pulling “America back from its military overreach” created ISIS, which is expanding its lethality each day.

The American people aren’t stupid. They tried telling President Obama that they didn’t want Obamacare. He didn’t care. Ideology demanded that it be passed so the Democrats lied about it, then passed it. The next election, the American people threw a beat-down on the Democrats’ agenda. Still, President Obama wouldn’t listen. Eventually, he said he’d get things done with a pen and a phone.

President Obama’s outright disrespect for the Constitution and the rule of law got people upset with Democrats. That’s why they’re on the outside looking in. Half of the states have a Republican governor and Republican legislatures. In DC, there’s a Republican waiting to be sworn in as the next president and Republican majorities in the House and Senate.

That type of repudiation doesn’t happen to “thoughtful and dignified presidents.” It happens to despots who ignore the Constitution and the American people. That’s President Obama’s identity.

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Josh Kraushaar’s article for the National Journal contains some early observations on the 2018 elections for the House and Senate. I agree with Kraushaar when he said “If Trump struggles in of­fice and Demo­crats be­ne­fit as the op­pos­i­tion party, their odds of win­ning a Sen­ate ma­jor­ity would still be nearly im­possible. A mere eight Sen­ate Re­pub­lic­ans are fa­cing reelec­tion in 2018, and six of them are run­ning in the most con­ser­vat­ive states in the coun­try. Sen­ate Demo­crats need to pick up three seats to re­take the ma­jor­ity, which would re­quire de­fend­ing all 11 of their vul­ner­able mem­bers while de­feat­ing someone like Ted Cruz in Texas or Bob Cork­er in Ten­ness­ee. Don’t bet on it.”

It’s pretty obvious that Democrats have no chance of winning back the US Senate. The only chance Ted Cruz has of not being the junior senator from Texas is if he’s confirmed as a Supreme Court justice. I sorta agree with Kraushaar when he says “House Demo­crats would be well-po­si­tioned to take ad­vant­age—if they re­cruit ef­fect­ively and of­fer a more mod­er­ate im­age than they’ve presen­ted in re­cent years. They need to pick up 24 seats to re­gain the ma­jor­ity, around the same num­ber of Re­pub­lic­ans who are rep­res­ent­ing con­gres­sion­al seats that Clin­ton car­ried.”

Let’s be clear about something. The chances of Nancy Pelosi recruiting moderates is virtually nonexistent. The odds of House Democrats putting together an appealing message for America’s Heartland is significantly less than the odds Nancy Pelosi will recruit moderates. The Keith Ellison/Bernie Sanders/Elizabeth Warren wing of the Democratic Party would throw a hissy fit.

Demo­crats, however, are learn­ing all the wrong les­sons from the elec­tion res­ults. They just reelec­ted Pelosi as their lead­er even though she’s one of the party’s most un­pop­u­lar fig­ures—and has served as a mas­cot to rally Re­pub­lic­an voters over the last six years. In­stead of treat­ing the House like a win­nable goal, they’re com­plain­ing about ger­ry­mandered dis­tricts and fo­cus­ing more on the 2022 elec­tions (the first elec­tion, post-re­dis­trict­ing) than the pro­spect of win­ning a ma­jor­ity in two years. They’re lean­ing more on Bernie Sanders and Eliza­beth War­ren for their mes­saging, even though the sen­at­ors’ so­cial­ist rhet­or­ic is tox­ic in the very dis­tricts that House Demo­crats need to flip.

Under Ms. Pelosi’s leadership, Democrats never miss an opportunity to miss an opportunity. Under Ms. Pelosi’s leadership, Democrats couldn’t find the mainstream of American politics with a year’s supply of gas and a GPS. Thanks to Under Ms. Pelosi’s leadership, Democrats view Rust Belt voters as aliens from a strange planet.

Finally, there’s this:

Demo­crats have been so ob­sessed with dis­trict lines be­ing their biggest obstacle to vic­tory that they’ve neg­lected to real­ize their mes­sage is badly out of sync with the very voters they need to win.

It’s impossible to learn from a professor you refuse to attend. Democrats think it’s an enthusiasm problem. It’s actually a credibility/integrity problem.

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