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The man that wrote this LTE, Brian Marsh, gives idiots a bad reputation. It’s stunning to think that Democrats think people are that stupid.

Marsh started his LTE by saying “Stewart Mills III, in talking about the Second Amendment, was quoted in the Dispatch as proclaiming: ‘It is an inalienable right given to us by God.'” Marsh then follows that up by saying “Nowhere in the Bible I read is there any mention of God addressing the topic of a right to gun ownership, and, the last time I checked, God did not write our Constitution or its amendments.”

First, Mills is right. The right to defend ourselves is as old as the Bible. The Declaration of Independence introduces the concept that our rights come from “Nature’s God”, not governments. It’s stunning that Marsh finds this concept radical. It’s been part of our nation’s foundation since 1776.
Then Marsh said this:

It’s sad to see someone so desperate for power that he will resort to fabricating his own “facts” in order to achieve it.

What’s sad is seeing how little Democrats know about the Constitution. Stewart Mills understands the Constitution. He isn’t making things up.

It’s also apparent that Marsh’s goal is to deflect attention away from Rick Nolan. Nolan wants this race to be about ‘Mills the One-Percenter’. Nolan doesn’t want this election to highlight Nolan’s time as a career politician. Nolan doesn’t want voters in the Eighth District to notice that he supports Resolution 54, the DFL’s anti-mining resolution, which I wrote about here:

Specifically, Resolution 54 says “Oppose sulfide ore mining, which is significantly different from taconite mining, poses unacceptable environmental risks, threatens multiple watersheds (Lake Superior, BWCA/VNP, Mississippi) and should not be allowed in the sulfur-bearing rock of Minnesota.”

Rick Nolan is a career politician who will say anything to stay in power. He isn’t about solving problems. He’ll say anything that will keep him in DC.

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It’s amazing that the Duluth News Tribune, aka the DNT, endorsed Republican Rob Farnsworth to replace Carly Melin to represent the people of Nashwauk, Keewatin, Chisholm and Buhl in the Minnesota House of Representatives.

DNT’s endorsement wasn’t tepid, either, stating “he’s also the best bet for effective, strong leadership in St. Paul. Far from an ideologue, he’s an independent thinker with clear goals and specific priorities who’d work for all, not just a party.”

Farnsworth talked about the thing that Ken Martin, Rick Nolan and the DFL don’t want to talk about, saying “The DFL that most Iron Rangers are voting for hasn’t existed for 20 years. The DFL in the Twin Cities that has taken over the DFL in Minnesota, wants to end mining. At their convention and then again at their executive board meeting in the Twin Cities, they tried to pass an anti-mining resolution that I believe will be passed in November because they just pushed it down (the road). This is not a group that is in favor of mining.”

This is the strongest statement by the DNT Editorial Board in the endorsement article:

No matter what political affiliation, Farnsworth rises to the top of this three-way race with a stronger grasp of the issues facing Minnesotans and our Legislature and with his clearly stated and specific goals. They include improving the Iron Range and Minnesota economies by growing jobs; educational plans that make sense for all students; and transportation projects that benefit the greatest number of Minnesotans, meaning more bridge and highway work instead of massive light-rail projects in the Twin Cities that don’t even promise to take cars off the congested roads.

Farnsworth made a ton of sense when he said this:

“With the metro DFL attacking mining, attacking our way of life on the Iron Range, I’m not sure that my kids are going to be able to stay here and raise their family here if that’s what they want to do,” Farnsworth said. “That’s why I’m running for this seat.”

It’s time for the Range to reject the DFL. The metro DFL’s priorities aren’t the Range’s priorities.

Technorati: Rob Farnsworth, Duluth News Tribune, Endorsement, Mining, Iron Range, Transportation, MNGOP, Rick Nolan, Metrocrats, Environmental Activists, DFL, Election 2016

I’ve always thought that Dan Wolgamott was overrated as a candidate. A visit to his campaign website, especially Wolgamott’s issues page, identifies him as a cookie-cutter DFL candidate. There’s nothing about him that makes people think that he’s leadership material. A quick perusal of Mr. Wolgamott’s About Me page paints the picture of a family guy, active in the community and who is active at church.

Wolgamott said that “Additionally, I am an active member of my church here in St. Cloud where I teach Sunday School!” He also highlighted the fact that he enjoys “working with local youth and helping them learn essential life values including teamwork and leadership.”

That’s the public/PR spin side of Mr. Wolgamott. To steal a phrase from Paul Harvey, here’s “the rest of the story” about Dan Wolgamott. Apparently, Mr. Wolgamott has another side to his personality that he’d rather keep hidden. They say that a picture is worth a thousand words. In this instance, though, these screen captures are devastating politically:

With all due respect to Mr. Wolgamott, Sunday school teachers shouldn’t be talking on their Facebook pages about manginas. They shouldn’t be saying that their pizza party would “be more pleasurable than a night in the sack with Maas’s mom.”

That’s the type of language that only perverts use.

UPDATE: The night in the sack comment was made in 2010, not 2014. The mistake was unintentional. Nonetheless, it’s something that he shouldn’t have said. I’ve deleted the reference to 2014 from the post.

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It isn’t a secret that I don’t like Paul Thissen. I find him to be a man of little character but 2 faces. He’s also a political hack. This post will highlight Rep. Thissen’s character flaws. This post will highlight what he’s done recently in private vs. what he’s said publicly.

This post will highlight some of the behind-the-scenes things that caused Gov. Dayton to announce that there won’t be a special session this fall. This article’s quotes of Speaker Daudt highlight Rep. Thissen’s lack of integrity. For instance, Speaker Daudt said “I’m particularly disappointed that Minority Leader Thissen refused to meet two days ago, and refused to even provide his availability to schedule a meeting with Governor Dayton and legislative leaders.” It’s impossible to negotiate with someone who won’t even schedule a negotiating session.

Rep. Thissen sang a different tune in this article, though:

Thissen, a DFLer from Minneapolis, said it was “House Republicans that didn’t really want to get a special session done. This Legislature proved it can’t function. I think they proved that back in May,” Thissen said. “I don’t think we gain anything (politically) by not getting a special session.”

What this past session proved is that the legislature doesn’t function properly if the Minority Leader is frequently attempting to sabotage good-faith attempts to accomplish things. Rep. Thissen fit that role perfectly.

Rep. Thissen has a history of not working well with others. This past May, 7 Republicans wrote a letter to Rep. Thissen. One of the things they said was “Throughout this session, we have witnessed a disturbing pattern of verbal abuse of Republican Staff by you on the floor of the House of Representatives.” A day later, Rep. Thissen apologized, which I wrote about in this post.

Shortly after becoming Speaker in 2015, Speaker Daudt negotiated an agreement between Sen. Bakk and Gov. Dayton. At the time, Gov. Dayton said “I’m confronted with two hostile bodies of the Legislature, one with a leader I believe I can trust (Republican House Speaker Kurt Daudt) and one I know I can’t trust.” That’s something that the Twin Cities media praised Speaker Daudt for.

In May, 2015, Speaker Daudt and Sen. Bakk worked out a bipartisan budget agreement in an afternoon after spending the entire last full week of the session negotiating with Gov. Dayton. Despite all that proof that Speaker Daudt is a tough, fair negotiator, Rep. Thissen wants us to believe that Speaker Daudt isn’t interested in making a deal.

Still, we’re supposed to believe Rep. Thissen when he says that Speaker Daudt didn’t want to negotiate in good faith to get a bonding bill and a tax relief bill signed? Why should we trust Rep. Thissen considering all the scandalous things he’s done?

I’ll trust Speaker Daudt because he’s got a lengthy history of negotiating in good faith. I won’t trust Rep. Thissen because he’s got a lengthy history of undermining good faith negotiations for purely partisan reasons.

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In 2015, GOP Speaker Kurt Daudt and DFL Senate Majority Leader Tom Bakk put together a bipartisan budget agreement. The problem that time was that Minnesota’s other political odd couple, Gov. Mark Dayton and DFL Rep. Paul Thissen, combined to sabotage that bipartisan budget agreement. It isn’t unlike the DFL’s sabotaging of the bonding bill this session.

According to this article, “legislative and executive branch staff members [will] gather to discuss bringing legislators back this fall” this morning.

Gov. Dayton, as usual, is acting like a petulant child. This time, he said that the transportation projects in the bonding bill “were selected based on this year’s GOP election needs instead of following a list of the most-needed work as determined by his Minnesota Department of Transportation.” Gov. Dayton knows that a number of the projects specifically put into the bill were picked because the highways were among the most dangerous highways in Minnesota.

While they’re campaigning, Republicans should remind voters that the DFL put a higher priority on funding the Southwest Light Rail project than they put on middle class tax relief. The DFL voted for the Republicans’ Tax Bill but they certainly didn’t fight for it. Let Gov. Dayton criticize Republicans about which transportation projects should’ve been included in the bonding bill. Republicans can counter that by saying that they fought for funding to fix the most dangerous stretches of highway in Minnesota. Then they can remind people that they’re the party that fought for middle class tax relief.

The DFL isn’t in great position going into this election. Many of their mailers talk about bringing people together and how they need a majority in the House and Senate to pass their ultra-liberal agenda. This is my first prediction of the season. Republicans will maintain their majority in the House this election.

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It’s indisputable that Gov. Dayton fights harder for golden parachutes for his political appointees than he’s fought for tax relief for farmers, veterans, students with student loan debt and small business owners. In fact, it’s indisputable that Gov. Dayton and the DFL have fought hard to increase commissioners’ pay.

Think about this: Gov. Dayton and the DFL passed legislation that gave Gov. Dayton’s commissioners pay raises that sometimes exceeded $30,000 a year. Then Gov. Dayton illegally gave 3 of his political appointees more than $75,000 in severance packages. Katie Clark-Sieben’s pay raises increased her salary by $60,000, then she received a $33,750 golden parachute when she left government to pursue other interests. Meanwhile, the DFL legislative leadership has been quiet as a mouse about the severance packages.

Thankfully, Republicans Speaker Daudt and Rep. Sarah Anderson aren’t letting go of this. Speaker Daudt released this statement, saying “Once again, Governor Dayton has disrespected taxpayers and used their money to inappropriately reward his top officials who are already making six-figure salaries. Today’s report highlights the importance of House Republicans’ role as a check and balance on Democrats’ wasteful spending.” Speaker Daudt’s statement also included this:

House Republicans are calling on Governor Dayton to explain unauthorized taxpayer-funded severance payments after a report emerged Tuesday that his administration awarded nearly $80,000 to state employees who voluntarily departed. The most generous severance agreement, awarded to a former Commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development, came on the heels of massive taxpayer-funded pay increases authorized by Governor Dayton. This commissioner was previously a top staffer on Dayton’s campaign for governor in 2010.

The DFL’s actions are insulting on multiple levels. First, the DFL’s priorities aren’t Minnesota’s priorities. The last time the DFL ran St. Paul, they passed a bill that paid for the $90,000,000 Senate Office Building. They passed another bill that gave $30,000 pay raises to high-profile political appointees. Those aren’t priorities for many Minnesotans.

This year, Gov. Dayton apparently decided that the $30,000/yr. pay raises weren’t enough for his cronies. This year, Gov. Dayton threw his cronies a $75,000 bone in the form of golden parachutes. This year, Gov. Dayton pocket vetoed a tax bill that would’ve provided $550,000,000 worth of tax relief for veterans, farmers, students and small businesses.

What’s stunning is that the DFL won’t answer questions about this:

A spokeswoman for the DFL Senate Majority said Senate Majority Leader Tom Bakk and Senate State Governments and Veterans Budget Division Chair Tom Saxhaug, DFL-Grand Rapids, said the two legislators would not comment on Dayton’s decision to offer severance to political appointees.

Then there’s this:

It isn’t clear why Sieben, Phillips and Wright were given a severance. Eight other commissioners who also left voluntarily during Dayton’s time in office didn’t receive severance pay.

Apparently, the trick to getting ahead in Minnesota is to make campaign contributions to Gov. Dayton’s campaign, then cash in when he appoints you to a cushy job in his administration. If you’re a blue collar worker, though, you’re SOL with the Dayton administration. They’ll only fight for certain types of white collar workers.

Keep this in mind when you go to the polls: The DFL won’t fight for you if you’re a blue collar worker. They’ll only fight for white collar government workers and the special interests.

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This article makes it pretty clear that farmers aren’t fond of Gov. Dayton. It isn’t a stretch to think that farmers aren’t happy with DFL legislators, either.

Farmers are upset with Gov. Dayton because “farmers were not happy when Dayton tried to do an end-around the legislative intent of the new buffer law and make it apply to private farmland as well as public bodies of water.” As always, Gov. Dayton tried siding with the environmental activist wing of the DFL.

Gov. Dayton wasn’t satisfied with just that. According to the article, Gov. Dayton “followed that with an executive order aimed at restricting the use of certain pesticides that some scientists have implicated in the decline in pollinators, such as honeybees.”

Gov. Dayton still wasn’t finished. According to Becker County Board Chairman Barry Nelson, “the new buffer law will also cost farmers money, because areas now enrolled in the federal Conservation Reserve Program will no longer qualify because of state-mandated buffers.”

TRANSLATION: Farmers get shafted because Gov. Dayton couldn’t resist appeasing the DFL’s environmental activist wing. Gov. Dayton didn’t consult with the farmers though it’s virtually certain that he gave the environmental activists all the time they needed to make their case for this law.

It isn’t a secret that the DFL’s reputation with farmers is dropping. Rep. Thissen thinks that expanding broadband in rural Minnesota is the way to attract additional voters. Apparently, Gov. Dayton thinks that farmers won’t notice him siding with environmental activists. It isn’t that farmers don’t care about other things. It’s that they care most about making money through farming.

Thus far, Gov. Dayton and Rep. Thissen haven’t figured that out. That’s why Republicans will hold onto their majority in the House. That’s why they have a shot at flipping the Minnesota Senate.

Technorati: Mark Dayton, Paul Thissen, Tom Landwehr, Department of Natural Resources, Buffer Zones, Environmental Activists, DFL, Farmers, MNGOP, Election 2016

I didn’t think they’d do this but TakeAction Minnesota is doing its best to exploit the Crossroads Mall shooting for political advantage. This morning, I received an email from Justin Lewandowski. Justin says that he “was born and raised in Saint Cloud” and that he’s “also a former student of Saint Cloud State” and that he’s “a community organizer.”

Justin wanted me to know that “What happened in Crossroads, in my community, this weekend is a tragedy. I’m hurting and so is the rest of my TakeAction team. We wish the ten victims of the attack and their families healing and strength.” After that, the email gets uber-emotional fast.

For instance, Sarah Drake, a single mother, community leader and TakeAction Volunteer, said “I’m a single mother passionate about learning about others and being a bridge builder. On Sunday morning I visited a Somali Muslim owned business so they knew they had an ally in the wake of this tragedy. My daughter and I discuss the issues facing our community regularly and as a result, she was leading conversations with students at school. By letting people see my actions, they started to talk about their fears and good experience with their neighbors.”

Next I heard from Sabrin, who is described as a “community leader and a “TakeAction Volunteer.” Sabrin said:

Emotions are contagious, so spread positivity. A community is like marriage, through sickness and in health, to have a healthy community requires that we be strong together, speak to each other, and to move in one breath and beat. We need to come together right now, or we won’t heal. We can’t be afraid. Let us hold hands through our roughest times.

Both of these testimonials make some foolish assumptions. First, they’re assuming that the Somali community wants to assimilate. At this point, that’s a theory. It isn’t a fact. If Somali refugees were interested in assimilation, why did the terrorist’s father need a translator when talking to police? He’s been here 18 years, which is more than enough time to learn the language.

Next, these TakeAction, aka DFL, volunteers apparently think that these refugees just need to be told that they’re welcome here for them to become productive members of the St. Cloud community. I’m sure that if Sabrin and Sarah had just talked with Dahir Adan, he wouldn’t have attacked those shoppers at Crossroads Saturday night.

It’s pretty sick to use a terrorist attack to cozy up to voters who frequently don’t share our priorities. That’s what TakeAction Minnesota just did.

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If anything demonstrates that Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges is paranoid or isn’t thinking clearly, this Facebook post is proof that a little paranoia goes a long ways.

In the key part of the post, Hodges wrote “At this difficult moment, I also urge every Minneapolitan and every Minnesotan to support and stand firmly with our Muslim, East African, and Somali friends and neighbors. A horrible, violent attack like this should never be exploited to attack a whole community and a whole religion. Yet we have seen Islamophobia rear its ugly head in terrible moments like this far too many times — *and* at a moment when one person in particular is playing to fear and hatred of immigrants on a national scale, I fully understand the worry of the Somali community here that it will happen again. From the first moments after this terrible event, the Somali community of Minnesota came together to decry this horrible act. We all get to come together to reject hate in all of its forms. We must not and will not allow hate to divide us. We are stronger together.”

Why do Democrats think that the first instinct for people they don’t know will commit acts of violence or discriminate without reason? It’s a bit insulting or more than a little paranoid. But I digress.

It’s worth noting that the definition of Islamophobia is “hatred or fear of Muslims or their politics or culture.” Let’s hear Mayor Hodges highlight the times when Islamophobia reared “its ugly head”. Let’s differentiate, though, between distrust and hatred or fear.

It isn’t normal to trust people you don’t know if that community has a history of committing acts of terrorism. Let’s talk about the elephant in the room that Ms. Hodges doesn’t want to talk about. A significant number of Somali Muslims have been convicted of “ISIS-related terrorism charges.”

Gov. Dayton visited St. Cloud Monday and added “I implore the citizens of St. Cloud and citizens throughout Minnesota to rise above this tragic incident and to remember our common humanity, our shared citizenship and our shared desires to live together peacefully and constructively for the benefit of ourselves and our families and our communities.”

The fact that the terrorist’s father has lived here for 15 years but still can’t speak English sets off red flags for me. If Mr. Adan shares my dedication to living as citizens of the United States, why hasn’t he become proficient in using its language? It isn’t like he can’t learn a language in 15 years.

Frankly, I think Gov. Dayton and Mayor Hodges take a lot of things for granted that might not actually be true. Whether that’s because they’re firm believers in wishful thinking or whether it’s because they’re knowingly denying reality is almost besides the point. It’s time for these high-profile DFL politicians to pull their head out of the sand and accept reality.

Finally, let’s remember that Gov. Dayton isn’t a fair arbiter in these fights:

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This week, a miracle happened. A handful of liberals stood up to some environmental activists.

According to the article, “Councilors Gary Anderson, Em Westerlund and Joel Sipress introduced the resolution, which asserted that “the project has the potential to impair water quality, adversely affect wild rice and aquatic life and increase mercury contamination of fish in downstream waters,” including the St. Louis River and Lake Superior itself.”

First, I’ll back up a bit and explain what the resolution was about. Again, according to the article, the city council proposed “a resolution calling on the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources to order a public hearing in front of an administrative law judge to weigh the potential risks versus the benefits of developing a proposed copper-nickel-precious metals mine on property that formerly was home to the now-defunct LTV Steel Mining Co. outside of Hoyt Lakes.”

Simply put, the request to have an administrative law judge weigh in on this is improper. The statutes that deal with permitting don’t allow for having an administrative law judge to hear the evidence. These city councilmembers were asking the DNR to ignore the law and make the procedure up as they wanted.

That trio of “councilors” wanted the City Council to ignore the law to advance their anti-development agenda. They wanted the Duluth City Council to treat them like the laws of this state didn’t apply to them.

This time, a handful of liberals told the environmental activists to take a hike. Unfortunately, I won’t expect that to happen again for another 20 years.