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Despite Poligraph’s opinion about a recent DCCC attack against Stewart Mills, the DCCC’s attack is mostly BS. Here’s what the DCCC press release said:

“Millionaire Stewart Mills III has taken thousands of dollars in campaign contributions from the health insurance industry, and now he wants to put the insurance companies back in charge to deny care to people with-pre-existing conditions and kick kids off their parents’ plans,” a DCCC press release states.

PoliGraph admitted that the DCCC’s first claim is BS:

According to Mills’ campaign finance records, he’s gotten $1,000 from the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association PAC, and that’s it.

Apparently, the DCCC needs to return to grade school English. Apparently, they didn’t learn that thousands is plural for 1,000. Apparently, the DCCC didn’t learn that 1,000 is singular for thousands. Either that or they’re just lying through their teeth, which is a distinct possibility.

Here’s the part where PoliGraph is wrong:

The DCCC also claims that Mills wants to scrap popular parts of the Affordable Care Act, including a provision that prevents insurance companies from rejecting patients with pre-existing conditions and another provision that allows children to stay on their parents’ plans until they turn 26.

Here, the DCCC is on stronger footing.

First, saying that the DCCC “is on stronger footing” isn’t saying much considering the fact that they were totally wrong about the DCCC’s first statement. Further, the DCCC’s claim is false. Here’s why:

Campaign spokeswoman Chloe Rockow says Mills isn’t opposed to making sure young adults and those with pre-existing conditions have access to health insurance; he just thinks there are better ways of doing it.

For instance, Mills wants to strengthen privacy rules for people with pre-existing conditions and to reinstate the Minnesota Comprehensive Health Association, which is a special health insurance program for people with pre-existing conditions who can’t get insurance elsewhere.

In other words, Stewart Mills wants people with pre-existing conditions to get insurance. He just prefers a different method of getting people with PECs that coverage.

The DCCC said that Mills wants “to deny care to people with-pre-existing conditions.” That’s verifiably false. Period.

The title to PoliGraph’s article is “DCCC Mills claim half wrong, half right”. The article’s accurate title should be “DCCC Mills claim almost entirely wrong.” Mills didn’t take thousands of dollars from health insurance companies and he doesn’t want to deny health insurance to people with pre-existing conditions.

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This AP article lists early the type of messaging we’ll hear from Gov. Dayton and the DFL:

For Democrats, back-to-school week brings a chance to brag about the launch of statewide all-day kindergarten where parents aren’t hit with fees or school districts don’t have to absorb costs of the extra classroom time. Over the next month, thousands of homeowners, renters and farmers will receive property tax refund checks from the state because of expanded eligibility and new money the Democratic-led Legislature and Gov. Mark Dayton designated for those programs.

That’s the glass-half-full version. Unfortunately, it omits some important details.

One of those details is how they paid for ‘free’ all-day kindergarten and the property tax refunds. Gov. Dayton and the DFL legislature paid for them by raising taxes on small business owners. Those entrepreneurs, in turn, paid for those taxes by laying people off, then hiring part-time employees who make half what the full-time employees made. That’s before factoring in the part-time employees’ loss of benefits.

The proof is already appearing. After the Dayton-DFL tax increases kicked in, job creation dropped dramatically. That drop wasn’t coincidental. Thus far this year, Minnesota’s economy created a pathetic 2,900 jobs. I’ll be perfectly clear. Minnesota’s economy isn’t creating 2,900 jobs each month. This year, it’s created 2,900 jobs.

In July, 4,200 jobs disappeared from Minnesota’s economy. Another 3,600 jobs were trimmed from June’s jobs report. That’s before talking about Minnesota’s revenues falling dramatically short of what’s needed to balance Minnesota’s budget. July’s revenues fell $69,000,000 short of what’s needed to balance the budget.

That means the Dayton-DFL deficit is speeding its way in our direction. It isn’t a matter of if we’ll have a deficit in 2015. It’s a matter of how big the Dayton-DFL deficit will be and how we’ll fix the Dayton-DFL disaster.

Hopefully, we’ll start by firing the incompetents who created this mess. That starts with terminating Gov. Dayton and demoting Speaker Thissen to Minority Leader Thissen. Next, it means spending less by spending money only on the things we need, not the things that the DFL’s special interest puppeteers push.

House Minority Leader Kurt Daudt, R-Crown, said the fact five of the past six monthly revenue reports have come in below the mark spells trouble. “They’ve taken a recovery and turned it into a flat-line at best,” Daudt said of Democrats. “It’s not me looking for a storm cloud. It’s an absolute fact and the realities of the policies they’ve put in place not working.”

Gov. Dayton and the DFL are bragging about the great Minnesota economy. Great economies, however, produce revenues that create surpluses, not deficits. The Dayton-DFL deficit is proof that Minnesota’s economy isn’t working.

Republicans aren’t happy with the state of Minnesota’s economy. They’re upset that the Dayton-DFL economy is failing hard-working Minnesotans. Republicans want to change directions so Minnesota’s economy can grow. That starts with getting PolyMet a reality. The jolt of revenues that will produce will balance Minnesota’s budget while lifting thousands of Minnesotans out of unemployment, poverty or both.

Gov. Dayton and the DFL have highlighted Minnesota’s relatively low unemployment rate. I explained in this post why the unemployment rate doesn’t prove the economy’s strength:

For the last 3+ years, the unemployment rate has been next-to-worthless as a benchmark of economic vitality. That’s because millions of people (literally) nationwide have quit looking for work, thereby artificially lowering the nation’s unemployment rate.

Another reason why the unemployment rate has become unreliable in terms of how strong the economy is is the number of people who’ve had their hours cut thanks to Obamacare. These are known as 29ers.

A person who is working a part-time low-paying job looks the same on the monthly jobs report as the employee who worked a high-paying full-time job a year ago. And there are lots of people working 2 part-time jobs who were making lots of money at their full-time jobs.

The Dayton-DFL deficit is speeding our direction. The Dayton-DFL jobs bust is already manifesting itself. Creating 2,900 jobs in 7 months is pathetic.

The question is whether voters will appreciate a handful of freebies more than they hate Minnesota’s struggling economy.

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Sunday morning, Ember Reichgott-Junge repeated the chanting point she recited Friday night. On @ Issue With Tom Hauser, Ms. Reichgott-Junge characterized Minnesota’s economy as strong, which it clearly isn’t.

An economy that just saw 4,200 jobs disappear in July isn’t strong. An economy where revenues came in 6.6% short of the state’s projection isn’t strong. An economy where the unemployment rate for an entire region of the state is 64.3% higher than the statewide average isn’t a strong economy.

This confirms the DFL’s metrocentric focus. It also confirms the fact that the DFL’s policies are designed to promote metro growth, not outstate growth. Twin Cities businesses don’t worry about regulations. Rural businesses, however, worry about regulations every day. Regulations are what’s suppressing the Iron Range economy.

Ms. Reichgott-Junge hasn’t factored those things into her calculations. The Twin Cities’ unemployment rate is 4,92%. It isn’t surprising that she either didn’t know or didn’t care that Grand Rapids’ unemployment rate for January was 11.6%, that February’s unemployment rate was 11.9% and that March’s unemployment rate was 11.2%. That’s more than twice as high as the statewide average.

I triple dog dare a DFL politician to explain how that type of chronic unemployment is proof of a vibrant, expanding economy. For the last 3+ years, the unemployment rate has been next-to-worthless as a benchmark of economic vitality. That’s because millions of people (literally) nationwide have quit looking for work, thereby artificially lowering the nation’s unemployment rate.

Another reason why the unemployment rate has become unreliable in terms of how strong the economy is is the number of people who’ve had their hours cut thanks to Obamacare. These are known as 29ers.

Minnesota hasn’t been immune from these trends. There are lots of people who’ve quit looking for work. The workforce participation rate is on the verge of dropping below 70% for the first time since October, 1980. According to the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development, aka DEED, the percentage of people who are underemployed is almost 50%.

When people quit looking for work, that’s proof the economy isn’t vibrant. If they’re working a part-time job in the hospitality industry after being a manager in a manufacturing company, that’s proof that the economy isn’t producing the high-paying jobs Minnesotans need to pay their bills.

Gov. Dayton and the DFL chanting puppets will undoubtedly keep chanting that Minnesota’s economy is strong. That’s their choice. It just isn’t the truth.

The workforce participation rate is proof of a stagnant economy. The fact that Minnesota’s economy has created only 2,900 jobs in 2014 is proof of a stagnant (or worse) economy. The fact that a major part of the state (the Iron Range) is suffering through a higher-than-normal unemployment rate (8.02%) is proof that the policies passed by the DFL legislature and implemented by Gov. Dayton aren’t working.

The revenues that Gov. Dayton and the DFL need to come in to balance the budget aren’t coming in. In July, revenues fell $69,000,000 short of projections. Thus far this year, revenues have fallen short of projection in 5 of the 6 months we have statistics for. The Dayton-DFL economy is heading towards the Dayton-DFL deficit.

Gov. Dayton and the DFL are satisfied with an economy where unemployment rates are artificially low and stagnant wages and part-time jobs are real.

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Former DFL legislators on Friday night’s Almanac Roundtable panel exemplified the best definition of DFL shovel-ready jobs. I’m betting they didn’t notice but Ember Reichgott-Junge and Mindy Greiling talked themselves into circles, thanks in large part to Amy Koch’s spot on analysis of the state of Minnesota’s economy.

Sen. Koch rightly highlighted the fact that, while Minnesota’s unemployment rate was low, Minnesota’s economy was still underperforming. Prior to her observation, Ms. Reichgott-Junge talked about how Minnesota’s economy was strong and that the unemployment rate was lower than the national average.

That’s when Sen. Koch said that, despite the low unemployment rate, people aren’t feeling good about the recovery because many Minnesotans are working 2 jobs and their wages don’t equal what they used to make. Sen. Koch then talked about the woman with an MBA working “as a barista at Starbucks” isn’t feeling the recovery. She said that, “while being a barista is a fine job”, the woman with the MBA would rather be working in her area of expertise.

At that moment, Rep. Greiling jumped in, saying that “that’s why I think Democrats will get credit for raising the minimum wage.” She explained that people will be grateful for getting a pay raise so they can pay their bills.

Summarizing this exchange up, Ms. Reichgott-Junge insisted that Minnesota’s economy is going gangbusters even though women with MBAs are working a part-time job at half the wages they made when they were working in their career path. Never fear, said Rep. Greiling. Those women should be greatful that these women with MBAs who used to make $25/hr. who had to accept a job paying $7.25/hr. are now making $8.00/hr.

Nothing says recovery like getting a 75-cent/hr. pay hike at a part-time job after making $25/hr. in a full-time job in your career field.

Sen. Reichgott-Junge insists that Minnesota’s economy is a source of pride for the DFL, then Rep. Greiling chips in by saying that people that got displaced from their high-paying, full-time jobs can now find part-time work that pays them the new minimum wage.

Give these DFLers credit. They brought their shovels to the set Friday night. They were prepared to spread the DFL’s bullshit of economic prosperity no matter how many circles they talked themselves into.

The reality is that the Dayton-DFL economy is flailing and failing. It’s ‘working’ in the Twin Cities because 21,523 new government jobs are mostly located there. It’s failing in outstate Minnesota, where job creation has been minimal, if not non-existent.

Why shouldn’t voters in Alexandria, Brainerd, Willmar, Redwood Falls, Park Rapids, Bemidji, Thief River Falls, Moorhead and the Iron Range vote against the DFL? They aren’t better off now than they were 4 years ago. In fact, Iron Rangers are significantly worse off now, thanks mostly to the environmental activist wing of the DFL.

It’s time for Republicans to start talking about the DFL’s economic failures. It’s time they started highlighting the fact that Minnesota’s economy is stagnating. The Dayton-DFL deficit is a matter of when, not if.

The Dayton-DFL policies are hurting private sector, outstate job creation. The Twin Cities are doing ok but the rest of the state is hurting. Apparently, that’s how Gov. Dayton and the DFL measure success.

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When I wrote this post, I wrote it to highlight the tactics Democrats use to steal elections. In the first post, I focused on the things the local Democratic Party is doing.

Unfortunately, this isn’t just happening at the state level. It’s happening at the federal level, too:

NOM said that an investigation revealed that its 2008 tax return and list of major donors was released to Matthew Meisel, a gay activist in Boston, MA. Email correspondence from Meisel revealed that he told a colleague that he had “a conduit” to obtain NOM’s confidential information. While testifying under oath in a deposition in the litigation, Meisel invoked the 5th Amendment against self-incrimination and refused to disclose the identity of his conduit. Documents obtained during the litigation prove that Meisel then provided NOM’s tax data to the Human Rights Campaign (whose president was a national Co-Chair of the Obama Reelection Campaign). The information was also published by the Huffington Post.

The weaponization of government by Democrats can’t be denied. In Wisconsin, John Chisholm, the Milwaukee County Attorney, opened a John Doe investigation into something that isn’t a crime in a blatant political move to scuff up Scott Walker in the hope that he’d either lose his re-election bid or that he’d be damaged goods if he wanted to run for governor.

In Minnesota, 13 DFL candidates for the Minnesota state senate coordinated their mailings with the DFL Senate Campaign Committee in an attempt to steal the Senate majority. When 11 DFL candidates got elected, the DFL Senate Caucus wrote a $100,000 check.

Nationally, the IRS sent the Human Rights Council, an issue advocacy organization, confidential IRS filings from the National Organization for Marriage, aka NOM, that listed NOM’s contributors. That’s been prohibited since the US Supreme Court issued its ruling on the NAACP v. Alabama lawsuit on June 30, 1958.

The point of this is to show the Democrats’ disdain for the rule of law, long-settled Supreme Court rulings and the Bill of Rights. If these things are standing between Democrats and election victories, then it’s predictable that Democrats will ignore the rule of law, the Bill of Rights and US Supreme Court rulings.

If I wanted to summarize this with a bit of snark, I’d say that the Democrats’ method of operation is this: Win if you can, lose if you must but always cheat. In the Democrats’ minds, it isn’t really cheating if its for the greater good.

I know that lefties’ heads will explode when they hear this but that’s their problem. These are just some of the most recent incidents when the left just threw the rules out the window. This isn’t a comprehensive list by any stretch of the imagination. In fact, it’s barely the tip of the iceberg.

These days, the Democrats’ defining priority is winning at all cost. If that means lying, fine. If that means breaking well-established laws, that’s ok. If that means intimidating people out of participating in the political process, Democrats don’t have a problem with that.

Democrats won’t hesitate in cheating if it helps them win elections. The only question I have is this: when did Democrats stop caring about the rule of law?

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Yestedray, I wrote this post to highlight Gov. Dayton’s juvenile jab at North Dakota. Here’s what he said that caught my attention:

“Every night I dream before I go to sleep of mobilizing the National Guard and annexing North Dakota.” He then quickly followed that statement by saying he’d just been interested in annexing the part of the state will oil, “They can have the rest of it.”

Apparently, North Dakotans don’t care about Gov. Dayton’s juvenile statement. This Gallup poll is telling. This graphic is exceptionally telling:

Gov. Dayton and the DFL should study this graphic before making another childish statement:

North Dakotans are not just satisfied with their economy, however. Across the 50 states, North Dakotans are the most likely to rate their K-12 education as excellent or good, to agree that their schools prepare students to get a good job, and to be satisfied with the education system or schools overall.

I can hear Gov. Dayton, the DFL and the Alliance for a Better Minnesota screaming that this can’t be. In Gov. Dayton’s and the DFL’s minds, Minnesota is the education state in the Upper Midwest.

What’s most telling, though, is that Dakotans think their air quality is great. The percentage of people that said they were satisfied with their air quality was the highest in the nation. The percentage of people who said that they were satisfied with their water quality was above average nationally.

Gov. Dayton and the metrocentric DFL should take a look at this:

“Oil is a very thick frosting on a very nicely baked cake,” Peterson says. Oil had been found in North Dakota before, but Dalrymple, Peterson, and Al Anderson, North Dakota state commerce commissioner, agree that the volume and velocity of the boom was unexpected. Dalrymple says there were 200,000 barrels a day in 2009, compared with 1 million barrels a day now.

“The rapid evolution of the oil industry was not foreseen,” says Anderson. “We had seen oil booms come and go but now the technology has changed,” Peterson says. “We didn’t realize how much oil was in the ground. We found ways to extract oil that we could never expect.”

In addition to oil, success in agriculture, manufacturing, and tourism are contributing factors to North Dakota’s having the lowest unemployment in the U.S. for the past four years. The state has added 116,000 jobs since 2000, a job-growth increase of 35.6%. Net migration in the state is up 12.7% since 2000. This onrush of new jobs and workers has strained the housing market. North Dakota residents are fully aware of this, as 61% say they are satisfied with the availability of affordable housing in their state, one of the lowest in the nation.

Gov. Dayton and the DFL insist that North Dakota’s economic boom is tied to the Bakken boom. There’s no denying that it’s a huge factor in North Dakota’s economic success. Still, there’s no denying the fact that manufacturing and agriculture play a big role in North Dakota’s economic boom time.

At a time when Gov. Dayton and the DFL are trying to make Minnesota’s economy more metrocentric, they should be looking at the success our neighbors to the west are experiencing.

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Gov. Dayton’s dreaming is interesting:

During a rail safety meeting in Red Wing last week, DFL Gov. Mark Dayton said Minnesota does not enjoy much economic benefit from the trains carrying highly volatile crude oil from North Dakota’s Bakken region.

That led the governor at one point to joke, “Every night I dream before I go to sleep of mobilizing the National Guard and annexing North Dakota.”

He then quickly followed that statement by saying he’d just been interested in annexing the part of the state will oil, “They can have the rest of it.” That generated plenty of laughter among the audience gathered at the Red Wing Public Library.

“But,” Dayton added, “that’s obviously not an option.”— Heather J. Carlson

It’s interesting that Gov. Dayton brought up North Dakota’s oil because Minnesota is sitting on a different economic goldmine. While it’s true the PolyMet and Twin Metals projects won’t have the economic impact that the Bakken will have, there’s no question those mining projects would positively impact Minnesota’s economy for a generation.

The great news is that we don’t have to annex the land where the PolyMet and Twin Metals projects would be built. The bad news is that we’ve got Gov. Dayton kowtowing to the environmental activists. Developing those mines would be fantastic.

My personal dream is to develop those mines while jettisoning Gov. Dayton and the environmental activists. I know that it isn’t possible to get rid of the environmental activists but it’s quite possible to replace Gov. Dayton with Gov.-Elect Johnson.

The thing is that it isn’t possible to develop mining if Gov. Dayton is re-elected.

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David Strom’s op-ed highlights the fact that Minnesota’s economy isn’t as strong as Gov. Dayton and the Alliance for a Better Minnesota have said it is:

Just a few years ago, more than 75 percent of adults in Minnesota were in the workforce. Now that number is 70.1 percent—yet that 5 percentage-point difference isn’t actually counted in the unemployment number, because unemployment only measures people “in the workforce.”

That’s thousands of people who fall into the category of “discouraged worker;” you and I probably think of them as having given up looking for work.

Gov. Dayton’s quote about Minnesota’s economy is utterly dishonest:

“The economy is improving and growing rapidly.”

Either Gov. Dayton isn’t honest or his grip on reality isn’t that tight. An economy can’t be “growing rapidly” when tens of thousands of people have given up looking for work. Rapidly growing economies are characterized by people jumping into the workforce:

Workforce participation peaked in the Clinton years, and slowly drifted down post 9/11. Finally, in 2006 it started rising again, as the economy recovered until the crash.

Since then, it has plummeted, and is still declining.

When an economy is really booming, the workforce expands because opportunity is out there. We simply aren’t seeing that, and people aren’t feeling it either.

There’s no doubt that Gov. Dayton and ABM will continue their mantra that Minnesota’s economy is getting stronger each day Gov. Dayton is in office. That it isn’t growing rapidly isn’t their concern because they aren’t worried about telling the truth. They’re only worried about getting Gov. Dayton re-elected.

There are other warning signs we should be paying attention to: tax revenues have come in under projections in 5 of the past 6 months, signaling that the economy isn’t doing as well as economists predicted. Much of that shortfall is due to poor income tax collections, indicating that people aren’t making as much money.

There’s little doubt that we’re heading for a significant deficit. The only question is how we’ll choose to fix it. Gov. Dayton raised taxes on “the rich” in 2013, which means he can’t raise their taxes again without cratering Minnesota’s economy. The DFL won’t cut spending, either, which means Gov. Dayton and the DFL will deplete the state’s Rainy Day Fund. Once they’ve depleted the Rainy Day Fund, which seems inevitable, then it’ll be a matter of whether Gov. Dayton and the DFL will raise taxes on the middle class.

Mark Dayton risks looking out of touch if he touts the Minnesota economy too much. Hardly anyone thinks things are “booming” right now, unless you count the people striking out for the Bakken oil fields. Most of us, in fact, feel like we are just hanging on, thankful for the job we have, and worried that it might not be there this time next year.

The other people that think Minnesota’s economy is booming are the 21,523 people who’ve been hired by the government. If you’re looking for work in the government, then St. Paul or DC is the place to be. If you want private sector work, however, Minnesota isn’t that great.

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Brian Bakst’s AP article contains this quote, which proves Gov. Dayton will lie if that’s what he thinks he needs to get elected:

Dayton sees it as “an indication of how desperate the Republicans are to find something to complain about because they know the economy is improving and growing rapidly.”

Gov. Dayton’s statement is, at minimum, fiction. At most, it’s an outright lie. If Minnesota’s economy is “growing rapidly”, as Gov. Dayton insists, why haven’t revenues met projections 5 of the last 6 months? If Minnesota’s economy is “growing rapidly,” why did revenues fall 6.6% short of projections last month?

There’s little doubt in my mind that Gov. Dayton will continue repeating that fiction the rest of the campaign. He isn’t worried that the media will question his statement. Brian Bakst certainly didn’t question Gov. Dayton’s statement. I haven’t seen other reporters question the Alliance for a Better Minnesota’s latest video that insists that Minnesota is working, either.

Let’s be blunt about this. Gov. Dayton hasn’t hesitated in insisting that Minnesota’s economy is doing well. ABM hasn’t hesitated in insisting that life under Gov. Dayton is a return to the DFL’s glory days. The Twin Cities media hasn’t questioned the voracity of Gov. Dayton’s statements or ABM’s lies.

ABM won’t say anything about the fact that DEED just announced the fact that Minnesota’s economy just lost 7,800 in the last jobs report. DEED reported that Minnesota’s economy shrunk by 4,200 jobs in July and that they’d overestimated the number of jobs created in June by 3,600.

Gov. Dayton certainly won’t talk about the verifie fact that Minnesota’s economy has create a pathetic 2,900 jobs thus far this year. Why would he when he knows that ABM will lie for him and the Twin Cities media won’t question him?

If Republicans don’t start questioning the media, Gov. Dayton and ABM, they’ll lose this highly winnable election. When I say Republicans, that’s everyone from Keith Downey to Jeff Johnson and Bill Quisle to legislative candidates like Dale Lueck and Jim Knoblach to the activists working to win over voters, then getting them to vote for Republicans.

“The Republicans are right in saying the economy still looks dismal relative to reasonable expectations,” Chari said. “The Democrats are also right in saying there’s only a limited amount in what a governor of a relatively small state can do when faced with headwinds this strong.”

Actually, this graphic says that a governor’s policies can have a rather dramatic impact on the economy:

That graphic is proof that job creation tanked after the Dayton-DFL tax increase went into effect. That graphic verifies as fact that Minnesota’s economy has created few jobs this year. While jobs were created by the hundreds when Republicans had the majority in the House and Senate, jobs are being create by the dozens since the Dayton-DFL tax increases took effect. In fact, Minnesota had negative job growth last month.

It isn’t surprising that Gov. Dayton and the Alliance for a Better Minnesota is telling whoppers about the state of the state’s economy. It’s up to Jeff Johnson and the Republican Party of Minnesota to swat down Gov. Dayton’s and ABM’s myths.

The statistics are there. All we have to do is tell the truth.

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Friday night at the Great Minnesota Get Together, Larry Jacobs offered his predictable commentary on the various races throughout most of the Almanac Roundtable. Then Prof. Jacobs said something so ridiculous that it must be challenged. Here’s what he said that’s questionable:

But, within the states, such as gubernatorial races, the dynamics are a little different. For instance, in Minnesota, the economy is doing very well. People feel much more optimistic than they do nationally and that’s probably going to create a little different dynamic.

It’s insulting to hear a person who’s one of the go-to political gurus in Minnesota say something that assinine. I’m tempted to start a petition telling Prof. Jacobs that there’s more to political punditry than regurgitating the DFL’s chanting points.

Further, later this weekend, I’m going to send Prof. Jacobs an email telling him that he isn’t helping his credibility to ignore DEED’s (Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development) monthly jobs reports, which he’s obviously doing. If he’d been reading those reports, he’d notice a couple things that won’t help Gov. Dayton.

First, DEED’s latest jobs report showed that a) Minnesota’s economy shed 4,200 jobs in July and b) DEED revised June’s jobs report downward by 3,600 jobs. Next, if Prof. Jacobs had paid attention, he’d see that Minnesota’s economy created a wimpy 2,900 total jobs thus far this year.

HINT TO PROF. JACOBS: Creating dozens of jobs a month isn’t proof of the economy “doing very well.” In most parts of the state, that’s considered rather pathetic.

Had Prof. Jacobs looked at the top 5 cities in terms of job creation for the past 12 months, the Twin Cities led the way with 46,339 jobs create, followed by St. Cloud with 2,894 jobs, then several cities with 1,000-1,200 jobs created each.

That means cities like Alexandria, Brainerd, Fairmont, Little Falls, Moorhead, Owatonna, Redwood Falls and Thief River Falls and regions like the Iron Range essentially didn’t experience job growth. Doesn’t Prof. Jacobs think that those cities and regions should have prospering economies? If not, why not?

I get it that most nonagricultural jobs are in the Twin Cities. I’ll stipulate that it’s probably been that way since the Perpich administration left office. I won’t stipulate, however, that that’s the right economic model for Minnesota. It isn’t right that Gov. Dayton’s economic policies haven’t created economic opportunities in outstate Minnesota.

Prof. Jacobs has spent too much time in Minneapolis. It’s time he started paying attention to cities outside the Twin Cities. Those cities deserve economic prosperity, too.

Yes, I was being sarcastic when I asked if Prof. Jacobs was a DFL operative. Still, I’ll start respecting Prof. Jacobs more when Prof. Jacobs starts paying attention to the world outside the Twin Cities on a consistent basis.

Minnesota’s economy isn’t “doing very well.” It’s time that the Twin Cities pundits figured that out.

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