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Today’s White House press briefing deviated from most White House press briefings in that it included a lengthy presentation from Kevin Hassett, the current chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers. During his presentation, Hassett presented slide after slide verifying the fact that the economic growth we’re currently experiencing isn’t a continuation of economic performance under President Obama. During Hassett’s presentation, his charts showed economic activity during President Obama’s final term in office, the trend that President Trump inherited and the economy’s performance during President Trump’s time in office.

You’ll see in this video that most of the trends inherited by President Trump were either flat or going down:

These aren’t marginal or obscure statistics, either. Measuring whether it’s a good time to expand your small business isn’t insignificant. When the answer given is that it’s a good time to expand, that’s proof that the economy is heading in the right direction. What’s more is that Hassett’s charts show that opinions have changed on this matter since President Trump took office. President Obama’s statements claiming credit for the strong Trump economy are either BS or outright spin. (The second chart especially exposes President Obama’s claims as foolishness.)

The trend for core capital goods changed pretty dramatically, too, both in terms of orders and shipments. Only a partisan would argue that President Trump’s policies haven’t significantly changed the trajectory of the US economy. It’s like arguing that water isn’t wet. Nobody in their right mind will believe President Obama’s claims after seeing this information. Then again, Democrat partisans will trust him rather than these statistics.

Here’s hoping that GOP candidates, especially those in the House, start challenging their Democratic challengers with these statistics. It’s time to force Democrats to deal with reality.

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