Archive for the ‘Tim Scott’ Category

Thomas Edsall’s article is a lengthy read but a worthwhile read. Deep into the article, Edsall quoted Ismail K. White and Chryl N. Laird, political scientists at Duke and Bowdoin, as saying “Political solidarity has been a crucial political asset of black Americans during a long struggle against racial injustice, and a few symbolic gestures or policy initiatives won’t win significant black support for Republicans.”

Do White and Laird think that criminal justice reform, opportunity scholarships, record minority unemployment and the IMPACT Act as “a few symbolic gestures or policy initiatives?” It isn’t surprising that White and Laird are “the authors of a new book ‘Steadfast Democrats: How Social Forces Shape Black Political Behavior.” I haven’t read the book but it sounds like White and Laird think that African-Americans are monolithic voters. I find that impossible to believe.

The definition of monolithic is “characterized by massiveness, total uniformity, rigidity, invulnerability, etc.; a monolithic society.” During the early primaries, liberal pundits speculated that Pete Buttigieg would have difficulty attracting African-American voters because he’s gay. Some African-Americans still voted for Buttigieg but African-Americans who were also evangelical Christians found Buttigieg’s holier-than-thou attitude off-putting.

White and Laird’s theory might turn out right. Still, betting on monoliths is foolish. Betting on monolithic structures when we’ve seen dynamic changes like this happen isn’t foolish, it’s stupid:

The definition of symbolic gesture is “an act that has no purpose or effect other than to show support, respect, etc.” Opportunity Zones aren’t symbolic. They’re substantive. According to Sen. Tim Scott, his legislation will provide “workforce training opportunities to better education to businesses being attracted into these opportunity zones.”

Those aren’t token gestures. Those are the types of things that make multi-generational, substantive improvements. Charles Payne is right in stating that Sen. Scott would be on the cover of Time Magazine if he was a Democrat who got this legislation enacted.

This article is pessimistic about the Republicans making gains with African-Americans. I think that too many African-American people’s lives have improved for the vote to essentially stay the same. This fall, we’ll see whose prediction is right.

PS- Anyone betting against Candace Owens and Tim Scott is foolish.

This past week, a variety of articles on the 2020 presidential election have caught my attention. They’ve left me wondering whether (or how much) the dynamics of the 2020 race are changing. This article has me wondering whether President Trump will win a significantly higher percentage of the African-American vote. In 2016, he won 8% of the African-American vote nationwide. Imagine what would happen if President Trump got 15% of the African-American vote in Pennsylvania.

If Democrats don’t flip back Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin, they can’t get to 270 electoral votes. Technically, they can but it isn’t likely. According to Pete Hegseth’s reporting, First Immanuel Baptist Church Pastor Todd Johnson has seen a change in his congregation. According to Pastor Johnson, “the Opportunity Zone [provision] in the city of brotherly love — created by the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act — is working.”

Johnson then said “Some who were hardcore Democrats are not quite as hardcore now. And then there are some who are leaving the Democratic Party in Philadelphia. I’m hopeful that by the time the election rolls around in November, we will see more people leaving the Democratic Party and giving President Trump and the Republican Party a chance.”

President Trump’s Super Bowl ad featuring Alice Johnson was powerful:

When President Trump announced that Jenayah Davis was getting awarded an opportunity scholarship, everyone in the gallery applauded. All the Republicans seated on the House floor stood and applauded. Democrats stayed sitting. Democrats were overwhelmed with Trump hatred. Democrats didn’t applaud Jenayah. What isn’t shown in the video is President Trump’s exhortation to Congress to create 1,000,000 new opportunity scholarships this year.

Pelosi’s Democrats won’t do that. They can’t do that. That’s because they’re a wholly-owned subsidiary of the NEA and AFT. African-American voters are watching and noticing. They’re noticing what President Trump is doing to make their lives better. They’re noticing in increasing numbers that Democrats are all talk and no action.

Mischaracterizations are getting dismissed. By now, Prof. Borysenko’s article has become legendary. Still, it’s worth talking about the most important message from the article:

So, I headed over an hour and a half before the doors were scheduled to open—which was four hours before Trump was set to take the stage—and the line already stretched a mile away from the entrance to the arena. As I waited, I chatted with the folks around me. And contrary to all the fears expressed, they were so nice. I was not harassed or intimidated, and I was never in fear of my safety even for a moment. These were average, everyday people. They were veterans, schoolteachers, and small business owners who had come from all over the place for the thrill of attending this rally. They were upbeat and excited. In chatting, I even let it slip that I was a Democrat. The reaction: “Good for you! Welcome!”

Myths are getting shattered. It’s indisputable that President is far from perfect. Prof. Borysenko cut to the heart of the matter:

The reality is that many people I spoke to do disagree with Trump on things. They don’t always like his attitude. They wish he wouldn’t tweet so much. People who are in cults don’t question their leaders. The people I spoke with did, but the pros in their eyes far outweighed the cons. They don’t love him because they think he’s perfect. They love him despite his flaws, because they believe he has their back.

Bingo. I know that Democrats will dump a person in a heartbeat if they think it’s to their political advantage. President Trump hasn’t kept all of his promises but he’s worked tirelessly to keep them. President Trump’s policies have improved life for literally millions of Americans. He’s worked with the African-American community by including the Opportunity Zone provision in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. He did that at the request of HUD Secretary Ben Carson and Sen. Tim Scott (R-SC).

Lives are getting improved. Minority communities are noticing. That’s why it’s looking like the dynamics of this race are changing. As the saying goes, good policies make for great politics.